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Family members’ experiences of keeping a diary during a sick relative’s stay in the intensive care unit: A hermeneutic interview study
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. County Hospital Kalmar, Sweden.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences. School of Nursing & Midwifery, UK.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
County Hospital Kalmar, Sweden ; Kalmar County Council, Sweden.
2015 (English)In: Intensive & Critical Care Nursing, ISSN 0964-3397, E-ISSN 1532-4036, Vol. 31, no 4, 241-249 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective

The aim of the study was to explore family members’ experiences with keeping a diary during a sick relative's stay in the ICU.

Design

A qualitative method with a hermeneutic approach was used. Eleven participants, who recorded nine diaries in total, were interviewed. The collected data were analysed using a hermeneutic approach inspired by Gadamer.

Results

The analysis revealed a meta-theme: ‘it [writing in the diary] felt like contact’ which was created by a feeling of togetherness and the opportunity to communicate with the patient. Keeping a diary likely meets the needs of family members in several ways because it becomes a way to be present at the patient's bedsides, to provide caregiving, to maintain hope and to relay cogent information. However, concerns regarding negative aspects of diary keeping were also raised; for example, the diary created feelings of stress, guilt and failure and exposed intimate details.

Conclusion

The diary symbolised the maintenance of relationships with the patients and was a substitute for the usual opportunities for communication. Furthermore, it was instrumental in meeting the needs of the majority of family members in several ways. Nevertheless, the diary did have negative effects for certain individuals, which highlights the importance of an individualised approach.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Elsevier, 2015. Vol. 31, no 4, 241-249 p.
Keyword [en]
Diaries, Experiences, Gadamer, Hermeneutics, ICU, Relatives
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-40856DOI: 10.1016/j.iccn.2014.11.002ISI: 000361146200007OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-40856DiVA: diva2:795534
Available from: 2015-03-16 Created: 2015-03-16 Last updated: 2015-10-02Bibliographically approved

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Johansson, MariaHanson, ElizabethRuneson, Ingrid
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf