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Consuming the Tropics : The Tropical Zombie Re-eviscerated in Dead Island
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. (LNUC Concurrences in Postcolonial Studies)
2016 (English)In: Tropical Gothic in Literature and Culture: the Americas / [ed] Justin D. Edwards and Sandra G. T. Vasconcelos, Oxon: Routledge, 2016, 87-102 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

This article investigates the computer game Dead Island as a game about tourism in the tropics but also as a virtual tourism space in itself. The analysis makes use of John Urry’s influential observation that places are intimately related to consumption. Urry proposes that tourist sites in particular are understood as places that can be consumed in various ways. At the same time, they are also places that can consume you. With Urry’s thesis in mind, it can be argued that Dead Island invites the gamer to consume the tropics as a feminine, primitive, eroticized and violent space, as a territory that must be consumed or it will consume you. This article thus argues that the gamer consumes the tropics partly through the exercise of an overtly male and colonial gaze and partly through consumptive violence. This suggests that the game operates as an updated form of what Patrick Brantlinger has termed Imperial Gothic. However, this article further argues that the game never gets comfortable with the sexual and racist politics it arguably endorses. While the tropical space and the bodies that inhabit it allow the gamer to engage in a form of virtual gothic colonialism, the complex narrative attempts to sabotage the Manichean categories that seemingly inform the game’s virtual geography and the semiotics of violence on which the game relies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Oxon: Routledge, 2016. 87-102 p.
Keyword [en]
Gothic, horror, zombie, tourism, thanatourism, game studies, computer games
National Category
Studies on Film
Research subject
Humanities, Film Studies
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-49310ISBN: 978-1-138-91586-2 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-49310DiVA: diva2:897752
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Available from: 2016-01-26 Created: 2016-01-26 Last updated: 2016-02-17Bibliographically approved

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https://www.routledge.com/products/9781138915862

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf