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Can tourism be part of the decarbonized global economy?: The costs and risks of alternate carbon reduction policy pathways
Univ Waterloo, Canada ; Western Norway Res Inst, Norway.
Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. Western Norway Res Inst, Norway.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0505-9207
Univ Canterbury, New Zealand ; Univ Oulu, Finland ; Univ Johannesburg, South Africa.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7734-4587
NHTV Breda Univ Appl Sci, Netherlands.
2016 (English)In: Journal of Sustainable Tourism, ISSN 0966-9582, E-ISSN 1747-7646, Vol. 24, no 1, 52-72 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Global leaders agree on the need to substantially decarbonize the global economy by 2050. This paper compares potential costs associated with different policy pathways to achieve tourism sector emission reduction ambitions (-50% by 2035) and transform the sector to be part of the mid-century decarbonizedeconomy (-70% by 2050). Investment in emissions abatement within the tourism sector, combined with strategic external carbon offsets, was found to beapproximately 5% more cost effective over the period 2015-2050 than exclusive reliance on offsetting. The cost to achieve the -50% target through abatement and strategic offsetting, while significant, represents less than 0.1% of the estimated global tourism economy in 2020 and 3.6% in 2050. Distributed equally among all tourists (international and domestic), the cost of a low-carbon tourism sector is estimated at US$11 per trip, equivalent to many current travel fees or taxes. Exclusive reliance on offsetting would expose the sector to extensive and continued carbon liability costs beyond mid-century and could beperceived as climate inaction, increasing reputational risks and the potential for less efficient regulatory interventions that could hinder sustainable tourismdevelopment. Effective tourism sector leadership is needed to develop a strategic tourism policy framework and emission measurement and reporting system.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 24, no 1, 52-72 p.
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Tourism
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-47020DOI: 10.1080/09669582.2015.1107080ISI: 000365762200004OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-47020DiVA: diva2:867066
Available from: 2015-11-04 Created: 2015-11-04 Last updated: 2017-02-17Bibliographically approved

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Gössling, StefanHall, C. Michael
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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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