lnu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Implications of a secret temporary organization - the engine change in Saab in 1966
Tampere University of Technology, Finland.
Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing.
2015 (English)In: Paper presented at the 23rd Nordic Academy of Management Conference: "Business in society", Copenhagen, Denmark, August 12-14, 2015, 2015, 98-98 p.Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The objective is to get insights to secret temporary organization. We use project literature in our analysis of the case. We have a longitudinal case study method. Svenska Aeroplan Aktiebolag (later on Saab) entered car manufacturing in 1949 with Saab 92. The company used the 2-stroke engine technology from a German DKW. In 1964 the Saab 96 was voted “Car of the Year” in Sweden. Exports rose from 9500 in 1960 to 16 860 by 1965. However, the domestic sales dropped from 29 000 in 1964 to 26 000 in 1965. No doubt, Saab was losing market. After Volkswagen's had acquired DKW in 1964 the 2-stroke engine was dropped. Saab was the last Western car to have it. The 4-stroke engine was essential for Saab. The motor lab realised that Ford Motor Co.’s (Ford) the new V4 engine was ideal. In 1964, Saab decided to install it in its models in 1966. A small secret organization, called operation Kajsa, tested the engine in Europe for a half a year, rebuilt a number of cars, wrote workshop manuals and purchased systems and parts. There were no major problems to install the new V4 engine. 600 cars were ready for launch in August 1966. In spring Saab had reduced the production. In June Ford informed its dealers in Sweden that the Saab 96 would have its V4 engine. The six-year contract with Ford had no export restrictions. Total sales increased from 37069 cars in 1966 to 45325 in 1967. The switch of the engine seemed to have been well-planned and the internal team worked well. The partners and suppliers were kept well informed. If the project had not been implemented in secrecy would the whole operation Kajsa have failed?

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. 98-98 p.
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Economy, Business administration
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-49807OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-49807DiVA: diva2:903896
Conference
23rd Nordic Academy of Management Conference: "Business in society", Copenhagen, Denmark, August 12-14, 2015
Available from: 2016-02-17 Created: 2016-02-17 Last updated: 2016-04-18Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Anderson, Helén
By organisation
Department of Marketing
Economics and Business

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Total: 71 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf