lnu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Women in charge: Conditions allowing women to break through the glass ceiling in different European countries
Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship.
2016 (English)Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
Abstract [en]

Our thesis focuses on the challenges and opportunities women in Europe are facing during the first years of their career aiming to explore if future female leaders will have to face the glass ceiling, defined as a transparent barrier that keep women from rising above a certain level in corporations, just as the generations before them and if not, what conditions helped them to achieve a leadership position. As women are still less represented in leadership positions, it was equally important to explore the conditions that are holding them back. Therefore, we applied a qualitative research design and interviewed nine female leaders under the age of 42 in four different European countries. Based on the grounded theory approach, we utilized the primary findings from the interviews to conduct a literature review. Our findings showed that mentoring, trainings, structural changes in the workplace, changes in the male role, quotas, work-life balance and performance appraisal increase the chances of women accessing or increase the likelihood of women accessing management positions. Gender-based stereotypes, on the other hand side, have a limiting effect on their advancement. As a matter of fact, several conditions turned out to be ambivalent, thus both restraining and enabling women simultaneously, such as corporate environment, communication and the leadership style. We could not identify any impact (positive or negative) for the concepts of promotion and compensation policies, expectation from society and guilt management. In summary, all mentioned concepts contribute to the continuing existence of the glass ceiling.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. , 73 p.
Keyword [en]
Glass ceiling, gender disparity, female leadership, gender equality, Europe
National Category
Business Administration
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-53143OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-53143DiVA: diva2:934305
Subject / course
Business Administration - Other
Educational program
Leadership and Management in International Context, Master Programme, 60 credits
Supervisors
Examiners
Available from: 2016-06-08 Created: 2016-06-08 Last updated: 2016-06-08Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Giraud, AlexiaWermann, Susann
By organisation
Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship
Business Administration

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Total: 242 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf