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Effect of type of heat treatment of breastmilk on folate content and pattern.
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala.
Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0387-4312
Umeå University.
Umeå University.
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2014 (English)In: Breastfeeding medicine : the official journal of the Academy of Breastfeeding Medicine, ISSN 1556-8253, E-ISSN 1556-8342, Vol. 9, no 2, 86-91 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

BACKGROUND: Breastmilk is the recommended aliment for preterm infants. Milk banks provide donated breastmilk for the neonatal care of preterm infants when mother's own milk is not is available. To avoid pathogen transmission, donated breastmilk is heat-treated according to different procedures before administration. There is varying information on the effect of heat treatment on folate in breastmilk. Sufficient folate intake, however, is essential for normal growth and brain development. This study determined and compared the effects of different heat treatments on breastmilk folate content and pattern of individual folate forms.

MATERIALS AND METHODS: Donated Swedish breastmilk samples were heat-treated according to three procedures: two low temperature treatments (57°C, 23 minutes; 62.5°C, 12 minutes) and a rapid high temperature treatment (heating to 73°C in boiling water). The folate content and pattern were determined before and after treatment by high-performance liquid chromatography.

RESULTS: The folate content in 38 untreated Swedish breastmilk samples was 150±46 nmol/L. Two different folate vitamers were detected: 5-methyltetrahydrofolate (78±7%) and tetrahydrofolate (22±7%). Heat treatment affected only tetrahydrofolate stability and decreased folate content by 15-24%; however, the effects on folate content did not differ among the investigated heat treatment procedures.

CONCLUSIONS: Folate losses during heat treatment of human milk were considered acceptable. Yet, native folate content of heat-treated, non-fortified breastmilk supplied only 25% of the recommended daily intake for preterm infants.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 9, no 2, 86-91 p.
National Category
Food Science
Research subject
Natural Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-51141DOI: 10.1089/bfm.2013.0008PubMedID: 23786311OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-51141DiVA: diva2:913523
Available from: 2016-03-21 Created: 2016-03-21 Last updated: 2016-03-22Bibliographically approved

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Witthöft, Cornelia M.
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf