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The affective profiles in the USA: happiness, depression, life satisfaction, and happiness-increasing strategies
Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Psychology. Univ Gothenburg ; Network Empowerment & Well Being, Gothenburg, Sweden.ORCID iD: 0000-0003-0991-9569
Univ Gothenburg ; Network Empowerment & Well Being, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Univ Gothenburg ; Network Empowerment & Well Being, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Network Empowerment & Well Being, Gothenburg, Sweden.
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2013 (English)In: PeerJ, ISSN 2167-8359, E-ISSN 2167-8359, Vol. 1, e156Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Background. The affective profiles model categorizes individuals as self-fulfilling (high positive affect, low negative affect), high affective (high positive affect, high negative affect), low affective (low positive affect, low negative affect), and self-destructive (low positive affect, high negative affect). The model has been used extensively among Swedes to discern differences between profiles regarding happiness, depression, and also life satisfaction. The aim of the present study was to investigate such differences in a sample of residents of the USA. The study also investigated differences between profiles with regard to happiness-increasing strategies. Methods. In Study I, 900 participants reported affect (Positive Affect Negative Affect Schedule; PANAS) and happiness (Happiness-Depression Scale). In Study II, 500 participants self-reported affect (PANAS), life satisfaction (Satisfaction With Life Scale), and how often they used specific strategies to increase their own happiness (Happiness-Increasing Strategies Scales). Results. The results showed that, compared to the other profiles, self-fulfilling individuals were less depressed, happier, and more satisfied with their lives. Nevertheless, self-destructive individuals were more depressed, unhappier, and less satisfied than all other profiles. The self-fulfilling individuals tended to use strategies related to agentic (e. g., instrumental goal-pursuit), communal (e. g., social affiliation), and spiritual (e. g., religion) values when pursuing happiness. Conclusion. These differences suggest that promoting positive emotions can positively influence a depressive-to-happy state as well as increasing life satisfaction. Moreover, the present study shows that pursuing happiness through strategies guided by agency, communion, and spirituality is related to a self-fulfilling experience described as high positive affect and low negative affect.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 1, e156
Keyword [en]
Life satisfaction, Affective profiles, Happiness-increasing strategies, Negative affect, Happiness, Depression, Subjective well-being, Positive affect
National Category
Psychology
Research subject
Social Sciences, Psychology
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:lnu:diva-56667DOI: 10.7717/peerj.156ISI: 000209189300003PubMedID: 24058884OAI: oai:DiVA.org:lnu-56667DiVA: diva2:972614
Available from: 2016-09-21 Created: 2016-09-21 Last updated: 2017-03-10Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
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More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
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