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Professions in Incentive Society: The Legacy of the 1990s in the Swedish Academic profession
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies. (Forum för professionsforskning (FPF))ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0404-8987
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-1927-1201
2015 (English)In: Differences, Inequalities and socilogical imagination: ESA 2015, 12th Conference of the European sociological Association, Abstract Book, Prague: Institute of Sociology of the Czech Academy of Sciences , 2015, p. 949-Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

The early 1990s are marked by two types of important events on a global scale. First, these were years of economic recession, accompanied by rising unemployment, the widespread ascendance of new forms and techniques of governance, and politically enforced restrictions on public spending.  Second, the early 1990s made knowledge society a common trope, and the global university enrolment ratio rose steeply. The two changes are interlinked –expansion of higher education bolstered youth unemployment, a knowledge economy was held up as a model for western societies – and both impact the system of professions.

This paper examines how the combination of recession and university expansion was accommodated in one specific locale in the system of professions, the case of Swedish university teachers. The academic profession was subjected to the same changes in the forms and techniques of governance as other Swedish professions. But whereas most professions encountered novel forms of steering under conditions of scarcity, the higher education sector was reformed during a period of abundance. Two resource-shocks hit the system. One derived from an increased flow of research funding, the other from the rapidly increasing number of students. We argue that this mode of introduction (1) postponed the perception of adverse effects on the profession, (2) aligned with, accentuated and altered the structure of an internally differentiated but formally unified university system, (3) created specific groups of beneficiaries at different poles of the system – and that, thereby, (4) an incentive-based institutional framework was worked into the tissue of the professional body.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Prague: Institute of Sociology of the Czech Academy of Sciences , 2015. p. 949-
National Category
Sociology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-51060ISBN: 978-80-7330-272-6 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-51060DiVA, id: diva2:913034
Conference
12th European Sociological Association Conference, 25th-28th August 2015, Prague, Czech Republic
Available from: 2016-03-18 Created: 2016-03-18 Last updated: 2018-05-17Bibliographically approved

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Agevall, OlaOlofsson, Gunnar

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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  • asciidoc
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