lnu.sePublications
Change search
Refine search result
12 1 - 50 of 63
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    TEI Thessaly, Greece.
    Recovery and utilization of wood and rubber at the end of their lifespan to produce innovative products2014In: Development and Business Prospects in Thessaly by Symbiotic Utilization of Agricultural and Industrial Solid Waste to Produce Materials and Energy, November 24, Larissa, Greece, 2014Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Adamopoulos, Stergios
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Foti, Dafni
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Voulgaridis, Elias
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Passialis, Costas
    Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece.
    Manufacturing and properties of gypsum-based products with recovered wood and rubber materials2015In: BioResources, ISSN 1930-2126, E-ISSN 1930-2126, Vol. 10, no 3, 5573-5585 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The experimental production of gypsum-based products (cylindrical samples, solid bricks) using different fractions of wood chips and rubber particles was studied. Recovered rubber and wood materials were mixed with gypsum and water in various proportions to fabricate gypsum-wood and gypsum-rubber cylindrical samples and standard solid bricks with six holes using appropriate molds. It was shown that to manufacture gypsum-wood and gypsum-rubber products with good mechanical strength, coarse fractions of wood and rubber should be used, but the proportion of wood or rubber should not exceed 25%. No thermal conductivity differences were found between the wood-and rubber-type of gypsum products, and particle size and material proportion had no effect. Samples with fine wood and rubber particles present at a lower proportion (25%) exhibited similar sound absorption behavior. The solid bricks had slightly higher strength when loaded at the large surface of their lateral upper side than when loaded at the small surface. The bricks provided better thermal insulation than both the extruded and pressed house bricks but lower than that of insulating bricks. The emission of volatile organic compounds out of the bricks was at an acceptable level according to regulations for construction products.

  • 3.
    Alfredsen, Gry
    et al.
    Norwegian Forest and Landscape Institute, Norway.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Dibdiakova, Janka
    Norwegian Forest and Landscape Institute, Norway.
    Filbakk, Tore
    Norwegian Forest and Landscape Institute, Norway.
    Bollmus, Susanne
    Georg-August-University of Göttingen, Germany.
    Hofstetter, Karin
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Thermogravimetric analysis for wood decay characterisation2012In: European Journal of Wood and Wood Products, ISSN 0018-3768, E-ISSN 1436-736X, Vol. 70, no 4, 527-530 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper focuses on the use of thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) as a fast method for estimating the change of lignocellulosic materials during fungal degradation in laboratory trials. Traditionally, evaluations of durability tests are based on mass loss. However, to gain more knowledge of the reasons for differences in durability and strength between wooden materials, information on the chemical changes is needed. Pinus sylvestris sapwood was incubated with the brown rot fungusGloeophyllum trabeum and the white rot fungus Trametes versicolor. The TGA approach used was found to be reproducible between laboratories. The TGA method did not prove useful for wood deteriorated by white rot, but the TGA showed to be a convenient tool for fast estimation of lignocellulosic components both in sound wood and wood decayed by brown rot.

  • 4.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Mechanical properties of sound and of deteriorated softwood at different length scales: Poromicromechanical modeling and experimental investigations2011Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to its natural origin and its inherent heterogeneities, mechanical properties of wood are highly anisotropic and show a broad variability, not only between different wood species, but also within a tree. Similar to other biological materials, the wood mi- crostructure is well organized and hierarchically structured from the annual rings visible to the naked eye down to the wood polymers cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin at the nanometer-scale. This thesis aims at a deeper understanding of the role of different hi- erarchical levels and their corresponding physical and chemical characteristics in relation to mechanical properties of sound wood and of deteriorated wood. This is achieved by means of micromechanical modeling and experimental analyses.

    This thesis starts with the re-formulation of an existing micromechanical model for the elastic behavior and elastic limit states of wood in the framework of poromechanics. The mechanical role of cell wall water at different hierarchical levels is investigated by means of this model. In a broader sense, the developed model allows to investigate the transition of eigenstresses from the cell wall to the softwood level. Moreover, this poromicromechanical model forms the basis for subsequent consideration of a microscopic failure criterion for lignin for the derivation of softwood failure stresses. The suitability of the modeling approach is underlined by a satisfactory agreement of the model-predicted failure stresses with experimental results of biaxial strength tests on Norway spruce.

    As a result of partly considerably different microstructural characteristics, Common yew exhibits exceptional mechanical properties compared to other softwood species. The re- lationship between microstructure and stiffness properties of Common yew and Norway spruce is investigated by means of the poromicromechanical model and mechanical tests across various length scales. Moreover, this offers the opportunity of a broader model validation. The influence of differences in microfibril angle of the S2 cell wall layer and in mass density between yew and spruce is found to be more dominant than the influence of differences in the annual ring characteristics.

    The suitability of the poromicromechanical model to predict changes in mechanical prop- erties upon fungal decay is demonstrated. For this purpose, relationships between mi- crostructure and mechanical properties of deteriorated wood are experimentally explored. Changes in mechanical properties and in the microstructure, measured at pine wood samples after standard wood durability tests using one brown rot fungus (Gloeophyl- lum trabeum) and one white rot fungus (Trametes versicolor), are presented. Transverse stiffnesses are revealed to be more sensitive to degradation than longitudinal stiffness, particularly as a result of pronounced degradation of hemicelluloses. Moreover, ultrason- ically derived anisotropy ratios of elastic stiffnesses allow to identify certain degradation mechanisms of the two considered fungi. The experimental campaign is complemented by micromechanical modeling. For this purpose, the micromechanical model is extended to take into account degradation-specific microstructural characteristics. 

  • 5. Bader, Thomas K.
    et al.
    Braovac, Susan
    Fackler, Karin
    Hofstetter, Karin
    Stiffness Properties of the Archaeological Oak Wood from the Oseberg Ship2011In: Cultural Heritage Preservation.EWCHP - 2011: Proceedings of the European Workshop on Cultural Heritage Preservation. Berlin, Germany, September 26 to 28, 2011, Fraunhofer IRB Verlag, 2011, 164-170 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    et al.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Braovac, Susan
    University of Oslo, Norway.
    Hofstetter, Karin
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Microstructure-Stiffness Relations of the Ancient Oak Wood from the Oseberg Ship2010In: International Workshop on "Modeling Mechanical Behavior of Wooden Cultural Objects", Krakow, 2010, 22-23 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    et al.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Dastoorian, Foroogh
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria ; University of Tehran, Iran.
    Ebrahimi, Ghanbar
    University of Tehran, Iran.
    Unger, Gerhard
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Lahayne, Olaf
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Hellmich, Christian
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Pichler, Bernhard
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Combined ultrasonic-mechanical characterization of orthotropic elastic properties of an unrefined bagasse fiber-polypropylene composite2016In: Composites Part B: Engineering, ISSN 1359-8368, E-ISSN 1879-1069, Vol. 95, 96-104 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Use of wood-fiber plastics for construction purposes calls for comprehensive understanding of their anisotropic mechanical properties. As a respective contribution, we here report the first-ever complete elasticity characterization of an orthotropic bagasse fiber polypropylene composite, requiring identification of nine independent constants. For this purpose, we carry out characterization in principal material directions. Six diagonal stiffness tensor components are quantified based on ultrasonic longitudinal and shear wave velocity measurements; and three diagonal compliance tensor components are identified as the inverses of three Young’s moduli derived from unloading regimes of quasi-static uniaxial compression tests. Combination of all measurement data in the framework of orthotropic linear elasticity provides access to all off-diagonal stiffness and compliance tensor components, opening the door to quantifying six Poisson’s ratios. 

  • 8.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    et al.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    de Borst, Karin
    University of Glasgow, UK.
    Poroelastic properties of hardwood at different length scales2013In: Poromechanics V: proceedings of the fifth Biot Conference on Poromechanics, July 10-12, 2013, Vienna, Austria / [ed] Christian Hellmich, Bernhard Pichler, Dietmar Adam, Reston: American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2013, 1830-1836 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Hardwoods show a very complex, hierarchically organized microstructure. Slight structural differences at various length scales bring about a huge variety of hardwood species. This motivates the development of a micromechanical model for hardwood. Since differences in the microstructure of the material can be considered in the model, it offers the opportunity to explain the variability of mechanical properties of the whole class of hardwood. The micromechanical model is formulated in the framework of poroelasticity. In this contribution, poroelastic properties at different length scales of the material are discussed. Validation of the micromechanical model is based on an extensive experimental database covering elastic properties and microstructural characteristics of different temperate and tropical hardwood species. Exemplary parameter studies demonstrate the ability of the model to study the contribution of specific microstructural characteristics to the load transfer and the deformation characteristics of wood. 

  • 9.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    et al.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    de Borst, Karin
    University of Glasgow, UK.
    Eberhardsteiner, Josef
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Micromechanical modeling of Common yew and Norway spruce2013In: Proceedings in Applied Mathematics and Mechanics: PAMM, ISSN 1617-7061, E-ISSN 1617-7061, Vol. 13, no 1, 185-186 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this contribution, a micromechanical modeling approach in the framework of poromechanics is adopted to study structure-stiffness relations of two quite different species, namely spruce and yew, in detail. In particular, microstructural specialties of yew and spruce are assessed. A dominant influence of the cellulose content and its orientation on the stiffness of the cell wall is revealed, while on the macroscopic scale, density is found to be the governing microstructural characteristic for elastic properties.

  • 10.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    et al.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    de Borst, Karin
    University of Glasgow, UK.
    Eberhardsteiner, Josef
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Micromechanical Modeling of Wood: Multiscale Modeling and Model Validation2013Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Due to its natural origin and its inherent heterogeneities, mechanical properties of wood are highlyanisotropic and show a broad variability, not only between different wood species, but also within a tree [1].Similar to other biological materials, the wood microstructure is well organized and hierarchically structuredfrom the annual rings visible to the naked eye down to the wood polymers cellulose, hemicellulose, andlignin at the nanometer-scale. The aim of the research conducted at the Institute for Mechanics of Materialsand Structures is a deeper understanding of the role of different hierarchical levels and their correspondingphysical and chemical characteristics in relation to mechanical properties of softwood and hardwood. This isachieved by means of micromechanical modeling and experimental analyses at various length scales.

    A micromechanical model provides the opportunity to predict poroelastic properties of softwood andhardwood tissues at different hierarchical levels from microstructural and compositional data [1,2]. Thehierarchical organization of wood is mathematically represented in a multiscale model. Effective poroelasticproperties are predicted by means of continuum micromechanical approaches (self-consistent method andMori-Tanaka method), the unit cell method, and laminate theory. These approaches are extended to accountfor water-induced eigenstresses within representative volume elements and repetitive unit cells, which aresubsequently upscaled to the macroscopic wood level.

    Verification of the micromechanical model for softwood and hardwood with a comprehensive experimentaldataset, shows that it suitably predicts elastic properties at different length scales under the assumption ofundrained conditions [3,4]. Moreover, Biot tensors, expressing how much of the cell wall water-induced porepressure is transferred to the boundary of an overall deformation-free representative volume element (RVE),and Biot moduli, expressing the porosity changes invoked by a pore pressure within such an RVE can bestudied at different length scales. Consequently, the relevance and the contribution of specificmicrostructural characteristics to the load transfer and the deformation characteristics in case of moisturechanges in wood can be studied. Besides the scientific interest in structure-function-relationships, theseinvestigations are motivated by the growing importance of wood as building material.

