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Evolutionary divergence of adult body size and juvenile growth in sympatric subpopulations of a top predator in aquatic ecosystems
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9598-7618
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
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2015 (English)In: American Naturalist, ISSN 0003-0147, E-ISSN 1537-5323, Vol. 186, no 1, 98-110 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Evolutionary theory predicts that different selective regimes may contribute to divergent evolution of body size and growth rate among populations, but most studies have focused on allopatric populations. Here, we studied five sympatric subpopulations of anadromous northern pike (Esox lucius) in the Baltic Sea subjected to allopatric habitats for a short period of their life cycle due to homing behavior. We report differences in adult body size among subpopulations that were in part due to variation in growth rate. Body size of emigrating juveniles also differed among subpopulations, and differences remained when individuals were reared in a common environment, thus indicating evolutionary divergence among subpopulations. Furthermore, a QST-FST comparison indicated that differences had evolved due to divergent selection rather than genetic drift, possibly in response to differences in selective mortality among spawning habitats during the allopatric life stage. Adult and juvenile size were negatively correlated across subpopulations, and reconstruction of growth trajectories of adult fishes suggested that body size differences developed gradually and became accentuated throughout the first years of life. These results represent rare evidence that sympatric subpopulations can evolve differences in key life-history traits despite being subjected to allopatric habitats during only a very short fraction of their life.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 186, no 1, 98-110 p.
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Research subject
Ecology, Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-43212DOI: 10.1086/681597ISI: 000356632700011PubMedID: 26098342OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-43212DiVA: diva2:811730
Available from: 2015-05-13 Created: 2015-05-13 Last updated: 2017-04-18Bibliographically approved

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Tibblin, PetterForsman, AndersKoch-Schmidt, PerNordahl, OscarNilsson, JonasLarsson, Per
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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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