lnu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
‘Time with your mates’ the pleasures (and displeasures) of boys’ Physical Education
University of Auckland, New Zealand.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2922-1993
2014 (English)In: International Association for Physical Education in Higher Education (AIESEP), 10-13 February, 2014, Auckland, New Zealand, 2014Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Although, Foucault’s concept of power has been aptly utilized in post-structural qualitative PE research in recent years (e.g. Gore, 1998; Kirk, 1997; Webb & Macdonald, 2007; Webb, McCaughtry, & MacDonald, 2004; Wright, 1997, 2000), power as producing pleasure is noticeably absent in this body of research. Indeed, Gard (2008), Booth (2009) and Pringle (2010) argue that if critical PE scholars want to change the social influence associated with dominated discourses of masculinity, there is a need to examine the discourses of PE pleasure. This paper explores how boys’ performances of gender in PE articulate with pleasure. By drawing on ethnographic data from an all-boys’ high school I use Foucault’s (1985) discourse/power/pleasure combination to make meanings and understand the boys as masculine subjects. The findings from this study demonstrate how some boys find intrinsic pleasures (e.g. ‘being part of a team’ and spending ‘time with your mates’) and/or ‘emotional’ pleasures (e.g. ‘PE is fun’ and ‘I love PE) from being involved in these activities whereas others seem to be relating their pleasures to instrumental/developmental goals based on discourses of fitness, health and sport (e.g. ‘getting fit’, ‘being healthy’ and ‘better at sport’). Other pleasures seem to stem from constructing themselves in accordance to discursively constructed norms of boys, masculinity and sport. In sum, this paper draws attention to pleasure as an educational, productive practice in boys PE while at the same time offering a critique of such pleasurable moments within this context. That is, PE teachers need to be aware that they are not only enabling boys’ (and girls’) gendered experiences of pleasure through, for instance, play, games and sport, but they are also influential in shaping their understandings about the gendered pleasures (and displeasures) of these.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014.
National Category
Pedagogy
Research subject
Pedagogics and Educational Sciences, Pedagogics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-45609OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-45609DiVA: diva2:844305
Conference
International Association for Physical Education in Higher Education (AIESEP), 10-13 February, 2014, Auckland, New Zealand
Available from: 2015-08-05 Created: 2015-08-05 Last updated: 2016-02-16Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Gerdin, Göran
Pedagogy

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Total: 51 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf