lnu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 19 of 19
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Ahlstrand, Emma
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Hermansson, Kersti
    Uppsala University.
    Friedman, Ran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Interaction Energies in Complexes of Zn and Amino Acids: A Comparison of Ab Initio and Force Field Based Calculations2017In: Journal of Physical Chemistry A, ISSN 1089-5639, E-ISSN 1520-5215, Vol. 121, no 13, p. 2643-2654Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Zinc plays important roles in structural stabilization of proteins, eniyine catalysis, and signal transduction. Many Zn binding sites are located at the interface between the protein and the cellular fluid. In aqueous solutions, Zn ions adopt an octahedral coordination, while in proteins zinc can have different coordinations, with a tetrahedral conformation found most frequently. The dynainics of Zn binding to proteins and the formation of complexes that involve Zn are dictated by interactions between Zn and its binding partners. We calculated the interaction energies between Zn and its ligands in complexes that mimic protein binding sites and in Zn complexes of water and one or two amino acid moieties, using quantum mechanics (QM) and molecular mechanics (MM). It was found that MM calculations that neglect or only approximate polarizability did not reproduce even the relative order of the QM interaction energies in these complexes. Interaction energies calculated with the CHARMM-Diode polarizable force field agreed better with the ab initio results,:although the deviations between QM and MM were still rather large (40-96 kcallmol). In order to gain further insight into Zn ligand interactions, the free energies of interaction were estimated by QM calculations with continuum solvent representation, and we performed energy decomposition analysis calculations to examine the characteristics of the different complexes. The ligand-types were found to have high impact on the relative strength of polarization and electrostatic interactions. Interestingly, ligand ligand interactions did not play a significant role in the binding of Zn. Finally) analysis of ligand exchange energies suggests that carboxylates could be exchanged with water molecules, which explains the flexibility in Zn:binding dynamics. An exchange between earboxylate (Asp/Glii) and imidazole (His) is less likely.

  • 2.
    Ahlstrand, Emma
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Zukerman Schpector, Julio
    Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Brazil.
    Friedman, Ran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Computer simulations of alkali-acetate solutions: Accuracy of the forcefields in difference concentrations2017In: Journal of Chemical Physics, ISSN 0021-9606, E-ISSN 1089-7690, Vol. 147, p. 1-10, article id 194102Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When proteins are solvated in electrolyte solutions that contain alkali ions, the ions interact mostlywith carboxylates on the protein surface. Correctly accounting for alkali-carboxylate interactionsis thus important for realistic simulations of proteins. Acetates are the simplest carboxylates thatare amphipathic, and experimental data for alkali acetate solutions are available and can be comparedwith observables obtained from simulations. We carried out molecular dynamics simulations of alkali acetate solutions using polarizable and non-polarizable forcefields and examined the ionacetateinteractions. In particular, activity coefficients and association constants were studied in a range of concentrations (0.03, 0.1, and 1M). In addition, quantum-mechanics (QM) based energy decomposition analysis was performed in order to estimate the contribution of polarization, electrostatics, dispersion, and QM (non-classical) effects on the cation-acetate and cation-water interactions. Simulations of Li-acetate solutions in general overestimated the binding of Li+ and acetates. In lower concentrations, the activity coefficients of alkali-acetate solutions were too high, which is suggested to be due to the simulation protocol and not the forcefields. Energy decomposition analysis suggested that improvement of the forcefield parameters to enable accurate simulations of Li-acetate solution scan be achieved but may require the use of a polarizable forcefield. Importantly, simulations with some ion parameters could not reproduce the correct ion-oxygen distances, which calls for caution in thechoice of ion parameters when protein simulations are performed in electrolyte solutions.

  • 3.
    Becconi, Olga
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences. University of Cagliari, Italy.
    Ahlstrand, Emma
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Salis, Andrea
    University of Cagliari, Italy.
    Friedman, Ran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Protein-ion Interactions: Simulations of Bovine Serum Albumin in Physiological Solutions of NaCl, KCl and LiCl2017In: Israel Journal of Chemistry, ISSN 0021-2148, Vol. 57, no 5, p. 403-412Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Specific interactions that depend on the nature of electrolytes are observed when proteins and other molecules are studied by potentiometric, spectroscopic and theoretical methods at high salt concentrations. More recently, it became clear that such interactions may also be observed in solutions that can be described by the Debye-Hückel theory, i.e., at physiological (0.1 mol dm−3) and lower concentrations. We carried out molecular dynamics simulations of bovine serum albumin in physiological solutions at T=300 and 350 K. Analysis of the simulations revealed some differences between LiCl solutions and those of NaCl and KCl. The binding of Li+ ions to the protein was associated with a negative free energy of interaction whereas much fewer Na+ and K+ ions were associated with the protein surface. Interestingly, unlike other proteins BSA does not show a preference to Na+ over K+. Quantum chemical calculations identified a significant contribution from polarisation to the hydration of Li+ and (to a lesser degree) Na+, which may indicate that polarisable force-fields will provide more accurate results for such systems.

  • 4.
    Engdahl, John Gustav
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Skolresultat och fysisk aktivitet: Hur rörelsevanor speglar elevers resultat inom matematik2011Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Rapporten avser att visa på vikten av fysisk aktivitet som en faktor som påverkar skolresultat.

  • 5.
    Friedman, Ran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Electrolyte Solutions and Specific Ion Effects on Interfaces2013In: Journal of Chemical Education, ISSN 0021-9584, E-ISSN 1938-1328, Vol. 90, no 8, p. 1018-1023Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introductory general and physical chemistry courses often deal with colligative properties of solutions and do not discuss nonideal solutions in detail. Yet, a growing body of evidence reveals that even at physiological concentrations electrolyte solutions cannot be treated as ideal when a charged or partially charged solute (such as a protein) is present in the solution. In such cases, the interactions between the salt ions and the solute depend on the specific ions that constitute the electrolyte solution (specific ion effects). For example, the catalytic efficiency of an enzyme may be different in NaCl and KCl solutions. In this article, specific ion effects are reviewed from a historical perspective, and then the current state of knowledge is presented at a qualitative level that is appropriate for second-year or advanced undergraduate science students. Finally, the related nomenclature (Bjerrum ion pairs, Hofmeister series, lyotropic series, and specific ion effects) is analyzed, and some suggestions are made with respect to the terminology, to make it more accessible to students. The material is appropriate for courses where solution chemistry is discussed, for example, in physical chemistry. In addition, it may be included in the chemistry curriculum for life or pharmaceutical sciences.

  • 6.
    Friedman, Ran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Ions and the protein surface revisited: extensive molecular dynamics simulations and analysis of protein structures in alkali-chloride solutions2011In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 115, p. 9213-9223Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Proteins interact with ions in various ways. The surface of proteins has an innate capability to bind ions, and it is also influenced by the screening of the electrostatic potential owing to the presence of salts in the bulk solution. Alkali metal ions and chlorides interact with the protein surface, but such interactions are relatively weak and often transient. In this paper, computer simulations and analysis of protein structures are used to characterize the interactions between ions and the protein surface. The results show that the ion-binding properties of protein residues are highly variable. For example, alkali metal ions are more often associated with aspartate residues than with glutamates, whereas chlorides are most likely to be located near arginines. When comparing NaCl and KCl solutions, it was found that certain surface residues attract the anion more strongly in NaCl. This study demonstrates that protein–salt interactions should be accounted for in the planning and execution of experiments and simulations involving proteins, particularly if subtle structural details are sought after.

  • 7.
    Friedman, Ran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Membrane-Ion Interactions2018In: Journal of Membrane Biology, ISSN 0022-2631, E-ISSN 1432-1424, Vol. 251, no 3, p. 453-460Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biomembranes assemble and operate at the interface with electrolyte solutions. Interactions between ions in solutions and the lipid affect the membrane structure, dynamics and electrostatic potential. In this article, I review some of the experimental and computational methods that are used to study membrane-ions interactions. Experimental methods that account for membrane-ion interactions directly and indirectly are presented first. Then, studies in which molecular dynamics simulations were used to gain an understanding of membrane-ion interactions are surveyed. Finally, the current view on membrane-ion interactions and their significance is briefly discussed.

  • 8.
    Friedman, Ran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Specific Ion and Concentration Effects in Acetate Solutions with Na+, K+ and Cs+2019In: ChemPhysChem, ISSN 1439-4235, E-ISSN 1439-7641, Vol. 20, no 8, p. 1006-1010Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    How salt ions affect solutes and the water beyond the solvation shell is not well understood. Molecular dynamics simulations of alkali-acetate solutions were analysed here in order to examine if, and how, different cations and solute concentrations affect the water structure and the interactions between water and acetates. The results revealed that water structure is perturbed to more than 1 nm away from the acetates and that this effect is more pronounced in physiological than in molar electrolyte concentrations. Analysis of simulations of a soluble protein revealed that the water orientation is perturbed to at least 1.5 nm from the protein structure. Furthermore, modifications to the orientation of water around carboxylate side chains were shown to depend on the local environment on the protein surface, and could extend to well over 1 nm, which may have an effect on protein dynamics during MD simulations in small water boxes.

  • 9.
    Friedman, Ran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    The molecular mechanism behind resistance of the kinase FLT3 to the inhibitor quizartinib2017In: Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics, ISSN 0887-3585, E-ISSN 1097-0134, Vol. 85, no 11, p. 2143-2152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that is a drug target for leukemias. Several potent inhibitors of FLT3 exist, and bind to the inactive form of the enzyme. Unfortunately, resistance due to mutations in the kinase domain of FLT3 limits the therapeutic effects of these inhibitors. As in many other cases, it is not straightforward to explain why certain mutations lead to drug resistance. Extensive fully atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of FLT3 were carried out with an inhibited form (FLT-quizartinib complex), a free (apo) form, and an active conformation. In all cases, both the wild type (wt) proteins and two resistant mutants (D835F and Y842H) were studied. Analysis of the simulations revealed that impairment of protein-drug interactions cannot explain the resistance mutations in question. Rather, it appears that the active state of the mutant forms is perturbed by the mutations. It is therefore likely that perturbation of deactivation of the protein (which is necessary for drug binding) is responsible for the reduced affinity of the drug to the mutants. Importantly, this study suggests that it is possible to explain the source of resistance by mutations in FLT3 by an analysis of unbiased MD simulations.

  • 10.
    Friedman, Ran
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Caflisch, Amedeo
    Department of Biochemistry, University of Zürich.
    Surfactant Effects on Amyloid Aggregation Kinetics2011In: Journal of Molecular Biology, ISSN 0022-2836, E-ISSN 1089-8638, Vol. 414, p. 303-312Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is strong experimental evidence of the influence of surfactants (e.g., fatty acids) on the kinetics of amyloid fibril formation. However, the structures of mixed assemblies and interactions between surfactants and fibril-forming peptides are still not clear. Here, coarse-grained simulations are employed to study the aggregation kinetics of amyloidogenic peptides in the presence of amphiphilic lipids. The simulations show that the lower the fibril formation propensity of the peptides, the higher the influence of the surfactants on the peptide self-assembly kinetics. In particular, the lag phase of weakly aggregating peptides increases because of the formation of mixed oligomers, which are promoted by hydrophobic interactions and favorable entropy of mixing. A transient peak in the number of surfactants attached to the growing fibril is observed before reaching the mature fibril in some of the simulations. This peak originates from transient fibrillar defects consisting of exposed hydrophobic patches on the fibril surface, which provide a possible explanation for the temporary maximum of fluorescence observed sometimes in kinetic traces of the binding of small-molecule dyes to amyloid fibrils.

  • 11.
    Friedman, Ran
    et al.
    University of Zürich, Switzerland.
    Pellarin, R
    Caflisch, A
    Soluble Protofibrils as Metastable Intermediates in Simulations of Amyloid Fibril Degradation Induced by Lipid Vesicles2010In: Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, ISSN 1948-7185, E-ISSN 1948-7185, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 471-474Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Karlsson, Björn C. G.
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Friedman, Ran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Dilution of whisky - the molecular perspective2017In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 7, no 6489Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Whisky is distilled to around 70% alcohol by volume (vol-%) then diluted to about 40 vol-%, and often drunk after further slight dilution to enhance its taste. The taste of whisky is primarily associated with amphipathic molecules, such as guaiacol, but why and how dilution enhances the taste is not well understood. We carried out computer simulations of water-ethanol mixtures in the presence of guaiacol, providing atomistic details on the structure of the liquid mixture. We found that guaiacol is preferentially associated with ethanol, and, therefore, primarily found at the liquid-air interface in mixtures that contain up to 45 vol-% of ethanol. At ethanol concentrations of 59 vol-% or higher, guaiacol is increasingly surrounded by ethanol molecules and is driven to the bulk. This indicates that the taste of guaiacol in the whisky would be enhanced upon dilution prior to bottling. Our findings may apply to other flavour-giving amphipathic molecules and could contribute to optimising the production of spirits for desired tastes. Furthermore, it sheds light on the molecular structure of water-alcohol mixtures that contain small solutes, and reveals that interactions with the water may be negligible already at 89 vol-% of ethanol.

  • 13.
    Katona, Gergely
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lundholm, Ida
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Rodilla, Helena
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Garcia-Bonete, Maria-Jose
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Duelli, Annette
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wahlgren, Weixiao Y
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bourenkov, Gleb
    DESY, European Mol Biol Lab Hamburg Outstn, Germany.
    Vukusic, Josip
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Friedman, Ran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Schneider, Thomas
    DESY, European Mol Biol Lab Hamburg Outstn, Germany.
    Stake, Jan
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Bayesian analysis of non-thermal structural changes induced by terahertz radiation in protein crystals2016In: 2016 41ST INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON INFRARED, MILLIMETER, AND TERAHERTZ WAVES (IRMMW-THZ), IEEE conference proceedings, 2016Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We have periodically (25ms on - 25ms off) illuminated lysozyme crystals with 0.4 THz radiation and simultaneously monitored their X-ray diffraction intensity in order to study non-thermal structural changes in the protein. In this work we analyze the X-ray scaled and unmerged diffraction intensity observations using a multivariate Bayesian model in order to improve the accuracy of the intensity estimates. The diffraction intensity pairs of the illuminated and non-illuminated state show a predominantly positive correlation. The correlation decreases with increasing resolution suggesting that finer slicing and faster sampling of the rocking curve may further improve the accuracy and effect size of structure factor amplitude differences, making the interpretation of structural changes more straightforward. The improved analysis retains the most important structural features described previously (in helix 3) and provide addition details about the B-factor changes close to the substrate binding site.

  • 14.
    Lutic, Doina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Engineering.
    Strand, Michael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Engineering.
    Sanati, Mehri
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Technology and Design. Bioenergiteknik.
    Catalytic properties of oxide nanoparticles applied in gas sensors2007In: TOPICS IN CATALYSIS, ISSN 1022-5528, Vol. 45, no 1-4, p. 105-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A series of gas sensing layers based on indium oxide doped with gold were prepared by using the aerosol technology for deposition as the active contact layer in a metal oxide semiconductor capacitive device. The interaction between the measured species and the insulator surface was quantified as the voltage changes at a constant capacitance of the device. The sensor properties were investigated in the presence of H2, CO, NH3, NO, NO2 and C3H6 at temperatures between 100–400 °C. Significant differences in the morphology of the layer and its sensitivity were noted for different preparation methods and different gas environments.

  • 15. Mezer, A.
    et al.
    Friedman, Ran
    Tel Aviv University, Israel.
    Noivirt, O.
    Nachliel, E.
    Gutman, M.
    The mechanism of proton transfer between adjacent sites exposed to water2005In: J. Chem. Phys. B, Vol. 109, p. 11379-11388Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Pineda De Castro, Luis Felipe
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Dopson, Mark
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Friedman, Ran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Biological Membranes in Extreme Conditions: Anionic Tetraether Lipid Membranes and Their Interactions with Sodium and Potassium2016In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 120, no 41, p. 10628-10634Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Archaea such as Sulfolobus acidocaldarius tolerate extreme temperatures and high acidity and can grow in the presence of toxic metals and low concentrations of Na+ or K+. It is believed that their unique tetraether membranes protect them from harsh environments and allow their survival under such conditions. We used molecular dynamics simulations to study membranes comprising glycerol dialkylnonitol tetraether lipids, which are the main component of S. acidocaldariusmembranes, in solutions containing different concentrations of NaCl and KCl or with Na+ or K+counterions (trace cations, 0 M). Anionic binding sites on the membranes were almost 50% occupied in the presence of counterions. The free energy of cation–phosphate complexation and the residence times of ions near the membranes were found to be both ion- and concentration-dependent. Sodium ions had more favorable interactions with the membranes and a longer residence time, whereas higher cation concentrations led to shorter ion residence times. When only counterions were present in the solutions, large residence times suggested that the membrane may function as a cation-attracting reservoir. The results suggested that the ions can be easily transferred to the cytoplasm as needed, explaining the growth curves of S. acidocaldarius under different salinities and pH.

  • 17.
    Pineda De Castro, Luis Felipe
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences. University of Gdansk, Poland.
    Dopson, Mark
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Friedman, Ran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Biological Membranes in Extreme Conditions: Simulations of Anionic Archaeal Tetraether Lipid Membranes2016In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 11, no 5, article id e0155287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In contrast to the majority of organisms that have cells bound by di-ester phospholipids, archaeal membranes consist of di- and tetraether phospholipids. Originating from organisms that withstand harsh conditions (e.g., low pH and a wide range of temperatures) such membranes have physical properties that make them attractive materials for biological research and biotechnological applications. We developed force-field parameters based on the widely used Generalized Amber Force Field (GAFF) to enable the study of anionic tetraether membranes of the model archaean Sulfolobus acidocaldarius by computer simulations. The simulations reveal that the physical properties of these unique membranes depend on the number of cyclopentane rings included in each lipid unit, and on the size of cations that are used to ensure charge neutrality. This suggests that the biophysical properties of Sulfolobus acidocaldarius cells depend not only on the compositions of their membranes but also on the media in which they grow.

  • 18.
    Todde, Guido
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Friedman, Ran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Activation and Inactivation of the FLT3 Kinase: Pathway Intermediates and the Free Energy of Transition2019In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, ISSN 1520-6106, E-ISSN 1520-5207, Vol. 123, no 26, p. 5385-5394Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aberrant expression of kinases is often associated with pathologies such as cancer and autoimmune diseases. Like other types of enzymes, kinases can adopt active and inactive states, where a shift toward more stable active state often leads to disease. Dozens of kinase inhibitors are, therefore, used as drugs. Most of these bind to either the inactive or active state. In this work, we study the transitions between these two states in FLT3, an important drug target in leukemias. Kinases are composed of two lobes (N- and C-terminal lobes) with the catalytic site in-between. Through projection of the largest motions obtained through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we show that each of the end-states (active or inactive) already possess the ability for transition as the two lobes rotate which initiates the transition. A targeted simulation approach known as essential dynamics sampling (EDS) was used to speed up the transition between the two protein states. Coupling the EDS to implicit-solvent MD was performed to estimate the free energy barriers of the transitions. The activation energies were found in good agreement with previous estimates obtained for other kinases. Finally, we identified FLT3 intermediates that assumed configurations that resemble that of the c-Src nonreceptor tyrosine kinase. The intermediates show better binding to the drug ponatinib than c-Src and the inactive state of FLT3. This suggests that targeting intermediate states can be used to explain the drug-binding patterns of kinases and for rational drug design.

  • 19.
    Todde, Guido
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Friedman, Ran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Conformational modifications induced by internal tandem duplications on the FLT3 kinase and juxtamembrane domains2019In: Physical Chemistry, Chemical Physics - PCCP, ISSN 1463-9076, E-ISSN 1463-9084, Vol. 21, no 34, p. 18467-18476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    he aberrant expression of FLT3 tyrosine kinase is associated primarily with acute myeloid leukaemia. This blood malignancy is often related to the onset of internal tandem duplications (ITDs) in the native sequence of the protein. The ITDs occur mainly in the juxtamembrane domain of the protein and alter the normal activity of the enzyme. In this work, we have studied the native form of FLT3 and six mutants by molecular dynamics simulations. The catalytic activity of FLT3 is exerted by the tyrosine kinase domain (KD) and regulated by the juxtamembrane (JM) domain. Analysis of the dynamics of these two domains have shown that the introduction of ITDs in the JM domain alters both structural and dynamic parameters. The presence of ITDs allowed the protein to span a larger portion of the conformational space, particularly in the JM domain and the activation loop. The FLT3 mutants were found to adopt more stable configurations than the native enzyme. This was due to the different arrangements assumed by the JM domain. Larger fluctuations of the activation loop were found in four of the six mutants. In the native FLT3, the key residue Tyr(572) is involved in a strong and stable interaction with an ion pair. This interaction, which is thought to keep the JM in place hence regulating the activity of the enzyme, was found to break in all FLT3 mutants.

1 - 19 of 19
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf