lnu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
High-light acclimation in Quercus robur L. seedlings upon over-topping a shaded environment.
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
USDA Forest Service, Southern Research Station, Center for Bottomland Hardwoods Research, P.O. Box 227, Stoneville, MS 38776, USA.
USDA Agricultural Research Service, Crop Production Systems Research Unit, P.O. Box 350, Stoneville, MS USA.
2012 (English)In: Environmental and Experimental Botany, ISSN 0098-8472, E-ISSN 1873-7307, Vol. 78, 25-32 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

High developmental plasticity at the seedling-level during acclimation to the light environment may be an important determinant of seedling establishment and growth in temperate broadleaf forests, especially in dense understories where spatial light availability can vary greatly. Pedunculate oak (Quercus robur L.) seedlings were raised beneath a range of artificial light environments (high light, partial high light and low light) to examine morphological and photosynthetic acclimation to vertically stratified light availability. Acclimation observed at the seedling level included changes in proportional distribution of biomass and leaf area ratio to enhance either light gathering under low light availability or reduction of moisture stress under high light availability. Seedling-level acclimation was partially driven by plasticity at the flush level, but plasticity of traits determining flush morphology, such as leaf number, area, and mass, was largely controlled during bud formation rather than during shoot development. Therefore, flush-level acclimation was restricted when shoots elongated from a shaded environment into a high light environment. In contrast, traits influencing leaf-level acclimation, such as leaf thickness, specific leaf area, and pigment concentrations appeared to be driven primarily by the prevailing light environment during leaf development. The plastic response in leaf traits to light environments during shoot development enabled immediate acclimation of photosynthetic capacity to the prevailing light environment. In conclusion, oak seedlings displayed a large phenotypical plasticity on multiple levels that maximized whole seedling performance.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2012. Vol. 78, 25-32 p.
Keyword [en]
Morphological plasticity; Vegetative partitioning; Shade avoidance; Irradiance; Woody sapling; Photosynthesis
National Category
Botany Forest Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-40403DOI: 10.1016/j.envexpbot.2011.12.020OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-40403DiVA: diva2:790568
Available from: 2015-02-25 Created: 2015-02-25 Last updated: 2016-12-05Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Jensen, Anna M.
In the same journal
Environmental and Experimental Botany
BotanyForest Science

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 35 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf