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Marine bacterial community structure resilience to changes in protist predation under phytoplankton bloom conditions
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. University of Otago, New Zealand. (Ctr Ecol & Evolut Microbial Model Syst)
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. Wageningen University, The Netherlands. (Ctr Ecol & Evolut Microbial Model Syst)
Institut de Ciències del Mar CSIC, Spain.
Pierre-and-Marie-Curie University, France.
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2016 (English)In: The ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, E-ISSN 1751-7370, Vol. 10, no 3, 568-581 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
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Text
Abstract [en]

To test whether protist grazing selectively affects the composition of aquatic bacterial communities, we combined high-throughput sequencing to determine bacterial community composition with analyses of grazing rates, protist and bacterial abundances and bacterial cell sizes and physiological states in a mesocosm experiment in which nutrients were added to stimulate a phytoplankton bloom. A large variability was observed in the abundances of bacteria (from 0.7 to 2.4 x 10(6) cells per ml), heterotrophic nanoflagellates (from 0.063 to 2.7 x 10(4) cells per ml) and ciliates (from 100 to 3000 cells per l) during the experiment (similar to 3-, 45- and 30-fold, respectively), as well as in bulk grazing rates (from 1 to 13 x 10(6) bacteria per ml per day) and bacterial production (from 3 to 379 mu g per Cl per day) (1 and 2 orders of magnitude, respectively). However, these strong changes in predation pressure did not induce comparable responses in bacterial community composition, indicating that bacterial community structure was resilient to changes in protist predation pressure. Overall, our results indicate that peaks in protist predation (at least those associated with phytoplankton blooms) do not necessarily trigger substantial changes in the composition of coastal marine bacterioplankton communities.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 10, no 3, 568-581 p.
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Aquatic Ecology
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URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-51064DOI: 10.1038/ismej.2015.135ISI: 000370472500004PubMedID: 26262814Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84939141929OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-51064DiVA: diva2:913052
Available from: 2016-03-18 Created: 2016-03-18 Last updated: 2016-10-25Bibliographically approved

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Baltar, FedericoPalovaara, JoakimPinhassi, Jarone
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CiteExportLink to record
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