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Contemporary Heritage and the Future
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-0557-9651
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. (Arkeologi)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-8747-4131
2015 (English)In: The Palgrave Handbook of Contemporary Heritage Research / [ed] Emma Waterton, Steve Watson, New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015, 509-523 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Studies of the future are pertinent in order to make the best decisions in present society. They are, however, full of difficulties, as the future is an empirical field which does not exist (Slaughter, 1996; Bell, 1997; Mogensen, 2006). Both pertinence and difficulties apply also to studying the future in relation to human culture. The main challenge lies in the circumstance that cultural heritage of the future cannot in itself be empirically investigated and described, since it is in part dependent on decisions that have not yet been made. Studying heritage futures is thus about considering what we know about cultural heritage in the context of prognoses and visions of what will come. Yet how do we do that? The American anthropologist Samuel Gerald Collins contributed to an interesting discussion on how anthropology and anthropologists have previously embraced the future and how they might now be embracing it. He emphasized that an important approach is to vouchsafe the possibility that future ways in which people will think and act may be very different from today, and, in doing so, to open up a space (or a spacetime) for critical reflection on the present (Collins, 2008, p. 8). This approach is a useful programmatic declaration for engaging with the future in disciplines such as anthropology, archaeology, history and heritage studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015. 509-523 p.
National Category
Archaeology
Research subject
Humanities, Archaeology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-40670DOI: 10.1007/978-1-137-29356-5_32Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84967495559ISBN: 978-1-137-29355-8 (print)ISBN: 978-1-349-45123-4 (print)ISBN: 9781137293565 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-40670DiVA: diva2:793774
Available from: 2015-03-09 Created: 2015-03-09 Last updated: 2016-08-12Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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More languages
Output format
  • html
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