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Carbon dioxide stimulation of photosynthesis in Liquidambar styraciflua is not sustained during a 12-year field experiment
Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA.
Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA.
Macquarie University, Australia.
Oak Ridge National Laboratory, USA.
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2015 (English)In: AoB Plants, ISSN 2041-2851, E-ISSN 2041-2851, Vol. 7, plu074Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Elevated atmospheric CO2 (eCO2) often increases photosynthetic CO2assimilation (A) in field studies of temperate tree species. However, there is evidence that A may decline through time due to biochemical and morphological acclimation, and environmental constraints. Indeed, at the free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) study in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, A was increased in 12-year-old sweetgum trees following 2 years of ∼40 % enhancement of CO2A was re-assessed a decade later to determine if the initial enhancement of photosynthesis by eCO2 was sustained through time. Measurements were conducted at prevailing CO2 and temperature on detached, re-hydrated branches using a portable gas exchange system. Photosynthetic CO2 response curves (A versus the CO2 concentration in the intercellular air space (Ci); or ACi curves) were contrasted with earlier measurements using leaf photosynthesis model equations. Relationships between light-saturated photosynthesis (Asat), maximum electron transport rate (Jmax), maximum Rubisco activity (Vcmax), chlorophyll content and foliar nitrogen (N) were assessed. In 1999, Asat for eCO2treatments was 15.4 ± 0.8 μmol m−2 s−1, 22 % higher than aCO2treatments (P < 0.01). By 2009, Asat declined to <50 % of 1999 values, and there was no longer a significant effect of eCO2 (Asat = 6.9 or 5.7 ± 0.7 μmol m−2 s−1 for eCO2 or aCO2, respectively). In 1999, there was no treatment effect on area-based foliar N; however, by 2008, N content in eCO2 foliage was 17 % less than that in aCO2 foliage. Photosynthetic N-use efficiency (Asat : N) was greater in eCO2 in 1999 resulting in greaterAsat despite similar N content, but the enhanced efficiency in eCO2 trees was lost as foliar N declined to sub-optimal levels. There was no treatment difference in the declining linear relationships between Jmax or Vcmax with declining N, or in the ratio of Jmax : Vcmax through time. Results suggest that the initial enhancement of photosynthesis to elevated CO2 will not be sustained through time if N becomes limited.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxford University Press, 2015. Vol. 7, plu074
Keyword [en]
Acclimation, down-regulation, free-air CO2 enrichment, nitrogen limitation, sweetgum
National Category
Botany
Research subject
Technology (byts ev till Engineering), Forestry and Wood Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-41891DOI: 10.1093/aobpla/plu074OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-41891DiVA: diva2:801252
Projects
ORNL -FACE
Available from: 2015-04-08 Created: 2015-04-08 Last updated: 2016-04-20Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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