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Use of an oral/intravenous dual-label stable-isotope protocol to determine folic acid bioavailability from fortified cereal grain foods in women.
Sveriges lantbruksuniversitet, Uppsala.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0387-4312
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2002 (English)In: Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 0022-3166, E-ISSN 1541-6100, Vol. 132, no 5Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Folic acid fortification, mandatory in the United States, is currently being considered by the UK. The hypothesis that the matrix of some cereal-product vehicles may result in low fortificant bioavailability was tested using a dual oral/intravenous (i.v.) isotopic-label approach, which was evaluated concurrently. Fifteen women received 225 microg oral folate (capsules, fortified white bread and fortified branflakes), mainly as folic acid labeled with (13)C on 6 carbons of the benzoyl ring ((13)C(6)-PteGlu), followed by i.v. injection of 100 microg folic acid labeled with (2)H on 4 hydrogens of the glutamic acid group ((2)H(4)-PteGlu). The urinary excretion ratio (UER) in intact folate of the percentage of labeled oral dose excreted divided by the percentage of i.v. dose excreted was used as the primary index of absorption. The geometric mean (95% confidence interval) UER for folic acid capsules was 3.68 (1.90, 7.14) at 24 h and 2.18 (1.24, 3.83) at 48 h. Because these were significantly in excess of 1.0, indicative of 100% absorption of the oral dose, it was concluded that oral and i.v. labeled folic acid are handled differently by the body and that "absolute" absorption cannot be calculated. Compared with the 48-h UER for folic acid capsules, the "relative" 48-h UER for white bread and branflakes was 0.71 and 0.37, respectively, indicating that some cereal-based vehicles may inhibit absorption of fortificant. However, even the validity of this "relative" approach is questioned.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2002. Vol. 132, no 5
National Category
Food Science
Research subject
Natural Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-51181PubMedID: 11983817OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-51181DiVA: diva2:913563
Available from: 2016-03-21 Created: 2016-03-21 Last updated: 2016-03-22Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf