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Self-Concepts and Psychological Well-Being Assessed By Beck Youth Inventory Among Pupils with Reading Difficulties
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Psychology.ORCID iD: 0000-0001-6811-1960
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Psychology.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2608-6204
Linköping University.
2016 (English)In: Reading Psychology, ISSN 0270-2711, E-ISSN 1521-0685, Vol. 37, no 3, p. 449-469Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This study investigated the self-image and psychological well-being in 67 children and adolescents age 10–16 years with severe reading difficulties and/or dyslexia. The participants were assessed with Beck Youth Inventory regarding symptoms of depression, anxiety, and negative self-image. The results showed that the participants do not depict negative self-image and showed few symptoms of depression or anxiety at group level in comparison to a norm group. These results could be seen as contradictory to previous research. A questionnaire regarding self-efficacy was also distributed and showed that the participants had low self-knowledge about their reading impairments. The results were interpreted as a possible increase in knowledge among teachers and subsequent change in pedagogical strategies. In addition, technological advances may have improved the academic situation for dyslexic children. This study was a partial study in a larger project that aimed to evaluate the efficiency of assistive technologies for dyslexic children.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 37, no 3, p. 449-469
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-52884DOI: 10.1080/02702711.2015.1060092OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-52884DiVA, id: diva2:932449
Available from: 2016-06-01 Created: 2016-06-01 Last updated: 2017-11-30Bibliographically approved
In thesis
1. Self-concepts and psychological health among children and adolescents with reading disabilities and the influence of assistive technology
Open this publication in new window or tab >>Self-concepts and psychological health among children and adolescents with reading disabilities and the influence of assistive technology
2017 (English)Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

This thesis includes three empirical studies that have all aimed to increase the understanding of the interactions and connections between self-concepts, reading impairment, psychological health and Assistive Technology (AT). The use of applications in tablets as assistive technology to facilitate reading and compensate for reading impairment and its impact on the participants’ self-concepts and psychological health as well as on their reading abilities was also of interest.

The first study included 67 pupils in school years 4-9. They were assessed by the Beck Youth Inventory (BYI) regarding self-image, anxiety and depression. The results showed no deviance from age-equivalent norm group scores. The second study included 35 pupils in school years 4-6. This study aimed at investigating the transfer effects on decoding and general reading ability after 20 intervention sessions where AT (applications in tablets) were used. Results showed that the decoding ability had progressed at the same rate as that of the norm group. The results also showed that using AT increased motivations to learn, as well as independence and improved family climate. The third study was a randomized control study (RCT) with 137 participants in school years 4, 8 and high school. The results showed that reading impaired children and adolescents to a great extent, but not completely unanimously, did not depict any different self-image or self-esteem than peers with an expected reading ability of the same age. Self-esteem was investigated by the Cultural Free Self Esteem Inventory (CFSEI-3). The CFSEI-3 scores showed no effect by interventions with AT. The results also showed that there were no signs of depression, assessed by BYI, in the investigated groups, but somewhat inconclusive results regarding anxiety where the school-year 4 group depicted higher levels of anxiety.

The results generally showed a more positive depiction than what previous studies within the field have presented, which was interpreted as being due to the development of efficient pedagogical strategies and supportive attitudes in the school context, as well as among family members or peers. 

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Växjö: Linnaeus University Press, 2017
Series
Linnaeus University Dissertations ; 290/2017
Keywords
dyslexia, reading impairment, self-image, self-esteem, assertive technology, reading interventions
National Category
Psychology
Identifiers
urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-67281 (URN)978-91-88357-82-3 (ISBN)
Public defence
2017-09-08, Weber, Hus K, Linnéuniversitetet, Växjö, 13:00 (Swedish)
Opponent
Supervisors
Available from: 2017-08-18 Created: 2017-08-17 Last updated: 2017-08-18Bibliographically approved

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Lindeblad, EmmaSvensson, Idor

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