lnu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Defining Planktonic Protist Functional Groups on Mechanisms for Energy and Nutrient Acquisition: Incorporation of Diverse Mixotrophic Strategies
Swansea University, UK.
Swansea University, UK.
Alfred Wegener Institute, Germany.
James Hutton Institute, UK ; University of Technology Sydney, Australia.
Show others and affiliations
2016 (English)In: Protist, ISSN 1434-4610, E-ISSN 1618-0941, Vol. 167, no 2, 106-120 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Resource type
Text
Abstract [en]

Arranging organisms into functional groups aids ecological research by grouping organisms (irrespective of phylogenetic origin) that interact with environmental factors in similar ways. Planktonic protists traditionally have been split between photoautotrophic "phytoplankton" and phagotrophic "microzooplankton". However, there is a growing recognition of the importance of mixotrophy in euphotic aquatic systems, where many protists often combine photoautotrophic and phagotrophic modes of nutrition. Such organisms do not align with the traditional dichotomy of phytoplankton and microzooplankton. To reflect this understanding, we propose a new functional grouping of planktonic protists in an ecophysiological context: (i) phagoheterotrophs lacking phototrophic capacity, (ii) photoautotrophs lacking phagotrophic capacity, (iii) constitutive mixotrophs (CMs) as phagotrophs with an inherent capacity for phototrophy, and (iv) non-constitutive mixotrophs (NCMs) that acquire their phototrophic capacity by ingesting specific (SNCM) or general non-specific (GNCM) prey. For the first time, we incorporate these functional groups within a foodweb structure and show, using model outputs, that there is scope for significant changes in trophic dynamics depending on the protist functional type description. Accordingly, to better reflect the role of mixotrophy, we recommend that as important tools for explanatory and predictive research, aquatic food-web and biogeochemical models need to redefine the protist groups within their frameworks. (C) 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 167, no 2, 106-120 p.
Keyword [en]
Plankton functional types (PFTs), phagotroph, phototroph, mixotroph, phytoplankton, microzooplankton
National Category
Ecology
Research subject
Ecology, Aquatic Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-53278DOI: 10.1016/j.protis.2016.01.003ISI: 000374766700002Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84959214157OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-53278DiVA: diva2:935177
Available from: 2016-06-10 Created: 2016-06-10 Last updated: 2016-09-02Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Lundgren, Veronica
By organisation
Department of Biology and Environmental Science
In the same journal
Protist
Ecology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 14 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf