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Spatial ecology and conservation of Manta birostris in the Indo-Pacific
University of California, USA ; The Manta Trust, UK.
Misool Manta Project, Indonesia.
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science. The Manta Trust, UK ; Blue Resources, Sri Lanka.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-2163-1832
Conservation International, Indonesia.
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2016 (English)In: Biological Conservation, ISSN 0006-3207, E-ISSN 1873-2917, Vol. 200, 178-183 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Information on the movements and population connectivity of the oceanic manta ray (Manta birostris) is scarce. The species has been anecdotally classified as a highly migratory species based on the pelagic habitats it often occupies, and migratory behavior exhibited by similar species. As a result, in the absence of ecological data, population declines in oceanic manta have been addressed primarily with international-scale management and conservation efforts. Using a combination of satellite telemetry, stable isotope and genetic analyses we demonstrate that, contrary to previous assumptions, the species appears to exhibit restricted movements and fine-scale population structure. M. birostris tagged at four sites in the Indo-Pacific exhibited no long-range migratory movements and had non-overlapping geographic ranges. Using genetic and isotopic analysis, we demonstrate that the observed movements and population structure persist on multi-year and generational time scales. These data provide the first insights into the long-term movements and population structure of oceanic manta rays, and suggest that bottom-up, local or regional approaches to managing oceanic mantas could prove more effective than existing, international-scale management strategies. This case study highlights the importance of matching the scales at which management and relevant ecological processes occur to facilitate the effective conservation of threatened species.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2016. Vol. 200, 178-183 p.
Keyword [en]
DdRAD sequencing, Marine conservation, Mobulid, Pop-off satellite archival tagging, Stable isotope analysis
National Category
Ecology Evolutionary Biology Zoology
Research subject
Natural Science, Ecology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-56092DOI: 10.1016/j.biocon.2016.05.016ISI: 000381325300020Scopus ID: 2-s2.0-84975254918OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-56092DiVA: diva2:971341
Note

Funding Details: CI, Conservation International

Available from: 2016-09-16 Created: 2016-08-31 Last updated: 2016-11-11Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
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More languages
Output format
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