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Nontrivial quantum and quantum-like effects in biosystems: Unsolved questions and paradoxes
Ural Fed Univ, Russia.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics. (Int Ctr Math Modelling Phys & Cognit Sci)ORCID iD: 0000-0002-9857-0938
2015 (English)In: Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology, ISSN 0079-6107, E-ISSN 1873-1732, Vol. 119, no 2, 137-161 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Non-trivial quantum effects in biological systems are analyzed. Some unresolved issues and paradoxes related to quantum effects (Levinthal's paradox, the paradox of speed, and mechanisms of evolution) are addressed. It is concluded that the existence of non-trivial quantum effects is necessary for the functioning of living systems. In particular, it is demonstrated that classical mechanics cannot explain the stable work of the cell and any over-cell structures. The need for quantum effects is generated also by combinatorial problems of evolution. Their solution requires a priori information about the states of the evolving system, but within the framework of the classical theory it is not possible to explain mechanisms of its storage consistently. We also present essentials of so called quantum-like paradigm: sufficiently complex bio-systems process information by violating the laws of classical probability and information theory. Therefore the mathematical apparatus of quantum theory may have fruitful applications to describe behavior of bio-systems: from cells to brains, ecosystems and social systems. In quantum-like information biology it is not presumed that quantum information bio-processing is resulted from quantum physical processes in living organisms. Special experiments to test the role of quantum mechanics in living systems are suggested. This requires a detailed study of living systems on the level of individual atoms and molecules. Such monitoring of living systems in vivo can allow the identification of the real potentials of interaction between biologically important molecules. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 119, no 2, 137-161 p.
Keyword [en]
Levinthal paradox, Quantum replicators, Zeno effect, Quantum heat engines, Decoherence, Collapse of the wave function
National Category
Biophysics
Research subject
Natural Science, Mathematics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-47228DOI: 10.1016/j.pbiomolbio.2015.07.001ISI: 000363352900004PubMedID: 26160644OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-47228DiVA: diva2:871555
Available from: 2015-11-16 Created: 2015-11-13 Last updated: 2015-11-16Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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