lnu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Black diasporic filmmaking and the political aesthetics of anti-essentialism
Halmstad University.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0068-8063
2011 (English)In: 9th International Conference of the Collegium for African American Research, "Black States of Desire: Dispossession, Circulation, Transformation", Université Paris Diderot-Paris 7, April 6-9, 2011, 2011Conference paper, (Refereed)
Resource type
Text
Abstract [en]

The fact that Black artists are quite often pigeonholed as spokespersons of Black experience is due to a mimetic understanding of art. Using examples from 1980s Black British diasporic filmmaking I would like to shift the analytical focus from representation and mimesis towards art as interventionist practice. The mysterious deaths of young Black men in police custody form the point of departure for an exploration of memory and mourning in Mysteries in July (Black Audio Film Collective, 1991). Additionally, the Sankofa film collective's Territories (1985) is an exploration of urban space, historiography, heterotopia and Black masculinities, while practices of surveillance and the framing of Blacks via media discourses are addressed in Handsworth Songs (Black Audio Film Collective 1986). These filmic essays, instead of looking at the black male as a given social problem, reflect on its construction through discourses of media and governmentality.

Rather than creating a counter-discourse, these films abstain from trying to depict events "as they really happened". Instead, they deconstruct the hegemonic media discourse through the use of self-reflexive means. While counter practices often assume a unified essentialist stand (as in concepts of Afrocentrism and négritude, for example) I would suggest that in 1980s diasporic Black British filmmaking self-reflexivity is employed as a strategy which might be able to solve a notion of "strategic essentialism" (Spivak). Filmmaking thus serves as an epistemological tool to deal with the gaps, fissures and absences in the national visual archive and in hegemonic historiography while at the same time defying notions of homogeneity and authenticity. The use of self-reflexivity enables the films to reflect on modes of exclusion of the Black subject from hegemonic discourses on the ontology of the image and on the filmic apparatus. To sum up, my paper outlines auteurist strategies of dealing with the exclusion of both the official canon and of the collective visual archive of the nation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2011.
Keyword [en]
Black Audio Film Collective, Handsworth Songs, essay film, diasporic filmmaking
National Category
Studies on Film
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-48379OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-48379DiVA: diva2:883163
Conference
9th International Conference of the Collegium for African American Research, "Black States of Desire: Dispossession, Circulation, Transformation", Université Paris Diderot-Paris 7, April 6-9, 2011
Note

Ej belagd, 160216

Available from: 2011-04-16 Created: 2015-12-16 Last updated: 2016-02-16Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Abstract

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Brunow, Dagmar
Studies on Film

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Total: 20 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf