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  • 1.
    Ali, Sharafat
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Novel thin films in the M-Si-O-N systems2019In: Presented at the Fourth International Conference on Nanomaterials: Synthesis, Characterization and Applications (ICN 2019). 12-14 April 2019, Kerala, India, 2019, p. 7-7Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Ali, Sharafat
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Paul, Biplab
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Roger
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Erik, Ekström
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Pallier, Camille
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Jonson, Bo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Built Environment and Energy Technology.
    Eklund, Per
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Birch, Jens
    Linköping University, Sweden.
    Optical and mechanical properties of amorphous Mg-Si-O-N thin films deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering2019In: Surface & Coatings Technology, ISSN 0257-8972, E-ISSN 1879-3347, Vol. 372, no 25, p. 9-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this work, amorphous thin films in Mg-Si-O-N system typically containing >15 at.% Mg and 35 at.% N were prepared in order to investigate especially the dependence of optical and mechanical properties on Mg composition. Reactive RF magnetron co-sputtering from magnesium and silicon targets were used for the deposition of Mg-Si-O-N thin films. Films were deposited on float glass, silica wafers and sapphire substrates in an Ar, N2 and O2 gas mixture. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and nanoindentation were employed to characterize the composition, surface morphology, and properties of the films. The films consist of N and Mg contents up to 40 at.% and 28 at.%, respectively and have good adhesion to substrates and are chemically inert. The thickness and roughness of the films increased with increasing content of Mg. Both hardness (16–21 GPa) and reduced elastic modulus (120–176 GPa) are strongly correlated with the amount of Mg content. The refractive index up to 2.01 and extinction coefficient up to 0.18 were found to increase with Mg content. The optical band gap (3.1–4.3) decreases with increasing the Mg content. Thin film deposited at substrate temperature of 100 °C shows a lower value of hardness (10 GPa), refractive index (1.75), and higher values of reduced elastic modulus (124 GPa) as compared to the thin film deposited at 310 °C and 510 °C respectively, under identical synthesis parameters.

  • 3.
    Bhatnagar, Amit
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Biology and Environmental Science.
    Sillanpää, Mika
    Lappeenranta University of Technology, Finland.
    Application of Nanoadsorbents in Water Treatment2014In: Nanomaterials for Environmental Protection / [ed] Boris I. Kharisov, Oxana V. Kharissova, & H. V. Rasika Dias, John Wiley & Sons, 2014, 1, p. 237-247Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Water treatment using the adsorption process has been found to be one of the most widely used methods, and several wastewater treatment plants around the world are operating on the principle of adsorption. Numerous adsorbents, for example, activated carbon, silica gel, zeolites, low-cost adsorbents from agro-industrial wastes, biosorbents, mineral-based adsorbents, and layered-double hydroxides, have been examined for their potential in the removal (adsorption) of diverse types of aquatic pollutants. In recent years, nanotechnology has emerged as one of the attractive technologies for water treatment, and various nanoadsorbents have been explored for water treatment applications. This chapter briefly summarizes the progress, advances, and applications of nanoadsorbents for water remediation. A compilation of various nanoadsorbents as reported in the literature has been presented, and their main findings related to water treatment applications are discussed. The chapter concludes with a discussion on the future perspectives in this field.

  • 4.
    Ekstrand, Johan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Forestry and Wood Technology.
    Enhancement of Phenol Formaldehyde Adhesive with Crystalline Nano Cellulose2019Independent thesis Basic level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    The wood industries to this day use almost exclusively petroleum derived adhesives that are based mainly on the reaction of formaldehyde with urea, melamine or phenol. These adhesives have low cost and good adjustable properties which makes it hard for bio-based alternatives to compete. Phenol formaldehyde (PF), as an example of a synthetic adhesive, has been in use for over 100 years. In some parts of the world, legislation around formaldehyde is changing, and there is an increasingly voluntary awareness about the toxicity and unsustainability of formaldehyde. Industries realize that raw materials from oil is unstainable. The latter is currently a driving factor behind research on alternatives to amino based adhesives. Also, consumer interest in healthy and sustainable products, such as emitting less formaldehyde indoors, increases the need for bio based adhesives.

    Cellulose contained in plant cell walls is a renewable, abundant and nontoxic resource. During the last decades, many innovations have been achieved around cellulose and this trend does not seem to be slowing down. Cellulose shows excellent mechanical properties, high strength, high elastic modulus as well as having a low density.

    Research about cellulose reinforced adhesives has been increased the last years. This thesis studied the enhancement of phenol formaldehyde adhesive with Crystalline Nano Cellulose (CNC) at 5wt% and 10wt% loading levels for producing plywood boards. Indecisive results when using CNC higher than 3wt%, especially with PF resin, have been reported by other authors.

    In this thesis, European standards were applied. EN 314 was applied to test the panels shear strength. Three (3) treatment classes were selected, indoor room condition as well as pre-treatments 5.1.1 and 5.1.3. Other properties measured were modulus of elasticity, thickness swelling, formaldehyde emissions.

    Results showed a shear strength increase for all pre-treatment classes. 10wt% CNC mixture with phenol formaldehyde in water bath, pre-treatment (5.1.1) for 24h showed the highest increase in shear strength (+73,9%). The 10 wt% CNC mixture panels also showed the highest wood fibre failure of all panel types produced. A decrease in MOE has been observed with 10 wt% CNC compared to the 5 wt% CNC panels. Formaldehyde emissions tests were inconclusive, but since less PF was used, there was a general reduction in emissions. The 5 wt% CNC panels were superior in terms of modulus of elasticity and swelling and also showed improved shear strength. 

  • 5.
    Lard, Mercy
    et al.
    Lund University.
    ten Siethoff, Lasse
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Kumar, Saroj
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences. Delhi Technological University, India.
    Persson, Malin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    te Kronnie, G.
    University of Padova, Italy.
    Månsson, Alf
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Linke, H.
    Lund University.
    Nano-structuring for molecular motor control2015In: Nano-Structures for Optics and Photonics: Optical Strategies for Enhancing Sensing, Imaging, Communication and Energy Conversion / [ed] Baldassare Di Bartolo, John Collins, Luciano Silvestri, Springer, 2015, p. 459-459Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interaction of self-propelled biological molecular-motors and cytoskeletal filaments holds relevance for a variety of applications such as biosensing, drug screening, diagnostics and biocomputation. The use of these systems for lab-on-a-chip biotechnology applications shows potential for replacement of microfluidic flow by active, molecular-motor driven transport of filaments. The ability to control, confine and detect motile objects in such a system is possible by development of nanostructured surfaces for on-chip applications and fundamental studies of molecular-motors. Here we describe the localized detection (Lard et al., Sci Rep 3:1092, 2013) and fast transport of actin filaments by myosin molecular-motors (Lard et al., Biosens Biolectron 48(0):145–152, 2013), inserted within nanostructures, as a method for biocomputation and molecular concentration. These results include extensive myosin driven concentration of actin filaments on a miniaturized detector, of relevance for use of molecular-motors in a diagnostics platform. Also, we discuss the local enhancement of the fluorescence signal of filaments, relevant for use in a biocomputation device where tracking of potentially thousands of motile objects is of primary significance.

  • 6.
    Rahman, Mohammad A.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Chemistry and Biomedical Sciences.
    Biophysical studies of the actin-myosin motor system and applications in nanoscience2019Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    The actin-myosin motor system plays important roles in cellular processes. In addition, actin and myosin have been used for developments towards nanotechnological applications in recent years. Therefore, fundamental biophysical studies of actin and myosin and the actomyosin force generating cycle are important both in biology and for nanotechnology where the latter applications require methodological insights for optimization. This dual goal is central in the present thesis with major focus on factors that control the function (e.g. velocity) and the effectiveness of transport of filaments (e.g. filament flexural rigidity) through nanoscale channels with supplementation of methodological insights. The thesis thus provides evidence that actin is a dynamic filament whose flexural rigidity is different at different MgATP concentrations as well as in the presence or absence of myosin binding. Furthermore, probing the myosin ATPase cycle with the myosin inhibitor blebbistatin revealed that velocity is easily modified by this drug. Our detailed studies also suggest that actin-myosin force generation is preceded by Pi release and that blebbistatin changes the rate limiting transition in the cycle from the attachment step to a step between weakly attached states. The studies of actin dynamics and of the actomyosin force generating cycle were largely performed using in vitro motility assay (IVMA) where surface adsorbed myosin motor or its proteolytic fragments propel fluorescently labeled actin filaments. The IVMA is often taken as the basis for developments towards different nanotechnological applications. However, in the IVMA, actomyosin motility is often negatively affected by the presence of “dead”, non-functional myosin heads. Therefore, in this thesis, two popular methods, that are often used to remove dead myosin heads, are analyzed and compared. It was found that after affinity purification, the in vitro actin sliding velocity is reduced compared to the control conditions, something that was not seen with the use of blocking actin. Therefore, the effects of the affinity purification method should be considered when interpreting IVMA data. This is important while using IVMA both for fundamental studies and for nanotechnological applications. Another issue in the use of IVMAs in nanotechnological applications is the requirement for expensive and time-consuming fabrication of nanostructured devices. We therefore developed a suitable method for regenerating molecular motor based bionanodevices without a need to disassemble the flow cell. Evidence is presented that, use of proteinase K with a suitable detergent (SDS or Triton X100) lead to successful regeneration of devices where both actin-myosin and microtubule-kinesin motility are used. Lastly, this thesis presents efforts to immobilize engineered light sensitive myosin motors on trimethyl chlorosilane (TMCS) derivatized surfaces for light operated switching of myosin motor in order to control actin movement in nano-networks. This has potential for developing a programmable junction in a biocomputation network. In brief, the described results have contributed both to the fundamental understanding of actin and myosin properties and the actomyosin interaction mechanisms. They have also given technical insights for molecular motor based bionanotechnology.

  • 7.
    Wu, Philip
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Paschoal Jr, Waldomiro
    Lund University.
    Kumar, Sandeep
    Lund University.
    Borschel, Christian
    Jena University.
    Ronning, Carsten
    Jena University.
    Canali, Carlo M.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Computer Science, Physics and Mathematics.
    Samuelson, Lars
    Lund University.
    Pettersson, Håkan
    Halmstad University.
    Linke, Heiner
    Lund University.
    Thermoelectric Characterization of Electronic Properties of GaMnAs Nanowires2012In: Journal of Nanotechnology, ISSN 1687-9503, E-ISSN 1687-9511, p. Article ID: 480813-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanowires with magnetic doping centers are an exciting candidate for the study of spin physics and proof-of-principle spintronics devices. The required heavy doping can be expected to have a significant impact on the nanowires’ electron transport properties.

    Here, we use thermopower and conductance measurements for transport characterization of Ga0.95Mn0.05As nanowires over a broad temperature range. We determine the carrier type (holes) and concentration and find a sharp increase of the thermopower below temperatures of 120 K that can be qualitatively described by a hopping conduction model. However, the unusually large thermopower suggests that additional mechanisms must be considered as well.

1 - 7 of 7
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