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It was as Good as it Could be: A Family Member's Non-Experiences of Guilt and Shame in End-Of-Life Care
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
Ersta Sköndal University College ; Ersta Hospital.
2015 (English)In: Journal of Palliative Care & Medicine, E-ISSN 2165-7386, Vol. 5, no 5, 1-6 p., 1000232Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Objective: This study is part of a larger project, “Guilt and shame in end-of-life care – the next-of-kin’s perspective”. The aim was to explore and interpret a family member’s situation without feelings of guilt and shame and describe reasons for non-experiences of these feelings.

Methods: An exploratory case study was employed to investigate and achieve an in-depth, in context understanding of the phenomenon from an informant directly involved in the activities being studied. The data material consisted of two in-depth interviews, analyzed in a hermeneutic way in accordance with Gadamer. 

Result: Seven subthemes appeared “The mother received good care with clear planning”, “They became aware of the inevitable death”, “The mother knew how she wanted things to be”, “Mutual understanding and care between mother and daughter”, “They could make the most of the time that was left”, “The family was together during the dying”, and “Both the daughter and her mother could handle and see meaning in the situation”. These subthemes resulted in a main theme: “There wasn’t much we could have done differently. It was as good as it could be”. Three interpretations emerged that can decrease the risk of feelings of guilt and shame: 1) knowing that the loved one is receiving professional care of good quality, 2) family awareness of the situation and trusting and supportive relationship with the professionals, and 3) inner and external resources and open communication with each other.

Conclusion: The study shows the importance of professionals being involved in the family situation, having the courage to be sensitive towards the patient’s and the family member’s requests in situations where there is dying and death. Being aware of the suggested interpretations can decrease the risk of feelings of guilt and shame.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OMICS International , 2015. Vol. 5, no 5, 1-6 p., 1000232
Keyword [en]
Cancer, Guilt, Hermeneutic research, Next-of-kin, Palliative care, Relatives, Shame
National Category
Nursing
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-52649DOI: 10.4172/2165-7386.1000232OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-52649DiVA: diva2:930663
Available from: 2016-05-25 Created: 2016-05-25 Last updated: 2016-10-14Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf