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  • 1.
    Ali, Sharafat
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Jonson, Bo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Difficulties associated with the formation of oxynitride glasses2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Ali, Sharafat
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building and Energy Technology.
    Jonson, Bo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Formation and properties of nitrogen rich Ca-Si- (Al)-O-N glasses and Ceramics2014In: Conference proceeding 2014 Spring World Congress on Engineering and Technology, Shanghai, China (April 2014)., 2014, p. 59-59Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 3.
    Ali, Sharafat
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Jonson, Bo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Properties of nitrogen rich mixed La-Pr silicon oxynitride glasses2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Ali, Sharafat
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Jonson, Bo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    J. Pomeroy, Michael
    University of Limerick, Ireland.
    Stuart, Hampshire
    University of Limerick, Ireland.
    Issues associated with the development of transparent oxynitride glasses2015In: Ceramics International, ISSN 0272-8842, E-ISSN 1873-3956, Vol. 41, no 3, p. 3345-3354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Oxynitride glasses and glass ceramics are increasingly recognized as potential materials in specialist applications in modern industrial sectors. Oxynitride glasses have superior mechanical, rheological and optical properties to their oxide glass counterparts. Properties of these glasses can be tailored by changes in nitrogen content and additions of various alkaline-earth and or rare-earth elements. In contrast to oxide glasses, oxynitride glasses are difficult to prepare which adds to production costs. Furthermore, they contain impurities in the form of elemental silicon and silicides, have poor oxidation resistance in air above their glass transition temperatures and have poor transparency in the visible region. This article reviews the above issues in relation to the potential applications of these glasses.

  • 5.
    Allender, Chris J.
    et al.
    Cardiff University, UK.
    Andersson, Håkan S.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences. Cardiff University, UK.
    Brain, Keith R.
    Cardiff University, UK.
    Ramström, Olof
    Cardiff University, UK.
    Preface2001In: Analytica Chimica Acta, ISSN 0003-2670, E-ISSN 1873-4324, Vol. 435, no 1, p. 1-2Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Andersson, Håkan S.
    et al.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences. Cranfield University, UK.
    Piletsky, Sergey A
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Mosbach, Klaus
    Lund University.
    Nicholls, Ian A.
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Koch-Schmidt, Ann-Christin
    University of Kalmar, School of Pure and Applied Natural Sciences.
    Cooperative Binding in Molecularly Imprinted Polymers against (-)-Nicotine.1997Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7. Aveyard,, J
    et al.
    Hajne, J.
    Månsson, Alf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Persson, Malin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    van Delft,, F.C.M.J.M.
    van Zijl, J.
    Snijder, J.
    van den Heuvel,, F.C.
    Nicolau,, D.V.
    Actin motility confinement on micro/nanostructured surfaces.2013In: Proc. SPI 8587, Imaging, Manipulation, and Analysis of Biomolecules, Cells, and Tissues XI, 858722 (February 22, 2013) / [ed] Daniel L. Farkas; Dan V. Nicolau; Robert C. Leif, SPIE - International Society for Optical Engineering, 2013, p. 858722-858727Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Brandin, Jan
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Strand, Michael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Ali, Sharafat
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Aerosolkatalysatorer för industriell gasrening2016Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aerosol catalysts – small particles (with aerodynamic diameter up to 100 m) of catalytically active material suspended in gas – were examined for the intended use of NOx reduction with ammonia (SCR) in smaller industrial plants and boilers as an alternative to SNCR. The aerosol particles are intended to be injected into the flue gas at high temperature, together with ammonia/urea, and then separated on a particulate filter (bag‐type filter) at low temperature. The NOx reduction can occur during the pneumatic transport in the boiler or/and on the catalytically active filter cake. The catalysts must have sufficiently high activity in order to keep down their consumption, they must be cheap enough to be used as a consumable item, and must be harmless to humans and the environment. Two materials were developed during the work as possible candidates: natural zeolites and a FeSO4/activated carbon‐based catalyst. Cost estimates, for a hypothetical 1 MWth plant, shows that a NOx reduction close to 50% economically justify the introduction of SNCR for small plants (<25 GWh, NOx reductions levels between 30‐50% and 2 in stoichiometric ratio), both for the use of urea and liquid anhydrous ammonia with the percent NOx fee of 50 SEK/kg. The result is modest, at best 15‐20% cost reduction compared to no action. Raised tariffs to 60 SEK/kg NOx will improved the situation, but the results are still modest. When the aerosol catalysts was used in the cost estimate, and an assumed NOx reduction degree of 85% was supposed to be reached, good results were obtained at low catalyst costs (0.5‐2 SEK/kg). However the plant can handle at most a cost of 4 SEK/kg. Estimated cost for the aerosol catalyst is in the range of 10 SEK/kg. In order to be economically attractive, the catalyst should be recycled, thereby lowering the cost of catalyst consumption.

  • 9.
    Bring, Torun
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Technology and Design. kemi.
    Jonson, Bo
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Technology and Design. Kemi.
    Kloo, Lars
    Oorganisk Kemi, KTH.
    Potassium sulfate droplets and the origin of turbidity in alabaster glass2006In: Glass Technology : European Journal of Glass Science and Technology A, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 15-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A study of the criteria required to manufacture multi-component semi-transparent silicate glasses, so called “alabaster” glass, has found that the optical effect is caused by non-crystal¬line potassium sulfate droplets. The droplets were characterized by use of XRD, SEM/EDX and Raman spectroscopy. The size range of the particles is in the order of 5-50 micrometers. It was found that the droplets consisted of potassium sulfate, even if other sulfate compounds were added to the glass. The amount of sulfate compound added, the melting temperature of the furnace and the melting time have significant effect on the optical density of the glass. The optical density of the glass can be correlated to the calculated surface tension of the host glass, suggesting that phase separation of a sulfate enriched liquid phase is part of the mecha¬nism forming the droplets. By adding pigments several different colours can be obtained, but the alabaster effect is not achieved during reducing conditions, thus it seems not possible to produce colours originating from reduced pigments. Pigments tested were Cr, Fe, Co, Cu, Au, Mo/Se, Nd and Ti/Ce/Se.

  • 10.
    Bring, Torun
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Technology and Design. kemi.
    Jonson, Bo
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Technology and Design. Kemi.
    Kloo, Lars
    KTH, oorganisk kemi.
    The origin of turbidity in alabaster glasses2006In: Glass:The art of Science: Sunderland 2006, Society of Glass Technology, Sheffield , 2006Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Bring, Torun
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Technology and Design.
    Jonson, Bo
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Technology and Design.
    Kloo, Lars
    Kemi, KTH.
    Rosdahl, Jan
    Kemi, KTH.
    Colour development in copper ruby alkali silicate glasses: Part 2. The effect of tin (II) oxide and antimony (III) oxide2007In: Glass Technology, Eur J Glass Sci Technol A, Vol. 48, no 3, p. 142-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of Sb3+ and Sn2+ during the heat treatment of copper ruby alkali silicate glasses is investigated. The reducing power of SnO and Sb2O3 with respect to Cu is investigated and it is concluded that SnO has the strongest reducing capability. When Cu2O and SnO concentrations are low, minor additions of Sb2O3 have an observable impact on colour development and and absorbance, as thin pieces of glass develop a bluish tint and larger shift towards longer wavelengths is observed in UV/vis spectra. The differences in colour and spectra are suggested to be caused by differences in size of the colour agent, Cu metal particles.

  • 12.
    Bring, Torun
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Technology and Design.
    Jonson, Bo
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Technology and Design.
    Kloo, Lars
    Kemi, KTH.
    Rosdahl, Jan
    Kemi, KTH.
    Wallenberg, Reine
    Materialkemi, LTH.
    Colour development in copper ruby alkali silicate glasses: Part 1. The impact of tin (II) oxide, time and temperature2007In: Glass Technology, Eur J Glass Sci Technol A, Vol. 48, no 2, p. 101-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of the red colour in copper ruby alkali silicate glasses has been studied by means of ultraviolet/visible spectroscopy, TEM and EXAFS. The results show that in both red and slightly overstruck, brownish glasses the colour is due to clusters of metallic copper. Before striking non-coloured glasses contain mainly cuprous ions, Cu+. Tin acts as a reducing agent but also has an accelerating effect on colour development.

  • 13.
    Ekstrand-Hammarström, Barbro
    et al.
    Swedish Def Res Agcy, Linköping.
    Hong, Jaan
    Uppsala University.
    Davoodpour, Padideh
    Uppsala University.
    Sandholm, Kerstin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Nilsson Ekdahl, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences. Uppsala University.
    Bucht, Anders
    Umeå University.
    Nilsson, Bo
    Uppsala University.
    TiO2 nanoparticles tested in a novel screening whole human blood model of toxicity trigger adverse activation of the kallikrein system at low concentrations2015In: Biomaterials, ISSN 0142-9612, E-ISSN 1878-5905, Vol. 51, p. 58-68Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a compelling need to understand and assess the toxicity of industrially produced nanoparticles (NPs). In order to appreciate the long-term effects of NPs, sensitive human-based screening tests that comprehensively map the NP properties are needed to detect possible toxic mechanisms. Animal models can only be used in a limited number of test applications and are subject to ethical concerns, and the interpretation of experiments in animals is also distorted by the species differences. Here, we present a novel easy-to-perform highly sensitive whole-blood model using fresh non-anticoagulated human blood, which most justly reflects complex biological cross talks in a human system. As a demonstrator of the tests versatility, we evaluated the toxicity of TiO2 NPs that are widely used in various applications and otherwise considered to have relatively low toxic properties. We show that TiO2 NPs at very low concentrations (50 ng/mL) induce strong activation of the contact system, which in this model elicits thromboinflammation. These data are in line with the finding of components of the contact system in the protein corona of the TiO2 NPs after exposure to blood. The contact system activation may lead to both thrombotic reactions and generation of bradykinin, thereby representing fuel for chronic inflammation in vivo and potentially long-term risk of autoimmunity, arteriosclerosis and cancer. These results support the notion that this novel whole-blood model represents an important contribution to testing of NP toxicity. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 14.
    Golker, Kerstin
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Karlsson, Björn C. G.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences. Bioorganic & Biophysical Chemistry Laboratory.
    Wiklander, Jesper G.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Rosengren, Annika M.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Nicholls, Ian A.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences. Uppsala university.
    Hydrogen bond diversity in the pre-polymerization stage contributes to morphology and MIP-template recognition–MAA versus MMA2015In: European Polymer Journal, ISSN 0014-3057, E-ISSN 1873-1945, Vol. 66, p. 558-568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This report demonstrates that the diversity of hydrogen bond interactions present in molecularly imprinted polymer pre-polymerization mixtures, typically associated with binding-site heterogeneity, can also contribute to morphological characteristics that may influence polymer–template recognition. Comparisons have been made between a series of bupivacaine molecularly imprinted methacrylic acid (MAA)–ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) copolymers and a series of analogous methyl methacrylate (MMA)–EGDMA copolymers using comprehensive molecular dynamics studies of the respective pre-polymerization mixtures, template–polymer binding studies and detailed BET surface area and BJH porosity analyses. The role of the carboxylic acid functionality of MAA, and in particular the acidic proton, in generating morphological features conducive to analyte access (slit-like rather than ink bottle-like structures) and recognition is discussed.

  • 15.
    Grund Bäck, Lina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Electronic spectra and molar extinction coefficient of Cu2+ in mixed alkali-alkaline earth-silica glasses2015In: Physics and Chemistry of Glasses-European Journal of Glass Science and Technology Part B, ISSN 1753-3562, Vol. 56, no 1, p. 8-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CuO is a very common colorant in blue to turquoise-blue glasses. It is well known that the absorption peak at about 800 nm for silicate glasses is caused by Cu2+, octahedrally coordinated by 6 oxygen ions. It is also known that the [Cu+]/[Cu2+] ratio, the location of the absorption peak and the extinction coefficient of Cu2+ depends on the glass composition. Many investigations have been published with CuO as a colouring agent, but almost none with a mix of Na2O and K2O or CaO and BaO in the base glass. In this study, a base glass composition of 20R2O-10MO-70SiO2 (mol%, R=Na, K and M=Ca, Ba) is used and 0.40 mol% CuO is added. The molar extinction coefficient of Cu2+ is determined for the glasses and peak positions and heights are also presented and discussed.

  • 16.
    Grund Bäck, Lina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology. RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Sweden.
    Ali, Sharafat
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    RISE Research Institutes of Sweden, Sweden;Friedrich Schiller University of Jena, Germany.
    Wondraczek, Lothar
    Friedrich Schiller University of Jena, Germany.
    Jonson, Bo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    X-ray and UV-Vis-NIR absorption spectroscopy studies of the Cu(I) and Cu(II) coordination environments in mixed alkali-lime-silicate glasses2019In: Journal of Non-Crystalline Solids: X, ISSN 2590-1591, article id 100029Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The local structures of Cu(I) and Cu(II) in (20-x)Na2O-xK2O-10CaO-70SiO2 glasses with a copper content of 0.4 mol% have been investigated by Cu K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES). Complementary data for Cu(II) was derived using UV–Vis-NIR spectroscopy. Indication for mainly linear two-fold coordination of the Cu+ ion was found by both EXAFS and XANES, but other coordination between Cu+ and O2– cannot be excluded. The Cu(I)O bond lengths were found to be 1.79–1.83 ± 0.02 Å. EXAFS results showed that Cu(II) was mostly present in a Jahn-Teller distorted environment with oxygen, an octahedron with four shorter Cu(II)O bonds and two longer in axial position. The equatorial bond lengths were found to be 1.89–1.91 ± 0.02 Å and the axial 2.20–2.24 ± 0.02 Å with no effect of the Jahn-Teller distortion of the octahedron when the glass composition was altered.

  • 17.
    Grund, Lina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Ali, Sharafat
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Jonson, Bo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Optical and Physical Properties of CuO-doped mixed alkali: alkaline earth silica glasses2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Grund, Lina
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Technology and Design.
    Jonson, Bo
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Technology and Design.
    Compositional effect on fining and oxygen activity in mixed alkali silicate glasses2007In: ICG 2007: XXI International Congress on Glass, ICG , 2007, p. 320-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Antimony oxide has been used as fining agent for quite some time as a substitute for arsenic oxide in low temperature furnaces, not reaching temperatures high enough to activate sulphate compounds in the fining process. Due to environmentally issues, a substitution of antimony by a less toxic fining agent is becoming more urgent. However, since all the details of the mechanisms of fining/refining with antimony are not fully known, it is necessary to further study the present mechanisms and substitution possibilities.

    This study is done to monitor how changes in glass composition affect the fining result and the oxygen activity of the melt. Numbers of bubbles were determined in order to evaluate the fining efficiency. The oxygen activity measurement is a way to in situ monitor the fining characteristics. Na2O-K2O-CaO-SiO2 glasses were used with constant alkali oxide content but with varying ratio Na2O/K2O. The Sb2O3 content was 0,2 mol% and NaNO3 or KNO3 was added as oxidising agent.

    The oxygen activity has been measured electrochemically, both during the fining process and when the melt was in equilibrium with the surrounding atmosphere. To understand the nitrates contribution to the fining, the oxygen activity was measured in melts both with and without nitrate.

  • 19.
    Jha, Sanjiv K.
    et al.
    East Cent Univ, USA;Univ Southern Mississippi, USA;US Army Corps Engineers, USA.
    Roth, Michael
    Univ Southern Mississippi, USA.
    Todde, Guido
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Buchanan, J. Paige
    US Army Corps Engineers, USA.
    Moser, Robert D.
    US Army Corps Engineers, USA.
    Shukla, Manoj K.
    US Army Corps Engineers, USA.
    Subramanian, Gopinath
    Univ Southern Mississippi, USA.
    Role of Stone-Wales defects or the interfacial interactions among graphene, carbon nanotubes, and Nylon 6: A first-principles study2018In: Journal of Chemical Physics, ISSN 0021-9606, E-ISSN 1089-7690, Vol. 149, no 5, article id 054703Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigate computationally the role of Stone-Wales (SW) defects on the interfacial interactions among graphene, carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and Nylon 6 using density functional theory (DFT) and the empirical force-field. Our first-principles DFT calculations were performed using the Quantum ESPRESSO electronic structure code with the highly accurate van der Waals functional (vdW-DF2). Both pristine and SW-defected carbon nanomaterials were investigated. The computed results show that the presence of SW defects on CNTs weakens the CNT-graphene interactions. Our result that CNT-graphene interaction is much stronger than CNT-CNT interaction indicates that graphene would be able to promote the dispersion of CNTs in the polymer matrix. Our results demonstrate that carbon nanomaterials form stable complexes with Nylon 6 and that the van der Waals interactions, as revealed by the electronic charge density difference maps, play a key stabilizing role on the interfacial interactions among graphene, CNTs, and Nylon 6. Using the density of states calculations, we observed that the bandgaps of graphene and CNTs were not significantly modified due to their interactions with Nylon 6. The Young's moduli of complexes were found to be the averages of the moduli of their individual constituents. Published by AIP Publishing.

  • 20.
    Jonson, Bo
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Technology and Design.
    Devitrification and dilatometric properties of low Tg silicate glasses2007In: ICG 2007: XXI International Congress on Glass, ICG , 2007, p. 320-Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was made in order to investigate the possibilities to substitute lead oxide in glasses suitable to be used as enamels, i e low temperature softening glasses with the ability to be sealed to other glasses by fusing at temperatures of less than 520 - 540 C.

    The glass system chosen for the study can in general terms be described with the mole fractions: 0.25 R´2O – 0.15 R´´O/R´´´2O3 – 0.60SiO2. Among the investigated elements, data for R´= Li, Na, K; R´´= Ba, Sr, Zn, R´´´= B, Al, Bi will be reported.

    Glasses containing higher mole fractions of Li2O were found to devitrify when they were subject to a thermal treatment typical for the one used when fusing enamels. The devitrification characteristics expressed as crystallization temperature and liquidus temperature has been monitored by DSC and gradient furnace thermal analysis. The formed crystalline phases were identified by XRD.

    Thermal expansion () and Tg data were derived from dilatometry. Typical values found are thermal expansion ranging from 11 – 14 * 10-6 K-1 and glass transition temperatures between 410 – 460 C. Measured data could be fitted to the chemical formulation by multiple regression calculation methods in the general equation format: (, Tg) = K +  (cR * fR) in which K = constant, c = oxide mole fraction and f = oxide specific factor. The statistical analysis correlation coefficients (R2) were typically around 0,9.

  • 21.
    Karlsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Glafo – the Glass Research Institute.
    Ali, Sharafat
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building and Energy Technology.
    Strand, Michael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building and Energy Technology.
    Chemical strengthening of flat glass by vapour deposition and in-line alkali metal ion exchange2014Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Glass is a common material in the everyday life. It is widely used in a variety of applications e.g. architectural, automotive, containers, drinking vessels, displays, insulation and optical fibers due to its universal forming ability, transparency, chemical durability, form stability, hardness and relatively low price. Flat glass is a wide market of the glass industry and generally ninety percent of all flat glass produced worldwide is manufactured using the float forming process. There is a large market strive for thinner and stronger glass in order to reduce costs, save energy, reduce environmental footprint, find new applications and to improve the working environment for labour working with mounting flat glass. This study comprises the modification of flat/float glass surface by a novel route; exchange of ionic species originating from in-line vapour deposition of salt compared to the conventional route of immersing the glass in molten salt baths. The aim of this work is to develop a novel process in order to improve the mechanical strength of flat/float glass by introducing external material to the surface in a process with the obvious potential to be automatic in industrial processes. Chemical strengthening has been performed by applying potassium chloride to the glass surface by vapour deposition and thermally activated ion exchange. The method presented here is anticipated to be used in production in the future and would make it possible to produce larger quantities of chemically strengthened flat glass to a considerably lower cost.

  • 22. Karlsson, Stefan
    et al.
    Wondraczek, Lothar
    Ali, Sharafat
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Jonson, Bo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Ion-exchange in Soda-Lime-Silicate Float Glass: Trends in Effective Diffusion Coefficients2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 23.
    Kitaguchi, Yuya
    et al.
    Kyoto University, Japan.
    Habuka, Satoru
    Kyoto University, Japan.
    Okuyama, Hiroshi
    Kyoto University, Japan.
    Hatta, Shinichiro
    Kyoto University, Japan.
    Aruga, Tetsuya
    Kyoto University, Japan.
    Frederiksen, Thomas
    Donostia International Physics Center (DIPC), Spain ; IKERBASQUE, Basque Foundation for Science, Spain.
    Paulsson, Magnus
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering.
    Ueba, Hiromu
    University of Toyama, Japan.
    Controlled switching of single-molecule junctions by mechanical motion of a phenyl ring2015In: Beilstein Journal of Nanotechnology, ISSN 2190-4286, Vol. 6, p. 2088-2095Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mechanical methods for single-molecule control have potential for wide application in nanodevices and machines. Here we demonstrate the operation of a single-molecule switch made functional by the motion of a phenyl ring, analogous to the lever in a conventional toggle switch. The switch can be actuated by dual triggers, either by a voltage pulse or by displacement of the electrode, and electronic manipulation of the ring by chemical substitution enables rational control of the on-state conductance. Owing to its simple mechanics, structural robustness, and chemical accessibility, we propose that phenyl rings are promising components in mechanical molecular devices.

  • 24.
    Lard, Mercy
    et al.
    Lund University.
    ten Siethoff, Lasse
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Generosi, Johanna
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Andersson, Håkan S.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Månsson, Alf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Linke, Heiner
    Lund University.
    Nanowire Interfacing with Molecular Motors: Light Guiding and Tunneling2013Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Lard, Mercy
    et al.
    Lund Univ.
    ten Siethoff, Lasse
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Generosi, Johanna
    Lund Univ / Univ Copenhagen.
    Månsson, Alf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Linke, Heiner
    Molecular Motor Transport through Hollow Nanowires2014In: Nano letters (Print), ISSN 1530-6984, E-ISSN 1530-6992, Vol. 14, no 6, p. 3041-3046Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Biomolecular motors offer self-propelled, directed transport in designed microscale networks and can potentially replace pump-driven nanofluidics. However, in existing systems, transportation is limited to the two-dimensional plane. Here we demonstrate fully one-dimensional (1D) myosin-driven motion of fluorescent probes (actin filaments) through 80 nm wide, Al2O3 hollow nanowires of micrometer length. The motor-driven transport is orders of magnitude faster than would be possible by passive diffusion. The system represents a necessary element for advanced devices based on gliding assays, for example, in lab-on-a-chip systems with channel crossings and in pumpless nanosyringes. It may also serve as a scaffold for bottom-up assembly of muscle proteins into actin ordered contractile units, mimicking the muscle sarcomere.

  • 26.
    Parsland, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Brandin, Jan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Benito, Patricia
    University of Bologna, Italy.
    Hoang Ho, Phuoc
    University of Bologna, Italy.
    Fornasari, Guiseppe
    University of Bologna, Italy.
    Ni-substituted Ba-hexaaluminate as a new catalytic material in steam reforming of tars2017In: Europacat: 13th European Conference on Catalysis, 27-31 August 2017, Florence Italy, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Pivnenko, Kostyantyn
    et al.
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Eriksson, Eva
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in waste paper from danish household waste2014In: Presented at the 5th International Conference on Engineering for Waste and Biomass Valorisation, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, August 25-28, 2014, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Between 1930 and 1993 Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) were extensively used in a variety of applications throughout the world. The applications were generally divided between closed (e.g. electrical transformers) and open. One of the most important open applications was as a solvent in carbonless copy paper. Although production and use of PCBs is heavily restricted in most of the countries, prolonged use of products containing PCBs as well as their physical-chemical characteristics and persistent nature allowed them to remain in the environment. The aim of the present paper was to provide an estimation of PCB concentrations in the waste paper samples from Danish household waste. Additionally, the goal was to estimate total amount of PCBs present in European paper and discuss implications it may have on paper recycling. Paper samples coming from Danish household waste were sorted into more detailed fractions to provide the composition of the waste flow. PCBs were quantified by means of gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) in all of the samples collected. Total concentrations of PCBs in paper and board ranged from 18 to 31 μg/kg. Results extrapolated to the total of European paper show that PCBs in paper represent relatively small amount when compared to other open type applications. Contamination of food with PCBs could potentially be of concern and should be assessed in more details.

  • 28.
    Sanati, Mehri
    et al.
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Technology and Design. Bioenergiteknik.
    Strand, Michael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Engineering.
    Nanocrystalline ruthenium oxide and ruthenium in sensing applications – an experimental and theoretical study2006In: Journal of Nanoparticle Research, ISSN 1388-0764, Vol. 8, no 6, p. 899-910Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this project, we have explored RuO2 and Ru nanoparticles (∼ ∼10 and ∼ ∼5 nm, respectively, estimated from XRD data) to be used as gate material in field effect sensor devices. The particles were synthesized by wet chemical procedure. The capacitance versus voltage characteristics of the studied capacitance shifts to a lower voltage while exposed to reducing gases. The main objectives are to improve the selectivity of the FET sensors by tailoring the dimension and surface chemistry of the nanoparticles and to improve the high temperature stability. The sensors were characterized using capacitance versus voltage measurements, at different frequencies, 500 Hz to 1 MHz, and temperatures at 100–400°C. The sensor response patterns have been found to depend on operating temperature. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses were performed to investigate the oxidation state due to gas exposure. Quantum-chemical computations suggest that heterolytic dissociative adsorption is favored and preliminary computations regarding water formation from adsorbed hydrogen and oxygen was also performed

  • 29.
    Sanati, Mehri
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Engineering.
    Strand, Michael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Engineering.
    New Materials for Chemical and Biosensors2006In: Material and Manufacturing Processes, ISSN 1042-6914, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 275-278Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wide band gap materials such as SiC, AlN, GaN, ZnO, and diamond have excellent properties such as high operation temperature when

    used as field effect devices and a high resonating frequency of the substrate materials used in piezoelectric resonator devices. Integration of FET

    and resonating sensors on the same chip enables powerful miniaturized devices, which can deliver increased information about a gas mixture or

    complex liquid. Examples of sensor devices based on different wide band gap materials will be given.

  • 30.
    Strand, Michael
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Engineering.
    Lutic, Doina
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Technology and Design. University of Kalmar, Department of Technology. Bioenergiteknik.
    Sanati, Mehri
    Växjö University, Faculty of Mathematics/Science/Technology, School of Technology and Design. University of Kalmar, Department of Technology. Bioenergiteknik.
    Catalyst properties of oxide nanoparticles applied in gas sensors manufacturing2006In: 12th Nordic Symposium in Catalysis-May 28-30-Trondheim-Norway, 2006, p. 167-168Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Suriyanarayanan, Subramanian
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Nawaz, Hazrat
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Ndizeye, Natacha
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Nicholls, Ian A.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences. Uppsala University.
    Hierarchical Thin Film Architectures for Enhanced Sensor Performance: Liquid Crystal-Mediated Electrochemical Synthesis of Nanostructured Imprinted Polymer Films for the Selective Recognition of Bupivacaine2014In: Biosensors, ISSN 2079-6374, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 90-110Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanostructured bupivacaine-selective molecularly imprinted 3-aminophenylboronic acid-p-phenylenediamine co-polymer (MIP) films have been prepared on gold-coated quartz (Au/quartz) resonators by electrochemical synthesis under cyclic voltammetric conditions in a liquid crystalline (LC) medium (triton X-100/water). Films prepared in water and in the absence of template were used for control studies. Infrared spectroscopic studies demonstrated comparable chemical compositions for LC and control polymer films. SEM studies revealed that the topologies of the molecularly imprinted polymer films prepared in the LC medium (LC-MIP) exhibit discernible 40 nm thick nano-fiber structures, quite unlike the polymers prepared in the absence of the LC-phase. The sensitivity of the LC-MIP in a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) sensor platform was 67.6 ± 4.9 Hz/mM under flow injection analysis (FIA) conditions, which was ≈250% higher than for the sensor prepared using the aqueous medium. Detection was possible at 100 nM (30 ng/mL), and discrimination of bupivacaine from closely related structural analogs was readily achieved as reflected in the corresponding stability constants of the MIP-analyte complexes. The facile fabrication and significant enhancement in sensor sensitivity together highlight the potential of this LC-based imprinting strategy for fabrication of polymeric materials with hierarchical architectures, in particular for use in surface-dependent application areas, e.g., biomaterials or sensing.

  • 32.
    Wójcik, Natalia A.
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology. Gdańsk University of Technology, Poland.
    Ali, Sharafat
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Möncke, Doris
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology. Alfred University, USA;National Hellenic Research Foundation, Greece.
    Kamitsos, Efstratios
    National Hellenic Research Foundation, Greece.
    Segawa, Hiroyo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology. National Institute for Materials Science, Japan.
    Eriksson, Mirva
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Jonson, Bo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    The influence of Be addition on the structure and thermal properties of alkali-silicate glasses2019In: Journal of Non-Crystalline Solids, ISSN 0022-3093, E-ISSN 1873-4812, Vol. 521, article id 119532Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Be-Na-(Li)-Si oxide glasses containing up to 15 mol% of BeO were prepared. Their structure was characterized by X-ray powder diffraction and Raman as well as infrared spectroscopic techniques, while their chemical compositions were examined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry. All materials were found to be amorphous and contain Al contaminations from minor dissolution of the alumina crucibles. The results of Raman and IR spectroscopies showed that BeO addition to Na-(Li)-Si glass systems resulted in the formation of [BeO4/2]2− tetrahedra which are inserted into the silicate glass network, demonstrating the intermediate glass-forming role of BeO. In parallel, the effective destruction of Si-O-Si bridges was observed by vibrational spectroscopy. The glass transition temperature was studied by Differential Thermal Analysis and found to range from about 431 °C to 551 °C. A significant increase in Tg by 70 °C was found as SiO2 was substituted by up to 15 mol% BeO.

  • 33.
    Xie, Sheng
    et al.
    KTH Royal Instute of Technology;Hunan Univ, Peoples Republic of China.
    Zhou, Juan
    KTH Royal Instute of Technology;Jiangnan Univ, Peoples Republic of China.
    Chen, Xuan
    Univ Massachusetts Lowell, USA.
    Kong, Na
    KTH Royal Instute of Technology.
    Fan, Yanmiao
    KTH Royal Instute of Technology.
    Zhang, Yang
    KTH Royal Instute of Technology.
    Hammer, Gerry
    Univ Washington, USA.
    Castner, David G.
    Univ Washington, USA.
    Ramström, Olof
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences. KTH Royal Instute of Technology;Univ Massachusetts Lowell, USA.
    Yan, Mingdi
    KTH Royal Instute of Technology;Univ Massachusetts Lowell, USA.
    A versatile catalyst-free perfluoroaryl azide-aldehyde-amine conjugation reaction2019In: Materials Chemistry Frontiers, E-ISSN 2052-1537, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 251-256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a tri-component reaction, an electrophilically-activated perfluoroaryl azide, an enolizable aldehyde and an amine react readily at room temperature without any catalysts in solvents including aqueous conditions to yield a stable amidine conjugate. The versatility of this reaction is demonstrated in the conjugation of an amino acid without prior protection of the carboxyl group, and in the synthesis of antibiotic-nanoparticle conjugates.

1 - 33 of 33
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