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The marketplace management of illegal elixirs: illicit consumption of rhino horn
North-West University, South Africa ; National Economics University, Vietnam ; Social Marketing Initiatives, Vietnam.
Social Marketing Initiatives, Vietnam.
Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Organisation and Entrepreneurship. University of Canterbury, New Zealand ; University of Oulu, Finland ; University of Johannesburg, South Africa.ORCID iD: 0000-0002-7734-4587
2016 (English)In: Consumption, markets & culture, ISSN 1025-3866, E-ISSN 1477-223X, Vol. 19, no 4, 353-369 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

This article examines the consumption of illegally traded rhino horn. We conducted a survey on 608 males in Vietnam, a country that is identified as among the world's largest recipients of illicit rhino horn. We find that supposed health benefits, such as body detoxification and hangover treatment, were the most common reasons for rhino horn usage. Consumers also used rhino horn to display economic wealth, acquire social status, and initiate business and political relationships. We illuminate the shift in the perceived place of rhino horn from functional to symbolic: rhino horn is not only supposed to possess curative properties but through its circulation within social and professional networks is also considered part of the consumers’ search for a sense of “self,” a sense of “us,” and the delineation of the “other.” We discuss implications for strategies that serve to reduce or prevent further loss of the rhinoceros.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 19, no 4, 353-369 p.
Keyword [en]
Behavior change, demand reduction, rhino horn, social marketing, South Africa, transformative consumer research, Vietnam, wildlife trade
National Category
Business Administration
Research subject
Economy, Business administration
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-56098DOI: 10.1080/10253866.2015.1108915Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84947206619OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-56098DiVA: diva2:971322
Available from: 2016-09-16 Created: 2016-08-31 Last updated: 2017-02-17Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf