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Folates and dairy products: a critical update.
Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, Uppsala.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0387-4312
2000 (English)In: Journal of the American College of Nutrition (Print), ISSN 0731-5724, E-ISSN 1541-1087, Vol. 19, no 2 Suppl, 100S-110S p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

In recent years, folates have come into focus due to their protective role against child birth defects, for example, neural tube defects. In addition, folates may have a protective role to play against coronary heart disease and certain forms of cancer. During the last few years most countries have established increased recommended intakes of folates, for example, between 300-400 microg per day for adults. This review of folates in milk and dairy products compares some recent data based on high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses and radioprotein-binding assays, with previous data based on microbiological assays. All three methods show similar ranges for folates in cow's milk, 5-10 microg per 100 g, the variation being due to seasonal variations. Data on folates in fermented milk (buttermilk and yogurt) are also similar for these methods. Different starter cultures, however, might explain some of the variations in folate content and folate forms. Most cheese varieties contain between 10 microg and 40 microg folate per kg, with slightly higher values for whey cheese. Ripened soft cheeses may contain up to 100 microg folate per 100 g. Most previous and recent studies using HPLC indicate that 5-methyl-tetrahydrofolate (5-methyl-THF) is the major folate form in milk, but more studies are needed concerning folate forms in other, especially fermented dairy products. Relatively new data on actual concentrations in different dairy products show folate-binding proteins (FBP) to occur in unprocessed milk, but also in pasteurised milk, spray-dried skim milk powder and whey. In contrast, UHT milk, fermented milk and most cheeses only contain low levels or trace amounts.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2000. Vol. 19, no 2 Suppl, 100S-110S p.
National Category
Food Science
Research subject
Natural Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-51163PubMedID: 10759136OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-51163DiVA: diva2:913546
Available from: 2016-03-21 Created: 2016-03-21 Last updated: 2016-03-22Bibliographically approved

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Witthöft, Cornelia M.
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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
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More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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