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Causes and consequences of intra-specific variation in vertebral number
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. (Evolutionary Ecology;Ctr Ecol & Evolut Microbial Model Syst EEMiS;Fish Ecology)
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. (Evolutionary Ecology;Ctr Ecol & Evolut Microbial Model Syst EEMiS;Fish Ecology)
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. (Evolutionary Ecology;Ctr Ecol & Evolut Microbial Model Syst EEMiS;Fish Ecology)
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. (Ctr Ecol & Evolut Microbial Model Syst EEMiS;Fish Ecology)ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0344-1939
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2016 (English)In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 6, article id 26372Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Intraspecific variation in vertebral number is taxonomically widespread. Much scientific attention hasbeen directed towards understanding patterns of variation in vertebral number among individualsand between populations, particularly across large spatial scales and in structured environments.However, the relative role of genes, plasticity, selection, and drift as drivers of individual variation andpopulation differentiation remains unknown for most systems. Here, we report on patterns, causesand consequences of variation in vertebral number among and within sympatric subpopulations ofpike (Esox lucius). Vertebral number differed among subpopulations, and common garden experimentsindicated that this reflected genetic differences. A QST-FST comparison suggested that populationdifferences represented local adaptations driven by divergent selection. Associations with fitness traitsfurther indicated that vertebral counts were influenced both by stabilizing and directional selectionwithin populations. Overall, our study enhances the understanding of adaptive variation, which iscritical for the maintenance of intraspecific diversity and species conservation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 6, article id 26372
Keywords [en]
Biodiversity, Evolution, Evolutionary ecology, Ichthyology
National Category
Evolutionary Biology Ecology
Research subject
Natural Science, Ecology; Ecology, Evolutionary Biology; Ecology, Aquatic Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-52632DOI: 10.1038/srep26372ISI: 000376236300001PubMedID: 27210072Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84971287174OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-52632DiVA, id: diva2:930340
Projects
EcoChangeAvailable from: 2016-05-23 Created: 2016-05-23 Last updated: 2018-11-16Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Intraspecific diversity of pike (Esox lucius) in the Baltic Sea and new insights on thermoregulation in fish
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Intraspecific diversity of pike (Esox lucius) in the Baltic Sea and new insights on thermoregulation in fish
2018 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Alternative title[sv]
Inomartsvariation hos gädda (Esox lucius) i Östersjön och nya insikter om temperaturreglering hos fisk
Abstract [en]

Fish display a fascinating variation in behavior, morphology and physiology among species, among individuals within species, and within individuals over time. A central quest in ecology and evolution is to understand causes and consequences of such variation. This thesis aims to contribute to this knowledge by: (1) investigating the evolutionary processes that shape intraspecific variation among sympatric subpopulations of pike in coastal areas of the Baltic Sea; and (2) exploring whether fish can utilize sun-basking to regulate body temperature and whether this has any consequences for fitness.

Identifying barriers that delineate populations is a first step towards evaluating the evolutionary origin of intraspecific variation. This thesis reports on genetic population structures among co-existing pike in the coastal Baltic Sea separated by homing behavior, different spawning strategies and geographic barriers. Field studies revealed that these subpopulations also show phenotypic divergence in reproductive and meristic traits. Experimental studies suggested that differentiation among subpopulations likely was a result of divergent selection and local adaptations to spawning grounds. These adaptations that may further reinforce barriers among subpopulations due to a reduced success of immigrant genotypes.

For the second aim of the thesis, we first studied seasonal and diel patterns of activity and vertical migration among the Baltic Sea pike. The results suggested that pike exposed themselves to sunlight during spring and summer, and that body temperatures were positively correlated with sun exposure during these basking events. This was followed by experimental studies on inanimate physical models and a field study on carp which demonstrated that fish can become warmer than ambient water when exposed to sun light, a previously overlooked mechanism for fish thermoregulation, and that the heat gain was positively correlated with growth.

This thesis contributes to our understanding of the origin and maintenance of intraspecific variation among coexisting populations with direct implications for management of pike. It also establishes sun-basking as a novel mechanism for fish to obtain body temperatures in excess of ambient water which could motivate adaptations, both evolutionary and plastic, that optimize heat gain, affect spatiotemporal distributions and biotic interaction within and among species.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Växjö: Linnaeus University Press, 2018. p. 39
Series
Linnaeus University Dissertations ; 340
Keywords
adaptive divergence, Cyprinus carpio, ecology, Esox lucius, evolution, local adaptation, management, thermoregulation, sun-basking, vertical migration
National Category
Evolutionary Biology Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Aquatic Ecology; Ecology, Evolutionary Biology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-78842 (URN)978-91-88898-24-1 (ISBN)978-91-88898-25-8 (ISBN)
Public defence
2018-12-07, Fullriggaren, Landgången 4, Kalmar, 09:30 (English)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2018-11-16 Created: 2018-11-16 Last updated: 2018-11-16Bibliographically approved

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Tibblin, PetterBerggren, HannaNordahl, OscarLarsson, PerForsman, Anders

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