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Next-of-kin’s conceptions of medical technology in palliative homecare
Hälsohögskolan, Jönköping.
Hälsohögskolan, Jönköping .
Hälsohögskolan, Jönköping.
Hälsohögskolan, Jönköping.
2012 (English)In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 21, no 13/14, 1868-1877 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Aims and objectives.  Describe next-of-kin’s conceptions of medical technology in palliative homecare.

Background.  Next-of-kin to palliative patients are in an exposed position with increasing responsibility. The more involved they are in the care, the greater caregiver burden they describe. Medical technology has become increasingly common in palliative homecare, and previous research suggests that the devices transform the homes to a hospital ward, thus shifting responsibility from the personnel to the next-of-kin.

Design.  An explorative descriptive design with a phenomenographic approach was chosen to describe qualitatively different conceptions of the phenomenon medical technology.

Method.  Interviews with 15 next-of-kin to patients in palliative homecare were analysed in a seven-step process where 10 conceptions emerged in five description categories.

Results.  Medical technology in palliative homecare required next-of-kin’s responsibility in monitoring or providing practical help. It also implied uncertainty among the next-of-kin because of worries about its safety or because of an improper handling. The technology trespassed on daily life because it restricted and affected the private sphere. Medical technology enabled comfort as it implied security and was a prerequisite for the patient to be cared for at home. It also required an adjustment to comprehend and manage the medical technology.

Conclusions.  Medical technology resulted in an increased caregiver burden and uncertainty among the next-of-kin. Although it meant restrictions and affected their social life, they had great confidence in its possibilities.

Relevance to clinical practice.  It is important to limit the amount of personnel and materials in the home to avoid trespassing on the family’s daily life. Medical personnel also have to be sensitive to what next-of-kin have the strength to do and not use them as informal caregivers.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 21, no 13/14, 1868-1877 p.
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-42608DOI: 10.1111/j.1365-2702.2012.04123.xOAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-42608DiVA: diva2:805623
Available from: 2015-04-15 Created: 2015-04-15 Last updated: 2015-04-16Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • asciidoc
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