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  • 1.
    Andersson, Håkan S.
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Jacobsson, Erik
    Uppsala University.
    Eriksson, Camilla
    Uppsala University.
    Hedström, Martin
    Lund University.
    Seth, Henrik
    University of Gothenburg.
    McEvoy, Eric G
    Liverpool John Moores University.
    Sundberg, Per
    University of Gothenburg.
    Strand, Malin
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Göransson, Ulf
    Uppsala University.
    Discovery of peptide toxins in ribbon worms: challenging claims of tetrodotoxin production2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Andersson, Håkan S.
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Jacobsson, Erik
    Uppsala University.
    Eriksson, Camilla
    Uppsala University.
    Rosengren, K. Johan
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Andrén, Per
    Uppsala University.
    Strand, Malin
    Swedish agricultural university (SLU).
    Göransson, Ulf
    Uppsala University.
    Discovery of peptide toxins in the bootlace worm, the world's longest animal2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Friedman, Ran
    et al.
    Department of Biochemistry, University of Zürich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057 Zürich .
    Caflisch, A
    Discovery of plasmepsin inhibitors by fragment-based docking and consensus scoring2009In: ChemMedChem, ISSN 1860-7179, E-ISSN 1860-7187, Vol. 4, no 8, p. 1317-1326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plasmepsins (PMs) are essential proteases of the plasmodia parasites and are therefore promising targets for developing drugs against malaria. We have discovered six inhibitors of PM II by high-throughput fragment-based docking of a diversity set of ∼40 000 molecules, and consensus scoring with force field energy functions. Using the common scaffold of the three most active inhibitors (IC50=2–5 μM), another seven inhibitors were identified by substructure search. Furthermore, these 13 inhibitors belong to at least three different classes of compounds. The in silico approach was very effective since a total of 13 active compounds were discovered by testing only 59 molecules in an enzymatic assay. This hit rate is about one to two orders of magnitude higher than those reported for medium- and high-throughput screening techniques in vitro. Interestingly, one of the inhibitors identified by docking was halofantrine, an antimalarial drug of unknown mechanism. Explicit water molecular dynamics simulations were used to discriminate between two putative binding modes of halofantrine in PM II.

  • 4. Friedman, Ran
    et al.
    Caflisch, A
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Natural Sciences.
    Pepsinogen-like activation intermediate of plasmepsin II revealed by molecular dynamics analysis2008In: Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics, ISSN 0887-3585, E-ISSN 1097-0134, Vol. 73, no 4, p. 814-827Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Friedman, Ran
    et al.
    University of Zürich, Switzerland.
    Caflisch, A.
    The Protonation State of the Catalytic Aspartates in Plasmepsin II2007In: FEBS Letters, ISSN 0014-5793, E-ISSN 1873-3468, Vol. 581, p. 4120-4124Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Markiewicz, Anna
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Björklund, Karin
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Eva
    Faculty Office of School of Business and Economics.
    Generation of nano- and micro-sized organic pollutant emulsions in simulated road runoff2019In: Environment International, Vol. 133, article id 105140Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A wide range of organic pollutants (OPs) are emitted from the road and traffic environment and transported with road runoff to receiving waters. To provide an understanding of the transport routes of OPs in the environment, an investigation was carried out with the aim to determine whether OPs are transported with nano- and microparticles in the form of emulsions. Tests were performed on simulated road runoff, using laboratory prepared mixtures of ultrapure water and specific polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), alkylphenols (APs) and their ethoxylates (APEOs), phthalates, diesel oil (aliphatic hydrocarbons), with and without addition of humic acid (HA) and iron (Fe) colloids. The samples were analysed directly after mixing and after a few days of stabilisation for particle size distribution (PSD) and concentrations of particles in the size range 10 nm–100 μm, and zeta potential > ± 500 mV. Further, after long-term storage to achieve stabilisation, selected samples were investigated for the PSD and particle concentrations in the ranges 10 nm–2 μm, to determine whether stable emulsions had formed. The following simulation mixtures, both mixed and stabilised, were identified as potential emulsions: diesel, APs and APEOs, diesel with APs and APEOS, phthalates, and a mixture of all OPs with and without colloids. Measurements with the Zetasizer and Nanosight instruments imply that the majority of particles in the samples were found in the nano-range of 30–660 nm respectively, and a smaller portion of particles < 28% also measured with Coulter Counter were found to be micro-sized. Higher concentrations of the smallest nanoparticles were found in the mixture of all OPs without colloids added, than in the OP mixture with colloids added. The results indicate that the addition of colloids favours the formation of larger micro-sized emulsions that may break down with time into nano-sized particles. In the mixed samples, the number of micro-sized particles decreased, while the number of nanoparticles increased; this process may also occur in road runoff transportation systems during heavy rain events. This is the first study to indicate that emulsions of OPs may be formed in road runoff, and that emulsions may act as carriers of OPs in urban stormwater.

  • 7.
    Markiewicz, Anna
    et al.
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Hvitt Strömvall, Ann-Margret
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Björklund, Karin
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Kalmykova, Yuliya
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Eva
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Siopi, Anna
    Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden.
    Emissions of organic pollutants from traffic and roads: priority pollutants selection and substance flow analysis2015In: : Presented at the 12th Urban Environment Symposium, Oslo, Norway, June 1-3, 2015, 2015Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Nielsen, Katrine
    et al.
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Mikkelsen, Peter Steen
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Eriksson, Eva
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Removal of stormwater particulates by disc filter technology2013In: Presented at the 8th International Conference on Planning and Technologies for Sustainable Urban Water Management, Lyon, France, June 23-27, 2013, 2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The trend in the Danish society is toward disconnection of stormwater from the combined sewers and, where needed, local treatment using the best available technologies (BAT). The aim here was to assess a fast filtration technology for removal of particulate matter in stormwater with an emphasis on colloidal and nanosized particles. During the project period it rained 8.5 % of the time and the average daily rainfall was 2.9 mm/day. Based on three individual storm events it was found that 95 % of the particles were <10 µm. The nanosized particles (0.01-1.2 µm) were found to be anionic charged and in the size-range of 100 nm. The physical treatment of particle filtration at 10 µm was inadequate to remove the small particles identified in this project. Coagulation with a cationic coagulant and subsequently flocculation is suggested as process improvements technologies.

  • 9.
    Sørud, Mai
    et al.
    Krüger Veolia Water Technologies, Denmark.
    Nielsen, Katrine
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Skau Damskier, Sophie
    Nordvand A/S, Denmark.
    Torpenholt Jørgensen, Alex
    Krüger Veolia Water Technologies, Denmark.
    Fjendbo Petersen, Mette
    Krüger Veolia Water Technologies, Denmark.
    Kofoed Rasmussen, Lone
    Gladsaxe kommune, Denmark.
    Mikkelsen, Peter Steen
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    Eriksson, Eva
    Technical University of Denmark, Denmark.
    DEMFIL - treatment of stormwater for recreational use2013In: Proceedings of the 13th Nordic Wastewater Conference, Malmö: Svenskt Vatten , 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Decoupling of stormwater (road runoff) in a residential area has been implemented in order to reduce flooding and to increase the hydraulic capacity of a lake with a high recreational value. The object here was to evaluate a disc filter technology in combination with a green polymer for flocculation for its feasibility of particle removal. Secondary, the particulate pollution in the separate road runoff should be assessed.The road runoff was found not to be highly contaminated with particle pollution, here measured as turbidity and total suspended solids (TSS). The particles were generally small (< 10 μm) and negatively charged. The disc filtration was hampered during the winter season and by the large fraction of small particles, but supplementing it with flocculation increased the removal efficiencies. The inlet particle concentrations (mg/L) affected the removal efficiencies, and events with inlet concentrations < 10 mg TSS/L or FNU had no statistically significant removal of the particle pollution whereas the events with the highest concentrations yielded among the highest removal efficiencies. The green polymer is as efficient as previously tested commercial coagulant/ flocculent and the disc technology is promising but need to be further tested with higher hydraulic loadings.

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