lnu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Nurse Trees as a Forest Restoration Tool for Mixed Plantations: Effects on Competing Vegetation and Performance in Target Tree Species
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Southern Swedish Forest Research Center, Sweden.
Johann Heinrich von Thünen-Institut (TI), Federal Research Institute for Rural Areas, Forestry and Fisheries, Institute of Forest Ecosystems, Eberswalde, Germany.
Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center, Department of Forestry and Natural Resources, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, U.S.A.
Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Climate Change Science Institute, Oak Ridge, TN, U.S.A.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-5113-5624
2014 (English)In: Restoration Ecology, ISSN 1061-2971, E-ISSN 1526-100X, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 758-765Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Multi-species mixed plantations can be designed to meet social, economic, and environmental objectives during forest restoration. This paper reports results from an experiment in southern Sweden concerning the influence of three different fast growing nurse tree species on the cover of herbaceous vegetation and on the performance of several target tree species. After 10 years, the nurse trees had reduced the competing herbaceous vegetation but the effect was weak and it may take more than a decade to achieve effective vegetation control. The nurse tree species Betula pendula and Larix x eurolepis did improve stem form in some target tree species, but had a minor effect on survival and growth. The open conditions before crown closure of nurse trees strongly influence seedling performance and so delayed planting of target tree species may provide a means to avoid those conditions. Survival and growth differed greatly among the tree species. Besides the two nurse tree species mentioned above, high survival was found in Picea abies and Quercus robur and intermediate survival in Fagus sylvaticaTilia cordata, and in the N-fixing nurse tree Alnus glutinosa. Survival was low in the target tree species Fraxinus excelsior L. and Prunus avium. For restoration practitioners, our results illustrate the potential of using nurse trees for rapidly building a new forest structure and simultaneously increase productivity, which might be a cost-effective strategy for forest restoration.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 22, no 6, p. 758-765
Keywords [en]
competition;facilitation;plant–plant interactions;two-story plantation;vegetation control
National Category
Forest Science
Research subject
Technology (byts ev till Engineering), Forestry and Wood Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-41893DOI: 10.1111/rec.12136OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-41893DiVA, id: diva2:801254
Available from: 2015-04-08 Created: 2015-04-08 Last updated: 2019-05-20Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full textabstract

Authority records BETA

Jensen, Anna M.

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Jensen, Anna M.
In the same journal
Restoration Ecology
Forest Science

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 112 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf