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Self-employment and parental leave
Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Economics and Statistics. (Centre for Ageing and Lifecourse Studies)
Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Economics and Statistics. (Centre for Ageing and Lifecourse Studies)
2015 (English)In: Small Business Economics, ISSN 0921-898X, E-ISSN 1573-0913, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 751-770Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The main objective of this paper is to analyse the extent to which employment status impacts upon the use of parental leave in Sweden. Our results show that during the child’s first two years of life Swedish female self-employees use on average 46 fewer days in parental leave (15 percent) than female wage earners, while male self-employees use on average 27 fewer days in parental leave (71 percent) than their wage earner counterparts.  We argue that the shorter average duration of parental leave among male self-employees is due to a combination of relatively higher costs of absence from work for self-employees compared to wage earners and a participation selection effect where some individuals with high performance-related income opt for self-employment and do not take parental leave at all, and where the self-employed who actually choose to take parental leave are similar to wage earners in terms of work-commitments and consequently reduces the difference in duration between self-employed and wage earners. On the other hand, given that all mothers, self-employees or wage earners, take parental leave, we do not find a participation effect among female self-employees. Instead, we suspect that there is an employment selection effect where women with high performance related income choose self-employment and consequently contributes to the shorter observed durations of parental leave for female self-employees.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Springer, 2015. Vol. 45, no 4, p. 751-770
Keywords [en]
Parental leave, employment status, gender equality, Sweden, self-employment
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Economy; Economy, Economics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-41690DOI: 10.1007/s11187-015-9669-6ISI: 000364231600005Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84946481010OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-41690DiVA, id: diva2:800362
Funder
Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare, 25214-2010Available from: 2015-04-02 Created: 2015-04-02 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved

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Anxo, DominiqueEricson, Thomas

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