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  • 1.
    Kroon, Martin
    Royal Institute of Technology (KTH).
    Modeling of fibroblast-controlled strengthening and remodeling of uniaxially constrained collagen gels2010In: Journal of Biomechanical Engineering, ISSN 0148-0731, E-ISSN 1528-8951, Vol. 132, no 11, article id 111008Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A theoretical model for the remodeling of collagen gels is proposed. The collagen fabric is modeled as a network of collagen fibers, which in turn are composed of collagen fibrils. In the model, the strengthening of collagen fabric is accomplished by fibroblasts, which continuously recruit and attach more collagen fibrils to existing collagen fibers. The fibroblasts also accomplish a reorientation of collagen fibers. Fibroblasts are assumed to reorient collagen fibers toward the direction of maximum material stiffness. The proposed model is applied to experiments in which fibroblasts were inserted into a collagen gel. The model is able to predict the force-strain curves for the experimental collagen gels, and the final distribution of collagen fibers also agrees qualitatively with the experiments.

  • 2.
    Petzold, Martin
    et al.
    University of Cologne, Germany.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Bobeth, Jan
    CURE - Center for Usability Research and Engineering, Austria.
    Kern, Dagmar
    Mayer, Christopher
    AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Austria.
    Morandell, Martin
    AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Austria.
    Towards an Ambient Assisted Living User Interaction Taxonomy2013In: CHI '13 Extended Abstracts of the ACM International Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, New York: ACM Press, 2013, p. 49-54Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Extensive research in the field of ambient assisted living (AAL) provides profound knowledge about the design of AAL systems. However, more generic design characteristics for user interaction have not been formalized for this domain yet. Thus, we propose to develop a domain specific taxonomy for the design of user interaction in AAL systems. We adopted a systematic taxonomy development approach that combines an empirical and a pseudo-conceptual strategy. Six co-researchers from different disciplines conduct the iterative research process. Next to AAL systems existing taxonomies in the field of human-computer interaction are analyzed following the Delphi method. In this paper we present our research process and preliminary results from the first iteration. The final taxonomy allows classification and should support the analysis of user interaction utilized in AAL systems. Furthermore, it can deal as a practical design guideline.

  • 3.
    Rems, Lea
    et al.
    University of Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Ušaj, Marko
    University of Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Kandušer, Maša
    University of Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Reberšek, Matej
    University of Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Miklavčič, Damijan
    University of Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Pucihar, Gorazd
    University of Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Cell electrofusion using nanosecond electric pulses2013In: Scientific Reports, ISSN 2045-2322, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 3, article id 3382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Electrofusion is an efficient method for fusing cells using short-duration high-voltage electric pulses. However, electrofusion yields are very low when fusion partner cells differ considerably in their size, since the extent of electroporation (consequently membrane fusogenic state) with conventionally used microsecond pulses depends proportionally on the cell radius. We here propose a new and innovative approach to fuse cells with shorter, nanosecond (ns) pulses. Using numerical calculations we demonstrate that ns pulses can induce selective electroporation of the contact areas between cells (i.e. the target areas), regardless of the cell size. We then confirm experimentally on B16-F1 and CHO cell lines that electrofusion of cells with either equal or different size by using ns pulses is indeed feasible. Based on our results we expect that ns pulses can improve fusion yields in electrofusion of cells with different size, such as myeloma cells and B lymphocytes in hybridoma technology.

  • 4.
    Ušaj, Marko
    et al.
    University of Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Flisar, Karel
    University of Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Miklavcic, Damijan
    University of Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Kanduser, Masa
    University of Ljubljana, Slovenia.
    Electrofusion of B16-F1 and CHO cells: the comparison of the pulse first and contact first protocols2013In: Bioelectrochemistry, ISSN 1567-5394, E-ISSN 1878-562X, Vol. 89, p. 34-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    High voltage electric pulses induce permeabilisation (i.e. electroporation) of cell membranes. Electric pulses also induce fusion of cells which are in contact. Contacts between cells can be established before electroporation, in so-called contact first or after electroporation in pulse first protocol. The lowest fusion yield was obtained by pulse first protocol (0.8%±0.3%) and it was only detected by phase contrast microscopy. Higher fusion yield detected by fluorescence microscopy was obtained by contact first protocol. The highest fusion yield (15%) was obtained by modified adherence method whereas fusion yield obtained by dielectrophoresis was lower (4%). The results are in agreement with current understanding of electrofusion process and with existing electrochemical models. Our data indicate that probability of stalk formation leading to fusion pores and cytoplasmic mixing is higher in contact first protocol where cells in contact are exposed to electric pulses. Another contribution of present study is the comparison of two detection methods. Although fusion yield can be more precisely determined with fluorescence microscopy we should note that by using this detection method single coloured fused cells cannot be detected. Therefore low fusion yields are more reliably detected by phase contrast microscopy.

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