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Trajectories of the Early-Modern Kingdoms of Eastern Indonesia: Comparative Perspectives
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. (Postcolonial Forum; Concurrences)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-4758-191X
2015 (English)In: EuroSEAS, Wien, 11-14 augusti 2015, EuroSEAS , 2015, 16-16 p.Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

It is generally known that mainland and maritime Southeast Asia experienced a period of development of new states in the fourteenth to sixteenth centuries after the decline of the old charter states (the Khmer Empire, Pagan, Majapahit, the Buddhist kingdom of Dai Viet). For obvious reasons, academic discussions have focused on the principal mainland kingdoms, and the newly Islamized maritime and insular polities (Melaka, Aceh, Demak, Mataram). Factors of state development discussed here have included trade mechanisms, control over manpower, kingship, religion, and the role of external groups (such as Chinese and Europeans). The present paper, by contrast, undertakes a comparative study of the small-sized kingdoms that arose east of Java after the decline of Majapahit in the fifteenth-sixteenth centuries. These include Indianized kingdoms on Bali and Lombok, Islamic states on Sumbawa, the Islamic spice sultanates of Maluku, and a number of loosely structured polities on Flores, Solor, and Timor. The paper asks whether the trajectories of state development in this part of Southeast Asia can be informed by comparison with developments among the larger states; in other words, if the societal changes underpinning integration of the mainland and major archipelagic states are also partly valid for the world east of Java in the early-modern era.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
EuroSEAS , 2015. 16-16 p.
Keyword [en]
kingdoms, East Indonesia, comparative study, early-modern
National Category
History
Research subject
Humanities, History
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-47054OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-47054DiVA: diva2:867607
Conference
EuroSEAS, Wien, 11-14 augusti 2015
Projects
Concurrences, Linnaeus University
Funder
Swedish Research Council
Note

This conference paper is a comparative study of the small kingdoms of Eastern Indonesia which arose in the 15th and 16th centuries. Four regions are studied: Bali-Lombok, Sumbawa, North Maluku, and the Timor region. Their rise and trajectories are also compared with the larger "post-charter" states which arose in Mainland Southeast Asia and Java in the same period. Due to a combination of geopolitical factors, the small eastern polities were able to survive until relatively modern times.

Available from: 2015-11-05 Created: 2015-11-05 Last updated: 2017-02-17Bibliographically approved

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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
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  • Other locale
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Output format
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