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Antibacterial effects of nitric oxide on uropathogenic Escherichia coli during bladder epithelial cell colonization: a comparison with nitrofurantoin
Örebro University.
Örebro University.
Örebro University.
Örebro University.
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2016 (English)In: Journal of antibiotics (Tokyo. 1968), ISSN 0021-8820, E-ISSN 1881-1469, Vol. 69, no 3, 183-186 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) is the predominant causative organism of urinary tract infections (UTI) with a high recurrence rate.1 Recurrence of UTI may involve intracellular localization of bacterial colonies within the bladder mucosa, a process that could benefit the bacteria in terms of protection against antibiotics and host immune cells.2, 3 Once internalized, UPEC may multiply and form intracellular bacterial communities with biofilm-like properties4 and/or enter a non-replicating stable and quiescent state that may serve as a source for recurrent UTI.2, 5, 6 A wide range of antimicrobial agents is used for the treatment of UTI but many antibiotics are unable to penetrate biofilm matrix or inhibit bacteria in a metabolically quiescent state. A recent study demonstrated that of seven different functional classes of antibiotics only a few, including nitrofurantoin and some fluoroquinolones, were able to eliminate internalized UPEC within bladder epithelial cells. Nitric oxide (NO) is a small hydrophobic molecule with antibacterial properties that readily diffuses through lipid bilayer membranes. During infection various host cells produce NO enzymatically from inducible nitric oxide synthase and NO has a key role in the innate immune response. It has been shown previously that NO has antibacterial activity against UPEC isolates, including multidrug-resistant extended spectrum beta-lactamase-producing isolates. Although NO can interact directly with bacteria, it can also be oxidized to reactive nitrogen species.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 69, no 3, 183-186 p.
National Category
Pharmacology and Toxicology
Research subject
Biomedical Sciences, Pharmacology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-52187DOI: 10.1038/ja.2015.112PubMedID: 26531685OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-52187DiVA: diva2:922350
Available from: 2016-04-22 Created: 2016-04-22 Last updated: 2016-05-09Bibliographically approved

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Vumma, Ravi
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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
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