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High metal reactivity and environmental risks at a site contaminated by glass waste
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-3585-2209
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
Kemakta Konsult.
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2016 (English)In: Chemosphere, ISSN 0045-6535, E-ISSN 1879-1298, Vol. 154, 434-443 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Resource type
Text
Abstract [en]

This study addresses the reactivity and risks of metals (Ba, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, Zn, As and Sb) at a Swedish site with large glass waste deposits. Old glassworks sites typically have high total metal concentrations, but as the metals are mainly bound within the glass waste and considered relatively inert, environmental investigations at these kinds of sites are limited. In this study, soil and landfill samples were subjected to a sequential chemical extraction procedure. Data from batch leaching tests and groundwater upstream and downstream of the waste deposits were also interpreted. The sequential extraction revealed that metals in <2 mm soil/waste samples were largely associated with geochemically active fractions, indicating that metals are released from pristine glass and subsequently largely retained in the surrounding soil and/or on secondary mineral coatings on fine glass particles. From the approximately 12,000 m(3) of coarse glass waste at the site, almost 4000 kg of Pb is estimated to have been lost through corrosion, which, however, corresponds to only a small portion of the total amount of Pb in the waste. Metal sorption within the waste deposits or in underlying soil layers is supported by fairly low metal concentrations in groundwater. However, elevated concentrations in downstream groundwater and in leachates of batch leaching tests were observed for several metals, indicating on-going leaching. Taken together, the high metal concentrations in geochemically active forms and the high amounts of as yet uncorroded metal-rich glass, indicate considerable risks to human health and the environment.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 154, 434-443 p.
Keyword [en]
Glass waste, Risk, Metals, Leaching, Sorption
National Category
Environmental Sciences
Research subject
Natural Science, Environmental Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-54678DOI: 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2016.03.125ISI: 000376693700055PubMedID: 27077538Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84962674251OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-54678DiVA: diva2:949738
Available from: 2016-07-22 Created: 2016-07-21 Last updated: 2016-10-05Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
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