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Waste Heat Recovery in a Cruise Vessel in the Baltic Sea by Using an Organic Rankine Cycle: A Case Study
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Kalmar Maritime Academy.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0372-7195
Lund University.
Lund University, Sweden.
Lund University, Sweden.
2016 (English)In: Journal of engineering for gas turbines and power, ISSN 0742-4795, E-ISSN 1528-8919, Vol. 138, no 1, article id 011702Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Maritime transportation is a significant contributor to SOx,NOx, and particle matter (PM) emissions, and to a lesser extent, of CO2. Recently, new regulations are being enforced in special geographical areas to limit the amount of emissions from the ships. This fact, together with the high fuel prices, is driving the marine industry toward the improvement of the energy efficiency of ships. Although more sophisticated and complex engine designs can improve significantly of the energy systems on ships, waste heat recovery arises as the most effective technique for the reduction of the energy consump- tion. In this sense, it is estimated that around 50% of the total energy from the fuel con- sumed in a ship is wasted and rejected through liquid and gas streams. The primary heat sources for waste heat recovery are the engine exhaust and coolant. In this work, we present a study on the integration of an organic Rankine cycle (ORC) in an existing ship, for the recovery of the main and auxiliary engines (AE) exhaust heat. Experimental data from the engines on the cruise ship M/S Birka Stockholm were logged during a port-to- port cruise from Stockholm to Mariehamn, over a period of 4 weeks. The ship has four main engines (ME) W€artsil€ a 5850kW for propulsion, and four AE 2760kW which areused for electrical generation. Six engine load conditions were identified depending on the ship’s speed. The speed range from 12 to 14 kn was considered as the design condi- tion for the ORC, as it was present during more than 34% of the time. In this study, the average values of the engines exhaust temperatures and mass flow rates, for each load case, were used as inputs for a model of an ORC. The main parameters of the ORC, including working fluid and turbine configuration, were optimized based on the criteria of maximum net power output and compactness of the installation components. Results from the study showed that an ORC with internal regeneration using benzene as working fluid would yield the greatest average net power output over the operating time. For this situation, the power production of the ORC would represent about 22% of the total elec- tricity consumption on board. These data confirmed the ORC as a feasible and promisingtechnology for the reduction of fuel consumption and CO2 emissions of existing ships.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ASME Press, 2016. Vol. 138, no 1, article id 011702
Keywords [en]
waste heat recovery, whr, shipping, organic rankine cycle, orc, energy
National Category
Marine Engineering
Research subject
Shipping, Maritime Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-45750DOI: 10.1115/1.4031145ISI: 000371127900008Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84939793957OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-45750DiVA, id: diva2:846919
Available from: 2015-08-18 Created: 2015-08-18 Last updated: 2019-08-09Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Reducing ships' fuel consumption and emissions by learning from data
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Reducing ships' fuel consumption and emissions by learning from data
2018 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

In the context of reducing both greenhouse gases and hazardous emissions, the shipping sector faces a major challenge as it is currently responsible for 11% of the transport sector’s anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. Even as emissions reductions are needed, the demand for the transport sector rises exponentially every year. This thesis aims to investigate the potential to use ships’ existing internal energy systems more efficiently. The thesis focusses on making existing ships in real operating conditions more efficient based logged machinery data. This dissertation presents results that can make ship more energy efficient by utilising waste heat recovery and machine learning tools. A significant part of this thesis is based on data from a cruise ship in the Baltic Sea, and an extensive analysis of the ship’s internal energy system was made from over a year’s worth of data. The analysis included an exergy analysis, which also considers the usability of each energy flow. In three studies, the feasibility of using the waste heat from the engines was investigated, and the results indicate that significant measures can be undertaken with organic Rankine cycle devices. The organic Rankine cycle was simulated with data from the ship operations and optimised for off-design conditions, both regarding system design and organic fluid selection. The analysis demonstrates that there are considerable differences between the real operation of a ship and what it was initially designed for. In addition, a large two-stroke marine diesel was integrated into a simulation with an organic Rankine cycle, resulting in an energy efficiency improvement of 5%. This thesis also presents new methods of employing machine learning to predict energy consumption. Machine learning algorithms are readily available and free to use, and by using only a small subset of data points from the engines and existing fuel flow meters, the fuel consumption could be predicted with good accuracy. These results demonstrate a potential to improve operational efficiency without installing additional fuel meters. The thesis presents results concerning how data from ships can be used to further analyse and improve their efficiency, by using both add-on technologies for waste heat recovery and machine learning applications.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Växjö: Linnaeus University Press, 2018. p. 204
Series
Linnaeus University Dissertations ; 339
Keywords
shipping, energy efficiency, orc, machine learning, emissions
National Category
Energy Engineering
Research subject
Shipping, Maritime Science
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-78709 (URN)978-91-88898-22-7 (ISBN)978-91-88898-23-4 (ISBN)
Public defence
2018-12-13, B135, Landgången 4, Sjöfartshögskolan, Kalmar, 10:00 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2018-11-12 Created: 2018-11-07 Last updated: 2018-12-06Bibliographically approved

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Publisher's full textScopushttp://gasturbinespower.asmedigitalcollection.asme.org/article.aspx?doi=10.1115/1.4031145

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Ahlgren, Fredrik

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