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Mate choice is not consistent with short-term effects of intraspecific admixture in the common rough woodlouse (Porcellio scaber)
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. (Evolutionary Ecology ; EEMiS)
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. (Evolutonary Ecology, EEMiS, Fish Ecology)ORCID iD: 0000-0001-9598-7618
2016 (English)In: Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4066, E-ISSN 1095-8312, Vol. 119, no 2, 359-369 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Theory posits that individuals should exhibit mate preferences in part based on genetic relatedness such that fitness is maximized. Intraspecific genetic admixture can have different effects depending on the genetic characteristics and evolutionary history of the individuals and populations involved. We investigated whether female mate choice behavior in the common rough woodlouse (Porcellio scaber) matched the fitness consequences of genetic admixture. We found that most females from two populations that were in sequence introduced to one male from each population mated with both males, and further that monandrous females (females that only mated with one male) predominantly mated with males from their own population. To test for effects of genetic admixture, females from four populations were divided into two replicate pairs and assigned to mate either with a male from the same population as the female (pure) or with a male from the other population (admixed). The effect of mating treatment on the proportion of females that produced eggs and hatched young, as well as on the number and viability of offspring depended on female source population. Mating treatment had opposing effects in two of the populations, whereas there were no detectable effects in the other two populations. Contrary to what was expected, the mating patterns did not match the observed effects of genetic admixture. We discuss alternative adaptive and non-adaptive explanations for the observed patterns.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 119, no 2, 359-369 p.
National Category
Ecology Evolutionary Biology
Research subject
Ecology, Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-52000DOI: 10.1111/bij.12811ISI: 000386919000008OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-52000DiVA: diva2:917968
Available from: 2016-04-08 Created: 2016-04-08 Last updated: 2016-11-28Bibliographically approved

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Sunde, JohannaForsman, Anders
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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
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  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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