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Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a study of the relationship between patients’ feeling of guilt due to their belief of the disease being self inflicted
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
2016 (English)In: 3rd International Conference on Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, July 11-12, 2016, Brisbane, Australia: scientific tracks & abstracts (day 2), OMICS International , 2016, Vol. 6, p. 43-43, article id 3Conference paper, Oral presentation with published abstract (Refereed)
Abstract [en]

Introduction

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is an increasing health problem that affects about 600 million people globally, and it is expected to be the third most common cause of death worldwide by 2020. COPD is a chronic long-term condition that is irrevocable. Cigarette smoking is the most commonly encountered risk factor for COPD, and it has also been shown that passive smoking impairs lung function. When the disease progresses, not only is the lung fiction impaired, but there are also other consequences as physical, psychological and social.

Aim

The aim of the study was to generate a theory, grounded in empirical data, to reveal the main concerns of people who suffer from COPD and how they handle everyday life.

Method

The constant comparative method of grounded theory, developed by Glaser and Strauss (1967), was used. Data was collected by interviewing 23 people with COPD all having different grades of the disease, from mild to severe. 

Findings

A substantive theory was generated showing that the main concern for people suffering from COPD was feelings of guilt due to self-inflicted disease associated with smoking habits. This includes feelings of living in the shadow of death. This core category was linked to five categories termed making sense of existence, adjusting to bodily restrictions, surrendering to faith, making excuses for the smoking related cause, and creating compliance with daily medication. These categories form a pattern of behavior that explains how feelings of guilt were handled by people living with COPD.    

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
OMICS International , 2016. Vol. 6, p. 43-43, article id 3
Series
Journal of Pulmonary & Respiratory Medicine, ISSN 2161-105X
National Category
Health Sciences
Research subject
Health and Caring Sciences, Caring Science
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-55371DOI: 10.4172/2161-105X.C1.010OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-55371DiVA, id: diva2:951907
Conference
COPD 2016: 3rd International Conference on Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Brisbane, Australia, July 11-12, 2016
Available from: 2016-08-10 Created: 2016-08-10 Last updated: 2016-08-16Bibliographically approved

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Lindqvist, Gunilla

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
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  • asciidoc
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