  • 11.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    et al.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Eberhardsteiner, Josef
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    de Borst, Karin
    University of Glasgow, UK.
    Shear stiffness and its relation to the microstructure of 10 European and tropical hardwood species2017In: Wood Material Science & Engineering, ISSN 1748-0272, E-ISSN 1748-0280, Vol. 12, no 2, 82-91 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this study, shear stiffness properties of 10 different hardwood species and their relation to the corresponding species-specific microstructure are investigated. For this purpose, shear stiffness of 10 different hardwood species is experimentally measured by means of ultrasonic testing. In addition, a micromechanical model for hardwood is applied in order to illustrate the influence of certain microstructural characteristics such as mass density and volume fractions of vessels and ray cells on the shear stiffness. Comprehensive microstructural and mechanical data from previous investigations of the same hardwood material support the interpretation of the microstructure–shear stiffness relationships. Mass density was confirmed to be the dominant microstructural characteristic for shear stiffness. Also, ultrasound shear wave propagation velocity increases with density, particularly in the radial-tangential (RT) plane. In addition to density, comparably higher shear stiffness GLR can be explained by comparably higher ray content and lower vessel content. As for GLT, a ring porous structure seems to lead to higher shear stiffness as compared to a diffuse porous structure. For this shear stiffness, vessel and ray content were found to have a less impact. Also, the rolling shear stiffness GRT was found to be higher for a diffuse porous structure than for a ring porous one. Moreover, the data supports that ray cells act as reinforcements in the RT plane and lead to higher GRT

  • 12. Bader, Thomas K.
    et al.
    Hofstetter, Karin
    Technische Universität, Austria.
    Pilzabbau von Holz: Quantifizierung des Steifigkeitsverlusts auf Basis von mikromechanischen Überlegungen2010In: Wiener Holzschutztage 2010: 25. - 26. November 2010, Wien, Wien: Wiener Holzschutztage , 2010, Vol. 28, 50-55 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [de]

    Pilzbefall bewirkt eine Zersetzung des Materials durch Mikroorganismen und damit unweigerlich auch eine Veränderung des mechanischen Verhaltens von Holz. Die Auswirkung der mikrostrukturellen Änderungen auf makroskopisch beobachtbare mechanische Materialkennwerte wie Steifigkeit und Festigkeit lassen sich mittels Mehrskalenmodellierung abschätzen und quantifizieren. Die Eignung solcher Mehrskalenmodelle als Prognosewerkzeuge für Dauerhaftigkeitsbetrachtungen wurde im WoodWisdom-Netzwerk „WoodExter“ im Rahmen eines umfangreichen Testprogramms untersucht. Es wurde dabei sowohl ein Braunfäule verursachender Pilz (Gloephyllum trabeum) als auch ein Weißfäule verursachender Pilz (Trametes versicolor) verwendet. Die Vorgehensweise sowie die gewonnenen Einblicke und Erkenntnisse sind in diesem Beitrag zusammengefasst. Nach einer Kurzbeschreibung der hierarchischen Struktur von Holz und deren Modifikation durch Pilze folgt ein Abriss über die verwendeten Verfahren der Mehrskalenmodellierung. Der Schwerpunkt liegt in der Präsentation der Ergebnisse sowie der experimentellen Validierung des Modells durch Vergleich von Messwerten mit zugehörigen Modellvorhersagen. Schließlich werden im Ausblick mögliche Anwendungen der Modellierung skizziert. 

  • 13.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    et al.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Hofstetter, Karin
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Alfredsen, Gry
    Norwegian Forest and Landscape Institute, Norway.
    Bollmus, Susanne
    Georg-August-University of Göttingen, Germany.
    Changes in microstructure and stiffness of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L) sapwood degraded by Gloeophyllum trabeum and Trametes versicolor Part II: Anisotropic stiffness properties2012In: Holzforschung, ISSN 0018-3830, E-ISSN 1437-434X, Vol. 66, no 2, 199-206 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fungal decay considerably affects the macroscopic mechanical properties of wood as a result of modifications and degradations in its microscopic structure. While effects on mechanical properties related to the stem direction are fairly well understood, effects on radial and tangential directions (transverse properties) are less well investigated. In the present study, changes of longitudinal elastic moduli and stiffness data in all anatomical directions of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) sapwood which was degraded by Gloeophyllum trabeum (brown rot) and Trametes versicolor (white rot) for up to 28 weeks have been investigated. Transverse properties were found to be much more deteriorated than the longitudinal ones. This is because of the degradation of the polymer matrix between the cellulose microfibrils, which has a strong effect on transverse stiffness. Longitudinal stiffness, on the other hand, is mainly governed by cellulose microfibrils, which are more stable agains fungal decay. G. trabeum (more active in earlywood) strongly weakens radial stiffness, whereas T. versicolor (more active in latewood) strongly reduces tangential stiffness. The data in terms of radial and tangential stiffnesses, as well as the corresponding anisotropy ratios, seem to be suitable as durability indicators of wood and even allow conclusions to be made on the degradation mechanisms of fungi.

  • 14.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    et al.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Hofstetter, Karin
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Alfredsen, Gry
    Norwegian Forest and Landscape Institute, Norway.
    Bollmus, Susanne
    Georg-August-University of Göttingen, Germany.
    Microstructure and stiffness of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L) sapwood degraded by Gloeophyllum trabeum and Trametes versicolor Part I: Changes in chemical composition, density and equilibrium moisture content2012In: Holzforschung, ISSN 0018-3830, E-ISSN 1437-434X, Vol. 66, no 2, 191-198 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fungal degradation alters the microstructure of wood and its physical and chemical properties are also changed. While these changes are well investigated as a function of mass loss, mass density loss and changes in equilibrium moisture content are not well elucidated. The physical and chemical alterations are crucial when linking microstructural characteristics with macroscopic mechanical properties. In the present article, a consistent set of physical, chemical and mechanical characteristics is presented, which were measured on the same sample before and after fungal degradation. In the first part of this two-part contribution, elucidating microstructure/stiffness-relationships of degraded wood, changes in physical and chemical data are presented, which were collected from specimens of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris) sapwood degraded by Gloeophyllum trabeum (brown rot) and Trametes versicolor (white rot) for up to 28 weeks degradation time. A comparison of mass loss with corresponding mass density loss demonstrated that mass loss entails two effects: firstly, a decrease in sample size (more pronounced for G. trabeum), and secondly, a decrease of mass density within the sample (more pronounced for T. versicolor). These two concurrent effects are interrelated with sample size and shape. Hemicelluloses and cellulose are degraded by G. trabeum, while T. versicolor was additionally able to degrade lignin. In particular because of the breakdown of hemicelluloses and paracrystalline parts of cellulose, the equilibrium moisture content of degraded samples is lower than that in the initial state.

