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Comparing caregiving patterns of older people in poor and good health in Europe
European Centre for Social Welfare Policy and Research, Austria.
European Centre for Social Welfare Policy and Research, Austria.
European Centre for Social Welfare Policy and Research, Austria.
European Centre for Social Welfare Policy and Research, Austria.
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2015 (English)In: Irish Ageing Studies Review, ISSN 1649-9972, Vol. 6, no 1, 50-50 p.Article in journal, Meeting abstract (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background: The question of how health selects into caregiving activities of older people has been largely neglected in previous studies. This aspect is, however, important from an ‘active ageing’ perspective in that social participation can have positive effects on health, thus possibly contributing to primary, secondary and tertiary disease prevention strategies in old-age. This paper aims to address this gap in the literature by analysing participation in two different types of informal caregiving: care to older adults (inside and outside the household) and grandparenting.

Methods: Using longitudinal data from the Survey on Health, Ageing and Retirement in Europe (waves 1, 2 and 4) on people aged 65 years and older from 10 European countries, we analyse differences in factors that determine informal care provision by older people in good health compared to that provided by older people in poor health. We apply logistic regression methods and account for potential individual heterogeneity.

Results: We find that participation in care is significantly correlated with individual characteristics of carers, differing by health status and type of care, while only small differences are found between health groups.

Conclusions: Even though the determinants of informal care giving are not very different between the two considered groups, policies to promote social engagement should take into account older people‘s health, as those with chronic conditions have less capacity to provide care. Further, co-residential carers have been identified as a vulnerable group, due to their lower socio-economic status and risk of social exclusion.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 6, no 1, 50-50 p.
National Category
Gerontology, specializing in Medical and Health Sciences Sociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)
Research subject
Medicine, Gerontology; Social Sciences, Sociology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-51637OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-51637DiVA: diva2:915648
Conference
8th International Association of Gerontology and Geriatrics (IAGG) – European Region (ER) Congress
Available from: 2016-03-30 Created: 2016-03-30 Last updated: 2016-03-31Bibliographically approved

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Barbabella, Francesco
Gerontology, specializing in Medical and Health SciencesSociology (excluding Social Work, Social Psychology and Social Anthropology)

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf