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Adaptation of Forest Management Regimes in Southern Sweden to Increased Risks Associated with Climate Change
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
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2016 (English)In: Forests, ISSN 1999-4907, E-ISSN 1999-4907, Vol. 7, no 1, 8Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Even though the growth rates of most tree species in Sweden is expected to increase in the near future as a result of climate change, increased risks of damage by storms and various pests and pathogens, notably root rot and bark beetles, may also occur. Thus, forest management practices such as changes to thinning regimes, reductions in rotation lengths, and switching to other species (native or exotic) may represent adaptive management strategies to increase the resistance and resilience of Swedish forests to climate change. Clearly, thorough analyses examining the effects of anticipated climatic changes on damage levels, and the potentially relieving effects of possible management adaptations are needed before implementing such changes. In this study, damage caused by storms, root rot and bark beetles (single and in various combinations) under selected climate and management scenarios were simulated in Norway spruce (Pice abies L. Karst) stands. The results indicate that reductions in thinning intensity and rotation lengths could improve both volume production and profitability in southern Sweden. In addition, cultivation of rapidly growing species, such as hybrid larch (Larix × marschlinsii Coaz.) and hybrid aspen (Populus tremula L. × P. tremuloides Michx.), could be as profitable as Norway spruce cultivation, or even more profitable. However, slow-growing species, such as Silver birch (Betula pendula Roth), Downy birch (Betula pubescens Ehrh.) and European beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) indicated low economic output in terms of Land Expectation Value.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 7, no 1, 8
Keyword [en]
storm-felling, bark beetle, root rot, simulation model, forest production, profitability, land expectation value
National Category
Forest Science
Research subject
Technology (byts ev till Engineering), Forestry and Wood Technology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-42069DOI: 10.3390/f7010008ISI: 000369493400003OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-42069DiVA: diva2:801843
Available from: 2015-04-10 Created: 2015-04-09 Last updated: 2016-07-20Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf