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  • 1.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Group of Forest Products2018In: Presented at Symposium "Perspectives in Renewables", 4-5 June 2018, BOKU Vienna, Austria, 2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Utilisation of renewable biomass and waste materials in furniture and construction composites2018Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Ahmad, Waqar
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology. Sultan Qaboos Univ, Oman.
    Vakilinejad, Ali
    Sultan Qaboos Univ, Oman;Univ Tehran, Iran.
    Aman, Zachary M.
    Univ Western Australia, Australia.
    Vakili-Nezhaad, G. Reza
    Sultan Qaboos Univ, Oman.
    Thermophysical Study of Binary Systems of tert-Amyl Methyl Ether with n-Hexane and m-Xylene2019In: Journal of Chemical and Engineering Data, ISSN 0021-9568, E-ISSN 1520-5134, Vol. 64, no 2, p. 459-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This work presents the experimentally determined density (rho), viscosity (eta), speed of sound (u), and surface tension (sigma) data for tert-amyl methyl ether (TAME) + n-hexane and TAME + m-xylene systems at several temperatures (298.15, 308.15, 318.15, 323.15, and 328.15 K). These experimentally determined thermophysical data are utilized to compute various excess/deviation parameters such as molar volume (V-E), isentropic compressibility (K-s(E)), speed of sound (u(E)), deviation in viscosity (Delta In eta), isobaric thermal expansion coefficient (alpha(E)(P)), and surface tension (sigma(E)). The inspection of parameters response may interpret the existing specific molecular interactions as well as the mixing behavior of solutions. The critical analysis of observed parametric behavior have unveiled the strong and weak molecular interactions in TAME with m-xylene and TAME with n-hexane systems, respectively.

  • 4.
    Andersson, Sven
    et al.
    SP.
    Bäfver, Linda
    SP.
    Davidsson, Kent
    SP.
    Pettersson, Jens
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Engineering.
    Schmidt, Hans
    SP.
    Strand, Michael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Engineering.
    Yngvesson, Johan
    SP.
    Skrubberintegrerat vått elfilter, WESP2012Report (Other academic)
  • 5. Braovac, Susan
    et al.
    Fackler, Karin
    Bader, Thomas K.
    Ters, Thomas
    Chemical Composition of the Archaeological Oak Wood from the Oseberg Ship2011In: Cultural Heritage Preservation.EWCHP - 2011: Proceedings of the European Workshop on Cultural Heritage Preservation. Berlin, Germany, September 26 to 28, 2011, Fraunhofer IRB Verlag, 2011, p. 156-163Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Bäck, Andreas
    et al.
    Alstom Power Sweden AB.
    Grubbström, Jörgen
    Alstom Power Sweden AB.
    Ecke, Holger
    Vattenfall Research and Development.
    Strand, Michael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Engineering.
    Pettersson, Jens
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Engineering.
    Operation of an Electrostatic Precipitator at a 30 MWth Oxyfuel Plant2011In: International Journal of Plasma Environmental Science and Technology, ISSN 1881-8692, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 141-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The performance of a full-scale ESP was studied at the Vattenfall AB oxyfuel pilot plant in Schwarze Pumpe. The lignite-fired boiler has a 30 MWth top-mounted pulverized coal burner and was operated under conventional air combustion as well as oxyfuel combustion. The ESP was operated with varying numbers of fields in service and at different current/voltage settings. Particle number size distributions downstream the ESP were established on-line in the size range 0.015-10 m, using an electrical mobility spectrometer and an aerodynamic particle sizer. The particle size distribution at oxyfuel operation was qualitatively very similar to the results obtained for air-firing. Gravimetric measurements of total fly ash concentration showed outlet emissions below 5 mg/Nm3 when the ESP was operated with two fields in service at oxyfuel conditions.

  • 7.
    Hemmilä, Venla
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Zabka, Michal
    IKEA Sweden.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Evaluation of dynamic microchamber as a quick factory formaldehyde emission control method for industrial particleboards2018In: Advances in Materials Science and Engineering, ISSN 1687-8434, E-ISSN 1687-8442, article id 4582383Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The most common formaldehyde control method for wood panels in Europe, the perforator method, measures formaldehyde content, while most of the legal requirements in the world are based on emissions. Chamber methods typically used for emission measurements require too much time to reach steady state for factory quality control. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate whether emission values of particleboards measured one day after production would be usable for quality control purposes. The correlation between 1-day and 7-day emission values was determined using a dynamic microchamber (DMC). Three industrial board types that differed in density and emission levels were used for the evaluation. The online emission measuring equipment Aero-laser AL4021 connected to the 1 m3 chamber was used to gain further information on the emission reduction behaviour of the different board types. Only the two particleboard types with higher densities showed good correlation between the 1-day and 7-day emissions. The overall results suggested that 1-day emission values can be used for factory quality control purposes; however, if the initial 1-day values are above the permitted level, extensive evaluation for each individual board type needs to be performed

  • 8.
    Odenbrand, Ingemar
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Brandin, Jan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Deactivation of SCR catalysts used in municipal waste incineration applications2016In: Proceeding of the 17th Nordic Symposium on Catalysis: Book of Abstracts / [ed] Ingemar Odenbrand, Christian Hulteberg, Lund University , 2016, p. 108-109Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 9.
    Parsland, Charlotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Study of the activity of catalysts for the production of high quality biomass gasification gas: with emphasis on Ni-substituted Ba-hexaaluminates2016Licentiate thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The fossil hydrocarbons are not inexhaustible, and their use is not without impact in our need of energy, fuels and hydrocarbons as building blocks for organic materials. The quest for renewable, environmentally more friendly technologies are in need and woody biomass is a promising candidate, well provided in the boreal parts of the world. To convert the constituents of wood into valuable gaseous products, suitable for the end use required, we need a reliable gasification technology. But to become an industrial application on full scale there are still a few issues to take into account since the presence of contaminants in the process gas will pose several issues, both technical and operational, for instance by corrosion, fouling and catalyst deactivation. Furthermore the downstream applications may have very stringent needs for syngas cleanliness depending on its use. Therefore, the levels of contaminants must be decreased by gas cleanup to fulfil the requirements of the downstream applications.

    One of the most prominent problems in biomass gasification is the formation of tars – an organic byproduct in the degradation of larger hydrocarbons. So, tar degrading catalysts are needed in order to avoid tar related operational problems such as fouling but also reduced conversion efficiency. Deactivation of catalysts is generally inevitable, but the process may be slowed or even prevented. Catalysts are often very sensitive to poisonous compounds in the process gas, but also to the harsh conditions in the gasifier, risking problems as coke formation and attrition. Alongside with having to be resistant to any physical and chemical damage, the catalyst also needs to have high selectivity and conversion rate, which would result in a more or less tar-free gas. Commercial tar reforming catalysts of today often contain nickel as the active element, but also often display a moderate to rapid deactivation due to the causes mentioned.

  • 10.
    Rupar-Gadd, Katarina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Wiman, Bo
    Ibrahim, Muhammad Asim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Laohaprapanon, Sawanya
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Hogland, William
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    A theoretical and experimental framework for the study of vegetation as a screen against aerosol pollution2014Report (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    It is well known that vegetation acts a sink for aerosol particles, with the particle-capture efficiency strongly related to vegetation characteristics (such as dimensions of needles and leaves) and to  particle size and aerodynamic conditions. However, there is a need for studies of ways to harness this sink capacity for constructing “green screens” to help reduce aerosol-particle concentrations, and thus health effects, in downwind residential areas. In this report we present a simplified mathematical model for the particle-capture processes involved and use results of model simulations to explore ways to address the problem through experiments with vegetation-filter components (“green filter packs”) placed in a windtunnel. Because of the exploratory nature of our work, the very limited logistics available, and the severe time constraints for the work (a few weeks only were available) the report is shaped as a kind of “scientific narrative” (rather than as a traditional technical paper). A series of tests is described wherein steps are taken towards practical implementation of experimental designs and procedures  based on a simple smoke-aerosol generator and measurements of smoke concentrations upwind and downwind of “green filter packs”. Measurements involve laser-based particle counters, two-stage Nuclepore filter systems, and Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) techniques followed by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry. The main objective of the work was thus to illustrate ways to design experiments – rather than perform full-fledged experimental work – and to show how experimental data can be processed and used to assist in the study of vegetation as “pollution screens”. Despite the very limited time available for the work, the results show that our experimental approach is able to generate relevant information; for instance, a study of the particle-filtration capacity of a “green filter pack” consisting of an arrangement with Scots pine needles yielded interesting data.  Also, the  study suggests opportunities for more systematic comparisons between theory and practice, inasmuch it showed how, in principle, parameters involved in the mathematical model can be quantified. The SPME tests also provided interesting information with respect to chemical characteristics of the smoke-aerosol that was generated for the experiments. However, the tests with Nuclepore-filter sampling as well as the SPME applications showed needs for improving the smoke-generation method so that high and stable smoke-aerosol concentrations can be maintained over long periods (several hours).

     

     

    Our observations and findings imply that several refinements to the experimental design will be needed, including with  respect to methods for assessing the distribution of particle number and mass as a function of particle size (in the present study, the distribution is indicated by two particle-size classes only, 0.5 to 5 μm and >5 μm). Several other needs for improving the modelling as well experimental approach are also discussed in the report. Finally, a few observations on the needs for field-based studies are made together with remarks on the implications of the multi-disciplinary nature of this kind of work, with is linkages to the broader air-pollution context.

  • 11.
    Strand, Michael
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Engineering.
    Gustafsson, Eva
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Engineering.
    Lin, Leteng
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Engineering.
    Yang, Jingjing
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Engineering.
    High-Temperature extraction of aerosol particles from biomass combustion and gasification2011In: European Aerosol Conference 2011, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 12. Ziaei Tabari, Hassan
    et al.
    Nourbakhsh, Amir
    Hosseinpourpia, Reza
    Danesh, Mohammad Amin
    Evaluation of mechanical and morphological behavior of polypropylene/wood fiber nanocomposite prepared by melts compounding2010In: International Conference on Nanotechnology and Biosensors, 28th to 30th December 2010, Hong Kong, Singapore, 2010, Vol. 2, p. 20-23Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Weak flexural properties of wood plastic composites(WPCs) limit their structural application. Recentlyinvestigation of nano particles looks promising to enhancebending properties of WPCs. In this study, the authors haveinvestigated the effect of different concentrations of nanoclay(modified montmorillonite) and coupling agent on themechanical and micro-structural properties of polypropylene/wood-fiber composites. We Bath internal mixer in certainprocessing conditions used for making the samples and then allsamples molded using injection molding for making samplesfor performing mechanical measurements. Samples preparedin four different concentration of nanoclay 0, 1, 3 and 5 wt%(total weight) and two different concentrations of maleicanhydride grafting (MAPP) 5 and 10 wt%. Mechanical resultsindicate that both flexural and impact strength of thecomposites increasing in sample containing 3% nano clay. Inother trend, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) imagesshow better interaction of wood fibers and polymer matrixwhen the authors added 5 wt% MAPP as coupling agent.

1 - 12 of 12
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