  • 15.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    et al.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Hofstetter, Karin
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Eberhardsteiner, Josef
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Keunecke, Daniel
    ETH Zürich, Switzerland.
    Microstructure–Stiffness Relationships of Common Yew and Norway Spruce2012In: Strain, ISSN 0039-2103, E-ISSN 1475-1305, Vol. 48, no 4, 306-316 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Yew (Taxus baccata L.) exhibits among conifers a unique macroscopic elastic behaviour. For example, it shows a comparatively low longitudinal elastic modulus related to its comparatively high density. We herein explore the microstructural origin of these peculiarities, aiming at the derivation of microstructure–stiffness relationships. We measure stiffness properties of yew at different hierarchical levels and compare them to corresponding stiffnesses of Norway spruce (Picea abies [L.] Karsten). Cell wall stiffness is investigated experimentally by means of nanoindentation in combination with microscopy and thermogravimetric analysis. On the macroscopic level, we perform uniaxial tension and ultrasonic tests. Having at hand, together with previously reported stiffnesses, a consistent data set of mechanical, chemical and physical properties across hierarchical levels of wood, we discuss influences of microstructural characteristics at different scales of observation. Moreover, a micromechanical model is applied to predict trends of effects of the microstructure on the investigated stiffness properties. On the cell wall level, particularly, the amount of cellulose and its orientation – which was earlier reported to be distinctly different for yew and spruce – result in differences between the two considered species. On the macroscopic scale, model predicted effects of the annual ring structure on transverse stiffness and shear stiffness are found to be smaller than effects of the microfibril angle and mass density.

  • 16.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    et al.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Hofstetter, Karin
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Hellmich, Christian
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Eberhardsteiner, Josef
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    From lignin to spruce: Poromechanical upscaling of wood strength2011In: 2010 MRS Fall Meeting: Symposium V/NN/OO/PP – Soft Matter, Biological Materials and Biomedical Materials—Synthesis, Characterization and Applications / [ed] A.J. Nolte, K. Shiba, R. Narayan, D. Nolte, Warrendale, Pennsylvania, USA: Materials Research Society, 2011, Vol. 1301, 75-80 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Wood strength is highly anisotropic, due to the inherent structural hierarchy of the material. In the framework of a combined random-periodic multiscale poro-micromechanics model, we here translate compositional information throughout this hierarchy into the resulting anisotropic strength at the softwood level, based on “universal” elastic properties of cellulose, hemicelluloses, and lignin, and on the shear strength of the latter elementary constituent. Therefore, derivation of the elastic energy in a piece (representative volume element – RVE) of softwood, stemming from homogeneous macroscopic strains prescribed in terms of displacements at the boundary of the RVE and from pressure exerted by water filling the nanoporous space between the hemicelluloses-lignin network within the cell walls, with respect to the shear stiffness of lignin, yields higher order strains in the lignin phase, approximating micro-stress peaks leading to local lignin failure. Relating this (quasi-brittle) failure to overall softwood failure (or strictly speaking, elastic limit of softwood) results in a macroscopic microstructure-dependent failure criterion for softwood. The latter satisfactorily predicts the biaxial strength of spruce at various loading angles with respect to the grain direction. The model also predicts the experimentally well-established fact that uniaxial tensile and compressive strengths, as well as the shear strength of wood, depend quasi-linearly on the cell water content, but highly nonlinearly on the lumen porosity. 

  • 17.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    et al.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Hofstetter, Karin
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Hellmich, Christian
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Eberhardsteiner, Josef
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Homogenization and Localization in a Multiscale Microporomechanical Model for Wood Strength2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 18.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    et al.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Hofstetter, Karin
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Hellmich, Christian
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Eberhardsteiner, Josef
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Multiscale Microporomechanics Model for Estimation of Elastic Limit States of Softwood Materials2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    et al.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Hofstetter, Karin
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Hellmich, Christian
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Eberhardsteiner, Josef
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Multiscale Microporomechanics of Softwood: Applications and Experimental Model Validation2010In: IV European Conference on Computational Mechanics (ECCM 2010), Paris, France: European Community on Computional Methods in Applied Sciences (ECCOMAS), 2010Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    et al.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Hofstetter, Karin
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Hellmich, Christian
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Eberhardsteiner, Josef
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    On the Relevance of Lignin Failure for Softwood Strength: a Poromicromechanical Approach2011In: XI International Conference on Computational Plasticity - Fundamentals and Applications, Barcelona: International Center for Numerical Methods in Engineering (CIMNE), 2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    et al.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Hofstetter, Karin
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Hellmich, Christian
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Eberhardsteiner, Josef
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Poromechanical scale transitions of failure stresses in wood: from the lignin to the spruce level2010In: Zeitschrift für angewandte Mathematik und Mechanik, ISSN 0044-2267, E-ISSN 1521-4001, Vol. 90, no 10-11, 750-767 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wood strength is highly anisotropic, due to the inherent structural hierarchy of the material. In the framework of a combined random-periodic multiscale poro-micromechanics model, we here translate compositional information throughout this hierarchy into the resulting anisotropic strength at the softwood level, based on “universal” elastic properties of cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, and on the shear strength of the latter elementary constituent. Relating, through elastic energy-derived higher-order strains in a poromechanical representative volume element, the (quasi-)brittle failure of lignin to overall softwood failure, results in a macroscopic microstructure-dependent failure criterion for softwood. The latter satisfactorily predicts the biaxial strength of spruce at various loading angles with respect to the grain direction. The model also predicts the experimentally well-established fact that uniaxial tensile and compressive strengths, as well as the shear strength of softwood, depend quasi-linearly on the cell water content, but highly nonlinearly on the lumen porosity.

  • 22.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    et al.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Hofstetter, Karin
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Hellmich, Christian
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Eberhardsteiner, Josef
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    The poroelastic role of water in cell walls of the hierarchical composite “softwood”2010In: Acta Mechanica, ISSN 0001-5970, E-ISSN 1619-6937, Vol. 217, no 1, 75-100 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wood is an anisotropic, hierarchically organized material, and the question how the hierarchical organization governs the anisotropy of its mechanical properties (such as stiffness and strength) has kept researchers busy for decades. While the honeycomb structure of softwood or the chemical composition of the cell wall has been fairly well established, the mechanical role of the cell wall water is less understood. The question arises how its capability to carry compressive loads (but not tensile loads) and its pressurization state affect mechanical deformations of the hierarchical composite “wood”. By extending the framework of poro-micromechanics to more than two material phases, we here provide corresponding answers from a novel hierarchical set of matrix-inclusion problems with eigenstresses: (i) Biot tensors, expressing how much of the cell wall water-induced pore pressure is transferred to the boundary of an overall deformation-free representative volume element (RVE), and (ii) Biot moduli, expressing the porosity changes invoked by a pore pressure within such an RVE, are reported as functions of the material’s composition, in particular of its water content and its lumen space. At the level of softwood, where we transform a periodic homogenization scheme into an equivalent matrix-inclusion problem, all Biot tensor components are found to increase with decreasing lumen volume fraction. A further research finding concerns the strong anisotropy of the Biot tensor with respect to the water content: Transverse components increase with increasing water content, while the relationship “longitudinal Biot tensor component versus volume fraction of water within the wood cell wall” exhibits a maximum, representing a trade-off between pore pressure increase (increasing the longitudinal Biot tensor component, dominantly at low water content) and softening of the cell wall (reducing this component, dominantly at high water contents). Soft cell wall matrices reinforced with very stiff cellulose fibers may even result in negative longitudinal Biot tensor components. The aforementioned maximum effect is also noted for the Biot modulus.

  • 23.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    et al.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Wikete, Christoph
    de Borst, Karin
    Elastic Properties of Hardwood at Different Length Scales Predicted by Means of a Micromechanical Model2012In: Proceedings of the 6th European Congress on Computational Methods in Applied Sciences and Engineering (ECCOMAS 2012), Vienna University of Technology, Vienna, Austria, Vienna, Austria, 2012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    et al.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Wikete, Christoph
    Jäger, Andreas
    Hofstetter, Karin
    Eberhardsteiner, Josef
    Mechanical Properties and Microstructural Characteristics of Hardwood2010In: COST Action FP 0802 Workshop: Wood Structure/Function-Relationships, 5-8 October, 2010, Hamburg, Germany, Hamburg, Germany, 2010, 61- p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Bagaoisan, Guts Nacino
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Kalmar Maritime Academy.
    Johansson, Emil
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Kalmar Maritime Academy.
    Plats för plast; ger det mer last?: En fallstudie om byte från stålrör till glasfiberförstärkt plaströr (GRE) ombord på M/T Ekfjord2016Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This diploma thesis examines whether a change of cargo and ballast piping from steel to glass reinforced epoxy pipes (GRE-­pipes) on the tanker M/T Ekfjord could result in a measurable weight reduction and therefore a lighter displacement. This thesis also examined if this weight loss may contribute to a lower fuel consumption.

    Data regarding the regulations of steel and plastic piping onboard ships was studied; both the classification society’s (DNV GL) and IMO’s rules and recommendations.

    Future Pipe Industries and Favuseal AS, suppliers of GRE-­pipes and PFP (passive fire protection) for fiberglass piping systems were contacted. They provided the information regarding weight and dimensions for GRE-­pipes and which of their products complies with IMO’s and DNV GL’s regulations.

    Using the original drawings and pipe list from M/T Ekfjord, dimensions and weight calculations were performed for cargo and ballast pipes. With calculations done for both the original and the GRE-­pipes, we were able to identify the weight being saved.

    This thesis concludes that the change from steel to GRE piping system results in a weight reduction of 33.79 metric tons. This weight reduction has no major impact on the overall fuel consumption, however the weight saved can be replaced with cargo if space is available in the cargo tanks.

  • 26.
    de Borst, Karin
    et al.
    University of Glasgow, UK.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Structure-€“function relationships in hardwood: Insight from micromechanical modelling2014In: Journal of Theoretical Biology, ISSN 0022-5193, E-ISSN 1095-8541, Vol. 345, 78-91 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract A micromechanical model is presented that predicts the stiffness of wood tissues in their three principal anatomical directions, across various hardwood species. The wood polymers cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin, common to all wood tissues, serve as the starting point. In seven homogenisation steps, the stiffnesses of these polymers are linked to the macroscopic stiffness. The good agreement of model predictions and corresponding experimental data for ten different European and tropical species confirms the functionality and accuracy of the model. The model enables investigating the influence of individual microstructural features on the overall stiffness. This is exploited to elucidate the mechanical effects of vessels and ray cells. Vessels are shown to reduce the stiffness of wood at constant overall density. This supports that a trade-off exists between the hydraulic efficiency and the mechanical support in relation to the anatomical design of wood. Ray cells are shown to act as reinforcing elements in the radial direction.

  • 27.
    de Borst, Karin
    et al.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Wikete, Christoph
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Microstructure-€“stiffness relationships of ten European and tropical hardwood species2012In: Journal of Structural Biology, ISSN 1047-8477, E-ISSN 1095-8657, Vol. 177, no 2, 532-542 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hardwood species exhibit a huge anatomical variability. This makes them perfect study objects for exploring relations between structural features at different length scales and corresponding stiffness properties of wood. We carry out microscopic analysis, nanoindentation tests, as well as macroscale ultrasonic and quasi-static tension tests and build a complete set of microstructural and corresponding micromechanical data of ten different (European and tropical) hardwood species. In addition, we apply micromechanical modeling to further elucidate the individual influences of particular structural features, which might appear only in a superimposed manner in experiments. The test results confirm the dominant influences of the microfibril angle on the stiffness at cell wall level and of density at the macroscopic scale. Vessels and ray cells affect the macroscopic stiffness of the wood tissue not only through their content, but also through their arrangement and shape: A ring-porous structure results in comparably higher longitudinal but lower radial stiffness than a diffuse-porous one. As for ray cells, large and particularly compactly shaped bundles might reduce the stiffness in tangential direction because of the fiber deviations they cause. Moreover, vessel and ray content might affect the relation between nanoindentation modulus and density-corrected macroscopic longitudinal stiffness.

