lnu.sePublications
Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Police Personnel Affective Profiles: Differences in Perceptions of the Work Climate and Motivation
National Police Board.
University of Mustansiryah, Irak.
Network for Empowerment and Well-Being.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Psychology. Network for Empowerment and Well-Being ; University of Gothenburg.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0991-9569
Show others and affiliations
2016 (English)In: Journal of Police and Criminal Psychology, ISSN 0882-0783, E-ISSN 1936-6469, Vol. 31, no 1, 2-14 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The affective profile model was used to investigate individual differences in police personnel perceptions about the working climate and its influences on motivation. The Positive Affect, Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) was used to assign police personnel, sworn and non-sworn (N = 595), to four affective profiles: self-fulfilling, low affective, high affective, and self-destructive. The work climate was assessed using the Learning Climate Questionnaire (Management Relations and Style, Time, Autonomy and Responsibility, Team Style, Opportunities to Develop, Guidelines on How to do the Job, and Contentedness). Motivation was evaluated using a modified version (to refer specifically to the individual’s work situation) of the Situational Motivation Scale (intrinsic motivation, external regulation, identified regulation, and amotivation). Self-fulfilling individuals scored higher on all work climate dimensions compared to the other three groups. Compared to low positive affect profiles, individuals with profiles of high positive affect scored higher in intrinsic motivation and identified regulation. Self-destructive individuals scored higher in amotivation. Different aspects of the work climate were related to each motivation dimension among affective profiles. Police personnel may react to their work environment depending on their affective profile. Moreover, the extent to which the work influences police personnel’s motivation is also related to the affective profile of the individual. © 2015, The Author(s).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 31, no 1, 2-14 p.
Keyword [en]
Affective Profiles, Learning Work Climate, Motivation, Police Personnel, Self-Determination Theory
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-56228DOI: 10.1007/s11896-015-9166-5Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84964424938OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-56228DiVA: diva2:957203
Available from: 2016-09-01 Created: 2016-08-31 Last updated: 2017-03-10Bibliographically approved

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full textScopus

Search in DiVA

By author/editor
Schütz, EricaArcher, TrevorGarcia, Danilo
By organisation
Department of Psychology
In the same journal
Journal of Police and Criminal Psychology
Psychology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 111 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf