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Nitrogen-retention capacity in a fertilized forest after clear-cutting: the effect of forest-floor vegetation
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
2015 (English)In: Canadian Journal of Forest Research, ISSN 0045-5067, E-ISSN 1208-6037, Vol. 45, no 1, p. 130-134Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Forest fertilization with nitrogen (N) has several benefits to society such as increased wood production and carbon sequestration. There are, however, concerns about N leakage, particularly following clear-cutting. The forest-floor vegetation may increase the N retention of forest ecosystems; however, very few studies have quantified the amount of vegetation required. We studied the relationship between vegetation cover and risk of N leakage, estimated by the amounts of ammonium-N and nitrate-N retained on ion-exchange capsules in the soil, during 4 years following the clear-cutting and harvesting of logging residues in a previously fertilized forest in southern Sweden. Previous fertilization increased the amount of nitrate-N captured on the capsules, whereas the amount of ammonium-N decreased. The vascular vegetation cover increased from almost zero to approximately 25% independent of fertilization. The amount of ammonium-N and nitrate-N retained on the capsules was already reduced by 50%-75% at 20% vegetation cover, and by 30%-40% cover, it approached zero, independent of the number of years since clear-cutting. The vegetation may impede tree-seedling establishment, implying a trade-off between seedling growth and N-retention capacity. However, our results indicate that maximum N retention may be achieved at a relatively low vegetation cover, which could be accomplished with less intrusive scarification methods than currently used.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Canadian Science Publishing , 2015. Vol. 45, no 1, p. 130-134
National Category
Forest Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-42076DOI: 10.1139/cjfr-2014-0281OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-42076DiVA, id: diva2:801834
Available from: 2015-04-10 Created: 2015-04-09 Last updated: 2017-12-04Bibliographically approved

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Bergh, Johan

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf