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Population-specific effects of interbreeding and admixture on reproductive decisions and offspring quality
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. (Evolutionary Ecology)
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. (Evolutionary Ecology)
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. (Evolutionary Ecology ; Fish Ecology ; EEMiS)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9598-7618
2016 (English)In: Annales Zoologici Fennici, ISSN 0003-455X, E-ISSN 1797-2450, Vol. 53, no 1-2, p. 55-68Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We investigated interbreeding and admixture in Tetrix subulata grasshoppers from two maternal origin populations that differed in life-history and dispersal traits. We compared reproductive output of females that had been experimentally mated with males from the same or from a different population. Interbreeding affected clutch size and number of clutches; in one population females in the admixed treatment produced smaller clutches, in the other population females in the admixed treatment produced more clutches. Behavioral observations indicated that individuals can discriminate scents emitted by individuals from different populations; such that females might adjust reproductive allocation depending on male origin. However, hatchability of eggs and survival of nymphs were not affected by the mating treatment. Admixture influenced the production of viable offspring in the F2 generation, but the effect was opposite in the two populations of maternal origin. Results suggested that responses to interbreeding and admixture can differ between populations within a species.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 53, no 1-2, p. 55-68
National Category
Ecology Evolutionary Biology
Research subject
Ecology, Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-51998DOI: 10.5735/086.053.0205ISI: 000374707600005Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84965082807OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-51998DiVA, id: diva2:917944
Available from: 2016-04-08 Created: 2016-04-08 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Microevolution in pygmy grasshoppers
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Microevolution in pygmy grasshoppers
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

Knowledge of how spatiotemporal environmental variation impacts ecological and evolutionary processes and contributes to genetic and phenotypic diversity of natural populations is key to understanding and protecting biological diversity. In this thesis I used pygmy grasshoppers to study how environmental conditions, population dynamics, dispersal and admixture may influence genetic structure and diversity, and to evaluate how functionally important variation may affect the ability of populations to cope with novel and changing habitats.

Analyses of AFLP (Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism) markers in Tetrix subulata individuals from 20 sampling locations in Sweden showed significant genetic structure and restricted gene flow among populations. Genetic diversity increased with population size and proportion of long-winged dispersive phenotypes on the island of Öland, but not on the mainland.

A contrasting environment comparative approach (CECA) applied to 20 T. undulata populations suggested that processes associated with environmental change differently influence functional and neutral diversity. Long-winged phenotypes were more common in disturbed than in stable habitats, indicative of recent establishment. Color morph diversity was higher in disturbed environments consistent with the notion that polymorphism promotes establishment success. Conversely, neutral diversity (AFLP) was lower in disturbed habitats, pointing to a stronger eroding effect of genetic drift in disturbed compared to stable habitats.

I compared genetic and morphological variation between sympatric populations of the two species. Populations of the generally dispersive T. subulata were genetically less differentiated compared with the more sedentary T. undulata, suggesting that the latter species has been less influenced by the homogenizing effects of gene flow. Non-parallel body size differences pointed to species-specific drivers of morphological change.

Finally, comparisons of reproductive output of T. subulata females that had been experimentally mated with males from the same or from a different population suggested that responses to interbreeding and genetic admixture can differ in direction and magnitude even between populations within a species, and thus influence whether dispersal translates into gene flow.

My thesis emphasizes the complexity of microevolution and illustrates how the effects of different ecological and evolutionary processes can vary according to disturbance regimes and geographic areas, and differ between closely related sympatric species.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Växsjö: Linnaeus University Press, 2017
Series
Linnaeus University Dissertations ; 295
National Category
Evolutionary Biology
Research subject
Ecology, Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-67729 (URN)978-91-88357-87-8 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-09-22, 18:14 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2017-09-05 Created: 2017-09-04 Last updated: 2017-09-05Bibliographically approved

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Tinnert, JonBerggren, HannaForsman, Anders

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