  • 28.
    Dorn, Michael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building Technology.
    A combined material model for plasticity and fracture for wood2015In: Proceedings of the EUROMECH Colloquium 556 on Theoretical, Numerical, and Experimental Analyses in Wood Mechanics / [ed] Michael Kaliske, 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Dorn, Michael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building Technology.
    Proposal for a Failure Surface for Orthotropic Composite Materials2014In: / [ed] Oñate, Eugenio and Oliver, Xavier and Huerta, Antonio, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Eitelberger, Johannes
    et al.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    de Borst, Karin
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Jäger, Andreas
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Multiscale prediction of viscoelastic properties of softwood under constant climatic conditions2012In: Computational materials science, ISSN 0927-0256, E-ISSN 1879-0801, Vol. 55, 303-312 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper covers the development and validation of a multiscale homogenization model for linear viscoelastic properties of wood. Starting point is the intrinsic structural hierarchy of wood, which is accounted for by several homogenization steps. Using the correspondence principle, an existing homogenization model for the prediction of elastic properties of wood is adapted herein for upscaling of viscoelastic characteristics. Accordingly, self-consistent, Mori–Tanaka, and unit-cell-based techniques are employed, leading to pointwise defined tensorial creep and relaxation functions in the Laplace-Carson domain. Subsequently, these functions are back-transformed into the time domain by means of the Gaver-Stehfest algorithm. With this procedure the orthotropic macroscopic creep behavior of wood can be derived from the isotropic shear behavior of the lignin-hemicellulose phase. A comparison of model predictions for viscoelastic properties of softwood with corresponding experimentally derived values yields very promising results and confirms the suitability of the model.

  • 31. Eriksson, Jerry
    et al.
    Ludvigsson, Mikael
    Dorn, Michael
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building and Energy Technology.
    Serrano, Erik
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building and Energy Technology.
    Enquist, Bertil
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building and Energy Technology.
    Load bearing timber glass composites: A WoodWisdom-Netproject for innovative building system2013In: COST Action TU0905 Mid-term Conference on Structural Glass / [ed] Jan Belis; Christian Louter; Danijel Mocibob, Boca Raton, Fla: CRC Press, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this three year project, which is part of the WoodWisdom-Net researchprogram, is to develop an innovative load bearing building system composed of timberglasscomposites. The structural loads applied onto these composites will be transferred to, andsupported by, the glass component, in contrary to today’s traditional solutions where glass elementsonly function as an environmental shield. Using such structural elements will make itpossible to largely increase the glass surface in buildings, allowing the presence of more naturallight in personal homes and office buildings.

    Timber-glass shear walls and beams will be developed taking into consideration long-term behaviorand seismic performance. Design concepts, feasibility studies and performance assessmentsof these components will be performed in order to improve the overall performance. Theproject also includes the development of new design calculations as well as the optimization ofmanufacturing methods.

    Material properties of timber, glass and adhesives will be determined from small and large scaleexperimental investigations, and will be used as input for theoretical calculations and modelingwork. The projects industrial partners will function as expertise and take part in the developmentand construction of demonstration objects.

    The project consortium is composed of academic and industrial partners from Austria, Sweden,Germany, Turkey, Slovenia, Chile, and Brazil. This paper presents material specifications andresults from small scale testing performed by the Swedish project partners.

  • 32.
    Fallqvist, B.
    et al.
    Royal Institute of Technology, (KTH).
    Kroon, Martin
    Royal Institute of Technology, (KTH).
    Constitutive modelling of composite biopolymer networks2016In: Journal of Theoretical Biology, ISSN 0022-5193, E-ISSN 1095-8541, Vol. 395, 51-61 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The mechanical behaviour of biopolymer networks is to a large extent determined at a microstructural level where the characteristics of individual filaments and the interactions between them determine the response at a macroscopic level. Phenomena such as viscoelasticity and strain-hardening followed by strain-softening are observed experimentally in these networks, often due to microstructural changes (such as filament sliding, rupture and cross-link debonding). Further, composite structures can also be formed with vastly different mechanical properties as compared to the individual networks. In this present paper, we present a constitutive model presented in a continuum framework aimed at capturing these effects. Special care is taken to formulate thermodynamically consistent evolution laws for dissipative effects. This model, incorporating possible anisotropic network properties, is based on a strain energy function, split into an isochoric and a volumetric part. Generalisation to three dimensions is performed by numerical integration over the unit sphere. Model predictions indicate that the constitutive model is well able to predict the elastic and viscoelastic response of biological networks, and to an extent also composite structures.

  • 33.
    Füssl, Josef
    et al.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Eberhardsteiner, Josef
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Computational Mechanics for Advanced Timber Engineering: from material modeling to structural applications2012In: IACM Expressions, no 32, 6-11 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 34.
    Gamstedt, E. Kristofer
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    de Borst, Karin
    University of Glasgow, UK.
    Mixed numerical–experimental methods in wood micromechanics2012In: Wood Science and Technology, ISSN 0043-7719, E-ISSN 1432-5225, Vol. 47, no 1, 183-202 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mixed numerical–experimental methods are increasingly used in various disciplines in materials science, recently also in wood micromechanics. Having a relatively irregular microstructure, direct interpretation of mechanical tests is not always possible since structurally specific properties are quantified rather than general material properties. The advent of combined numerical–experimental methods unlocks possibilities for a more accurate experimental characterization. A number of examples of mixed methods pertaining to both emerging experimental techniques and physical phenomena are presented: nano-indentation, moisture transport, digital-image correlation, dimensional instability and fracture of wood-based materials. Successful examples from other classes of materials are also presented, in an attempt to provide some ideas potentially useful in wood mechanics. Some general pit-falls in parameter estimation from experimental results are also outlined.

  • 35.
    Gamstedt, Kristofer
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    de Borst, Karin
    University of Glasgow, UK.
    Mixed Numerical-Experimental Methods in Wood Micromechanics2012In: COST Action FP 0802: Experimental and computional micro-characterization techniques in wood mechanics, Edinburgh, UK, 2012, 86-87 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 36.
    Gloimüller, Stefan
    et al.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    de Borst, Karin
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Eberhardsteiner, Josef
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Determination of the linear elastic stiffness and hygroexpansion of softwood by a multilayered unit cell using poromechanics2012In: Interaction and Multiscale Mechanics, An International Journal, ISSN 1976-0426, Vol. 5, no 3, 229-265 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hygroexpansion of wood is a known and undesired characteristic in civil engineering. When wood is exposed to changing environmental humidity, it adsorbs or desorbs moisture and warps. The resulting distortions or - at restrained conditions - cracks are a major concern in timber engineering. We herein present a multiscale model for prediction of the macroscopic hygroexpansion behavior of individual pieces of softwood from their microstructure, demonstrated for spruce. By applying poromicromechanics, we establish a link between the swelling pressure, driving the hygroexpansion of wood at the nanoscale, and the resulting macroscopic dimensional changes. The model comprises six homogenization steps, which are performed by means of continuum micromechanics, the unit cell method and laminate theory, all formulated in a poromechanical framework. Model predictions for elastic properties of wood as functions of the moisture content closely approach corresponding experimental data. As for the hygroexpansion behavior, the swelling pressure has to be back-calculated from macroscopic hygroexpansion data. The good reproduction of the anisotropy of wood hygroexpansion, based on only a single scalar calibration parameter, underlines the suitability of the model. The multiscale model constitutes a valuable tool for studying the effect of microstructural features on the macroscopic behavior and for assessing the hygroexpansion behavior at smaller length scales, which are inaccessible to experiments. The model predictions deliver input parameters for the analysis of timber at the structural scale, therewith enabling to optimize the use of timber and to prevent moisture-induced damage or failure.

  • 37.
    Godinho, Pedro M.J.S.
    et al.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Jajcinovic, Marina
    Graz University of Technology, Austria.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building Technology.
    Fischer, Wolfgang. J.
    Graz University of Technology, Austria.
    Bauer, Wolfgang
    Graz University of Technology, Austria.
    Hellmich, Christian
    Vienna University of Technology.
    A continuum micromechanics approach to the strength of planar fiber networks: paper material applications2017In: CompWood 2017 - Computational Methods in Wood Mechanics - From Material Properties to Timber Structures: Programme & Book  of Abstract / [ed] Josef Füssl, Thomas K. Bader, Josef Eberhardsteiner, Vienna: TU verlag , 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 38. Godinho, Pedro M.S.J.
    et al.
    Jajcinovic, Marina
    Bader, Thomas K.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Building Technology.
    Fischer, Wolfgang J.
    Hirn, Ulrich
    Bauer, Wolfgang
    Hellmich, Christian
    A continuum micromechanics approach to the strength of planar fiber networks: paper material applications2017In: Vienna Young Scientists Symposium, June 1-2, 2017, Vienna, Austria, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Hellmich, Christian
    et al.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Hofstetter, Karin
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Eberhardsteiner, Josef
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Role of Water in Cell Walls of the Hierarchical Composite "Softwood": A Poroelastic Analysis2011In: Engineering Mechanics Institute 2011 Conference (EMI 2011), Bonston, 2011, 195- p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 40.
    Hofstetter, Karin
    et al.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Eitelberger, Johannes
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Hellmich, Christian
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Eberhardsteiner, Josef
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Computational Multiscale Approach to the Mechanical Behavior and Transport Behavior of Wood2009In: Computational Structural Engineering: Proceedings of the International Symposium on Computational Structural Engineering, held in Shanghai, China, June 22–24, 2009, Springer, 2009, 79-85 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Moisture considerably affects the macroscopic material behavior of wood. Since moisture takes effect on wood at various length scales, a computational multiscale approach is presented in this paper in order to explain and mathematically describe the macroscopic mechanical and transport behavior of wood. Such an approach allows for appropriate consideration of the underlying physical phenomena and for the suitable representation of the influence of microstructural characteristics of individual wood tissues on the macroscopic behavior. Continuum (poro-)micromechanics is applied as homogenization technique in order to link properties at different length scales. Building the model on universal constituents with tissue-independent properties and on universal building patterns, the only tissue-dependent input parameters are wood species, mass density, moisture content, and temperature. All these parameters are easily accessible, what renders the models powerful and easily applicable tools for practical timber engineering.

  • 41.
    Hofstetter, Karin
    et al.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Hellmich, Christian
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Eberhardsteiner, Josef
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Poro-micromechanical Estimates for Elastic Limit States of Wood2008In: Eleventh East Asia-Pacific Conference on Structural Engineering and Construction, Taipei, Taiwan, 2008, 550-551 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 42. Hofstetter, Karin
    et al.
    Hellmich, Christian
    Bader, Thomas K.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Eberhardsteiner, Josef
    Relevance of Microstructural Failure Mechanismus for Macroscopic Elastic Limit States of Wood2008Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 43. Jäger, Andreas
    et al.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Hofstetter, Karin
    Eberhardsteiner, Josef
    Identification of Elastic Properties of Wood Cell Walls by Means of Nanoindentation2009In: 26th Danubia-Adria Symposium on Advances in Experimental Mechanics, Leoben, Austria, 2009, 83-84 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Jäger, Andreas
    et al.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Hofstetter, Karin
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Eberhardsteiner, Josef
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    The relation between indentation modulus, microfibril angle, and elastic properties of wood cell walls2011In: Composites. Part A, Applied science and manufacturing, ISSN 1359-835X, E-ISSN 1878-5840, Vol. 42, no 6, 677-685 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanoindentation is a well known tool for identification of mechanical properties at the micrometer scale of materials. When applied to study wood cell walls the commonly used isotropic indentation theory is not applicable. In this study, anisotropic nanoindentation theory was employed for analyzing nanoindentation test results on wood cell walls. The influence of elastic stiffness components, microfibril angle, and cell wall composition on the indentation modulus was studied. The indentation modulus was found to depend on longitudinal, transverse, and shear modulus to a similar extent. A significant influence of the microfibril angle on the indentation modulus was observed and discussed with respect to experimental scatter and sample preparation. It is concluded, that application of anisotropic nanoindentation theory provides a tool for quantitative instead of qualitative investigation of wood cell walls, with the goal of identifying all elastic properties of the transversely isotropic cell wall from nanoindentation tests.

  • 45.
    Konnerth, Johannes
    et al.
    BOKU-University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Austria.
    Eiser, Martina
    Competence Center for Wood Composites and Wood Chemistry, Austria.
    Jäger, Andreas
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Hofstetter, Karin
    Follrich, Jürgen
    Competence Center for Wood Composites and Wood Chemistry, Austria.
    Ters, Thomas
    BOKU-University of Natural Resources and Applied Life Sciences, Austria.
    Hansmann, Christian
    Competence Center for Wood Composites and Wood Chemistry, Austria.
    Wimmer, Rupert
    ood Technology and Wood-based Composites Unit, Germany.
    Macro- and micro-mechanical properties of red oak wood (Quercus rubra L.) treated with hemicellulases2010In: Holzforschung, ISSN 0018-3830, E-ISSN 1437-434X, Vol. 64, no 4, 447-453 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Red oak wood (Quercus rubra L.) samples were submitted to an enzymatic treatment with a commercial mixture of hemicellulases aiming at the selective depolymerization and removal of the hemicelluloses. Mechanical properties of treated samples were characterized and compared with untreated samples at two hierarchical levels. At the macrolevel, tensile properties revealed to be less sensitive to degradation of the cell wall matrix compared to compression and hardness properties. Results obtained through indentation at the microlevel indicated that hardness and the so-called reduced modulus of treated wood were significantly lowered. Accordingly, hardness and reduced elastic modulus have proven to be most sensitive to modification of the cell wall matrix by reducing the content of hemicelluloses. It is proposed that transversal and shear stresses, which are mainly carried by the cell wall matrix, are additional parameters having strong effects on elastic modulus obtained by nanoindentation. Micromechanical modeling was employed to confirm the observed changes. There is consistency between the measured and the modeled properties, obtained at both the microlevel and the macrolevel of wood.

  • 46. Voulgaridis, E
    et al.
    Passialis, C
    Adamopoulos, S
    Foti, D
    Voulgaridou, E
    Production and properties of experimental bricks for interior walls from gypsum and recycled materials of wood and rubber2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Τhe manufacturing and testing of gypsum bonded solid bricks with wood chips from particleboard production residues and rubber and textile fibers from waste tires was investigated. The recovered rubber and wood materials were mixed in gypsum/water solutions for the fabrication of standard solid bricks with six holes by using appropriate molds. After drying, the compressive strength, the thermal conductivity, the air-flow resistance, the sound absorption coefficient and the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) of the bricks were determined. The compressive strength of solid bricks was much greater than that required in interior walls. The bricks showed a better thermal insulation than both the extruded and pressed house bricks but lower than the insulating bricks. Emissions of volatile organic compounds of bricks were at acceptable levels according to regulations for construction products. The sound absorption coefficient of the solid bricks was 0,72 for the frequency of 1 kHz and decreased with increasing frequency. In addition, information on the raw materials and production cost are given

  • 47. Wagner, Leopold
    et al.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Cell Wall Properties of Archaelogical Oak Wood from the Vasa Shipwreck: A Nanoindentation Study2015In: 32nd Danubia-Adria-Symposium (DAS 32), Zilina, Slovakia, 2015, 162-163 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 48.
    Wagner, Leopold
    et al.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Auty, David
    Université Laval, Canada.
    de Borst, Karin
    University of Glasgow, UK.
    Control Parameters for Within-Tree Variability of Wood Stiffness at Different Length Scales: Multiscale Modeling and Experimental Investigations2012In: COST Action FP0802 - Experimental and Computational Micro-Characterization Techniques in Wood Mechanics, Edinburgh, UK, 2012, 72-73 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 49.
    Wagner, Leopold
    et al.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    Auty, David
    University of Aberdeen, UK.
    de Borst, Karin
    University of Glasgow, UK.
    Key parameters controlling stiffness variability within trees: a multiscale experimental–numerical approach2012In: Trees, ISSN 0931-1890, E-ISSN 1432-2285, Vol. 27, no 1, 321-336 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microstructural properties of wood vary considerably within a tree. Knowledge of these properties and a better understanding of their relationship to the macroscopic mechanical performance of wood are crucial to optimize the yield and economic value of forest stocks. This holds particularly for the end-use requirements in engineering applications. In this study the microstructure–stiffness relationships of Scots pine are examined with a focus on the effects of the microstructural variability on the elastic properties of wood at different length scales. For this purpose, we have augmented microstructural data acquired using SilviScan-3™ (namely wood density, cell dimensions, earlywood and latewood proportion, microfibril angle) with local measurements of these quantities and of the chemical composition derived from wide-angle X-ray scattering, light microscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis, respectively. The stiffness properties were determined by means of ultrasonic tests at the clear wood scale and by means of nanoindentation at the cell wall scale. In addition, micro-mechanical modeling was applied to assess the causal relations between structural and mechanical properties and to complement the experimental investigations. Typical variability profiles of microstructural and mechanical properties are shown from pith to bark, across a single growth ring and from earlywood to latewood. The clear increase of the longitudinal stiffness as well as the rather constant transverse stiffness from pith to bark could be explained by the variation in microfibril angle and wood density over the entire radial distance. The dependence of local cell wall stiffness on the local microfibril angle was also demonstrated. However, the local properties did not necessarily follow the trends observed at the macroscopic scale and exhibited only a weak relationship with the macroscopic mechanical properties. While the relationship between silvicultural practice and wood microstructure remains to be modeled using statistical techniques, the influence of microstructural properties on the macroscopic mechanical behavior of wood can now be described by a physical model. The knowledge gained by these investigations and the availability of a new micromechanical model, which allows transferring these findings to non-tested material, will be valuable for wood quality assessment and optimization in timber engineering.

  • 50. Wagner, Leopold
    et al.
    Bader, Thomas K.
    Vienna University of Technology, Austria.
    de Borst, Karin
    Mechanical Properties of Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) Cell Walls After Fungal Degradation: Multiscale Micromechanical Modeling and Experimental Validation2012Conference paper (Other academic)
12 1 - 50 of 63
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf