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Global corporate governance: The maelstrom of increased complexity - is it possible to learn to ride the dragon?
Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Marketing. University of Gävle.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-3323-907X
Luleå University of Technology.
Colorado Tech Univ, USA.
2015 (English)In: Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Sustainable Value Chain in a Dynamic Environment, Euromed Press , 2015, p. 1785-1799Conference paper, Published paper (Refereed)
Resource type
Text
Abstract [en]

In the light of recent corporate scandals company failure is usually explained based on agency theory, leading to the conclusion that corporate boards and regulators must use agency theory to control management better. The authors use institutional theory to problematize this advice. We identify the role of accounting as to give predictability, hence preventing company failure. But this predictability can be questioned; it implies stability. Albeit partly with circumstantial evidence, we question this stability with factors making the conditions for management decision-making volatile, as explained by antecedents, and leading to unmanageable entities. The implications of this volatility have consequences for corporate governance, and question the going-concern assumption, the basis of accounting. Hence, from the dominant explanations that corrupt management, or management with different interests than the principal, leads to company failure, we evolve another chain of cause and effect: volatility, with company failure as a result. It is argued that traditional accounting rituals are unsuitable for many companies. The paper indicates a need for de-institutionalization and reconsidering of accounting practices, and particularly the fundamental assumption of going concern.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Euromed Press , 2015. p. 1785-1799
Keywords [en]
complexity, corporate governance, going-concern, management control, innovation, volatility
National Category
Economics and Business
Research subject
Economy, Ledarskap, entreprenörskap och organisation
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-51595ISI: 000371316100123ISBN: 978-9963-711-37-6 (print)OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-51595DiVA, id: diva2:915414
Conference
8th Annual Conference of the EuroMed-Academy-of-Business, SEP 16-18, 2015, Verona, ITALY
Available from: 2016-03-30 Created: 2016-03-30 Last updated: 2016-05-03Bibliographically approved

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Philipson, Sarah

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf