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  • 1.
    Airey, John
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
    Initiating Collaboration in Higher Education: Disciplinary Literacy and the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning.2011In: Dynamic content and language collaboration in higher education: theory, research, and reflections / [ed] Jacobs, C., Cape Town: Cape Peninsula University of Technology , 2011, 57-65 p.Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Airey, John
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. Uppsala University.
    Lecturing in English: Comparing fluency and content in L1 and L22013In: ICLHE 2013: Integrating Content and Language in Higher Education. University of Maastricht, Netherlands, 11-13 April, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In recent years there has been a noticeable trend in many countries towards teaching university courses in English. However, from a research perspective, difficulties in obtaining comparative data have meant that little is known about what happens when lecturers change teaching language in this way.

    The work presented here follows eighteen lecturers of various disciplines from two Swedish universities who are in the process of changing their teaching language to English. The lecturers were all participants on a teaching in English training course (7.5 ECTS). As part of the course the lecturers gave ten-minute mini-lectures in their first language in a subject area that they usually teach. The following week, the lecturers gave the same lectures again in English.

    The lecture transcripts were analysed in terms of the content presented and comparative fluency. The majority of the lecturers present very similar content in both languages. However, all the lecturers speak more slowly and have shorter runs and more hesitations in their English lectures. There are a number of important differences in the ways in which lecturers dealt with this ‘slowing down’ in English, ranging from making changes to their pedagogical approach to running over time or cutting off the whole end of the lecture.

    In earlier studies lecturers who regularly teach in English suggest they do not notice much difference when teaching in one language or another. However, qualitative analysis of the 18 lecturers’ course reflections (approximately 60 000 words) shows that they were acutely aware of their limitations when teaching in English.

    This analysis provides further insights into the experiences of lecturers who are in the process of changing teaching language and a number of pedagogical recommendations are made.

  • 3.
    Airey, John
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Language and Literature.
    Talking about Teaching in English: Swedish university lecturers' experiences of changing their teaching language2011In: Ibérica, ISSN 1139-7241, Vol. 22, no fall, 35-54 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study documents the experiences of Swedish university lecturers when they change from teaching in their first language to teaching in English. Eighteen lecturers from two Swedish universities took part in a training course for teachers who need to give content courses in English. As part of the course the participants gave mini-lectures in their first language in a subject area that they usually teach. The following week, the lecturers gave the same lectures again, this time in English. The pairs of lectures were videoed and commented on by the lecturers themselves and the whole course cohort in an online discussion forum (an input of approximately 60 000 words). In addition, twelve of the lecturers were interviewed about their experiences of changing language in this way (total of 4 hours of recorded material).

     

    The paper presents a qualitative analysis of the thoughts and experiences expressed by the lecturers in their online discussions and in the interviews concerning the process of changing the language of instruction to English. These results are presented as nine themes. Nine recommendations for teachers changing to teaching in English are also presented. The findings replicate those of earlier studies with one notable exception: the lecturers in this study were acutely aware of their limitations when teaching in English. It is suggested that this may be due to the lecturers’ relative inexperience of English-medium instruction.

     

  • 4.
    Airey, John
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. Uppsala University.
    Berge, Maria
    Umeå University.
    Music and physics don’t mix!: What the humorous misuse of disciplinary-specific semiotic resources can tell us about disciplinary boundaries.2014In: The 5th International 360 Conference. Encompassing the multimodality of knowledge, May 8-10 2014, Aarhus University, Denmark, Aarhus: Aarhus University , 2014, 21- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Becoming part of an academic discipline has been described both in terms of becoming fluent in a disciplinary discourse (Airey 2009; Airey & Linder 2009; Northedge 2002) and achieving disciplinary literacy (Airey 2011, 2013; Geisler 1994). In this paper we investigate disciplinary boundaries by documenting the responses of academics to a semiotic disciplinary hybrid. The hybrid we use is the Physikalisches Lied, a bogus piece of sheet music into which disciplinary-specific semiotic resources from the realm of physics have been incorporated to humorous effect.

    The piece is presented to three distinct disciplinary focus groups: physicists, musicians and a group of academics who have had little contact with either discipline. In order to elicit disciplinary responses that are free from researcher prompts, each focus group is first asked the simple, open-ended question What do you see here? Once discussion of this question is exhausted the focus groups are asked to identify as many puns as they can—essentially all the disciplinary items that they feel have been misappropriated—and to attempt to explain what this means from a disciplinary standpoint. The differences in the responses of the three groups are presented and analysed.

    We argue that the semiotic resources focused on by each of the three groups and the nature of the explanation offered provide evidence of the degree of integration into the disciplines of physics and music. Our findings shed light on the process of becoming a disciplinary insider and the semiotic work involved in this process.

  • 5.
    Airey, John
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Berge, Maria
    Umeå University.
    That's Funny! The humorous effect of misappropriating disciplinary-specific semiotic resources2014In: The first Conference of the International Association for Cognitive Semiotics, Lund, Sweden, 25-27 Sept 2014, 2014, 50-51 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The socialization of disciplinary outsiders into an academic discipline has been described both in terms of becoming fluent in a disciplinary discourse (Airey, 2009; Airey & Linder, 2009; Northedge, 2002) and achieving disciplinary literacy (Airey, 2011, 2013; Geisler, 1994). In this paper we investigate disciplinary boundaries by documenting the responses of academics to a semiotic disciplinary hybrid. The hybrid we use is the Physikalisches Lied, a bogus piece of sheet music into which disciplinary-specific semiotic resources from the realm of physics have been incorporated to humorous effect.

    The piece is presented to three distinct disciplinary focus groups: physicists, musicians and a group of academics who have had little contact with either discipline. In order to elicit disciplinary responses that are free from researcher prompts, each focus group is first asked the simple, open-ended question What do you see here? Once discussion of this question is exhausted the focus groups are asked to identify as many puns as they can—essentially all the disciplinary items that they feel have been misappropriated—and to attempt to explain what this means from a disciplinary standpoint. The differences in the responses of the three groups are presented and analysed.

    We argue that semiotic material focused on by each of the three groups and the nature of the explanation offered, provide evidence of the degree of integration into the disciplines of physics and music. Our findings shed light on the process of becoming a disciplinary insider and the semiotic work involved in this process.

  • 6.
    Airey, John
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Eriksson, Urban
    Uppsala University.
    Fredlund, Tobias
    Uppsala University.
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala University.
    On the Disciplinary Affordances of Semiotic Resources2014In: Book of Abstracts: The First Conference of the International Association for Cognitive Semiotics (IACS-2014), September 25-27, 2014, 2014, 54-55 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the late 70’s Gibson (1979) introduced the concept of affordance. Initially framed around the needs of an organism in its environment, over the years the term has been appropriated and debated at length by a number of researchers in various fields. Most famous, perhaps is the disagreement between Gibson and Norman (1988) about whether affordances are inherent properties of objects or are only present when they are perceived by an organism. More recently, affordance has been drawn on in the educational arena, particularly with respect to multimodality (see Linder (2013) for a recent example). Here, Kress et al. (2001) have claimed that different modes have different specialized affordances. Then, building on this idea, Airey and Linder (2009) suggested that there is a critical constellation of modes that students need to achieve fluency in before they can experience a concept in an appropriate disciplinary manner. Later, Airey (2009) nuanced this claim, shifting the focus from the modes themselves to a critical constellation of semiotic resources, thus acknowledging that different semiotic resources within a mode often have different affordances (e.g. two or more diagrams may form the critical constellation).

    In this theoretical paper the concept of disciplinary affordance (Fredlund et al., 2012) is suggested as a useful analytical tool for use in education. The concept makes a radical break with the views of both Gibson and Norman in that rather than focusing on the discernment of one individual, it refers to the disciplinary community as a whole. Put simply, the disciplinary affordances of a given semiotic resource are determined by those functions that the resource is expected to fulfil by the disciplinary community. Disciplinary affordances have thus been negotiated and developed within the discipline over time. As such, the question of whether these affordances are inherent or discerned becomes moot. Rather, from an educational perspective the issue is whether the meaning that a semiotic resource affords to an individual matches the disciplinary affordance assigned by the community. The power of the term for educational work is that learning can now be framed as coming to discern the disciplinary affordances of semiotic resources.

    In this paper we will briefly discuss the history of the term affordance, define the term disciplinary affordance and illustrate its usefulness in a number of educational settings.

  • 7.
    Airey, John
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Eriksson, Urban
    Uppsala University.
    Fredlund, Tobias
    Uppsala University.
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala University.
    The Concept of Disciplinary Affordance2014In: The 5th International 360 Conference. Encompassing the multimodality of knowledge, May 8-10 2014, Aarhus University, Denmark, 2014, 20- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since its introduction by Gibson (1979) the concept of affordance has been discussed at length by a number of researchers. Most famous, perhaps is the disagreement between Gibson and Norman (1988) about whether affordances are inherent properties of objects or are only present when perceived by an organism. More recently, affordance has been drawn on in the educational arena, particularly with respect to multimodality (see Linder (2013) for a recent example). Here, Kress et al (2001) claim that different modes have different specialized affordances.

    In this theoretical paper the concept of disciplinary affordance (Fredlund et al., 2012) is suggested as a useful analytical educational tool. The concept makes a radical break with the views of both Gibson and Norman in that rather than focusing on the perception of an individual, it focuses on the disciplinary community as a whole. Put simply, the disciplinary affordances of a given semiotic resource are determined by the functions that it is expected to fulfil for the discipline. As such, the question of whether these affordances are inherent or perceived becomes moot. Rather, the issue is what a semiotic resource affords to an individual and whether this matches the disciplinary affordance. The power of the term is that learning can now be framed as coming to perceive the disciplinary affordances of semiotic resources.

    In this paper we will discuss the history of the term affordance, define the term disciplinary affordance and illustrate its usefulness in a number of educational settings.

  • 8.
    Airey, John
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. Uppsala University.
    Larsson, Johanna
    Uppsala University.
    What Knowledge Do Trainee Physics Teachers Need to Learn?: Differences in the Views of Training Staff2014In: International Science Education Conference ISEC 2014, National Institute of Education, Singapore, 25-27 November, 2014, Singapore: Ministry of Education, National Institute of Education , 2014, 62- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the impact of disciplinary differences on teaching and learning has been extensively discussed in the literature (e.g. Becher 1989; Becher and Trowler 2001; Lindblom-Ylännea et al. 2006; Neumann 2001; Neumann and Becher 2002), little research has explored this issue in relation to teacher training. In particular, we know of no work that examines differing views about the knowledge that trainee teachers need to learn across different settings. In this paper we analyse differences in the expressed views of staff involved in the training of prospective physics teachers in three environments: the education department, the physics department and schools. We analyse these differences in terms of two constructs: disciplinary literacy goals (Airey 2011, 2013) and disciplinary knowledge structures (Bernstein 1999).

    In terms of disciplinary literacy we find a stronger emphasis on learning goals for the academy expressed by informants from the physics and education departments. This can be contrasted with the view that the needs of the workplace are paramount expressed by school practitioners.

    Then, using Bernstein’s knowledge structures, we also identify clear differences in views about the nature of knowledge itself with a more hierarchical view of knowledge prevalent in the physics department and the more horizontal view of knowledge prevalent in the education department.

    The study highlights the often-conflicting signals about what constitutes useful knowledge that prospective physics teachers need to negotiate during their training. We tentatively suggest that more attention should be paid to both the theory/practice divide and potential epistemological differences in the training of prospective teachers.

  • 9.
    Airey, John
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. Uppsala University.
    Linder, Anne
    Uppsala University.
    Mayaba, Nokhanyo
    Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, South Africa.
    Webb, Paul
    Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, South Africa.
    Problematising Disciplinary Literacy in a Multilingual Society: The Case of University Physics in South Africa2013In: 21st Annual Conference of the Southern African Association for Research in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education, University of the Western Cape, Bellville, South Africa, 14 - 17 January, 2013, 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over a decade has passed since Northedge (2002) convincingly argued that the role of the university lecturer should be viewed as one of leading students on excursions into the specialist discourse of their field. In his view, disciplinary discourses have come into being in order to create and share disciplinary knowledge that could not otherwise be appropriately construed in everyday discourse. Thus, Northedge’s conclusion is that in order for disciplinary learning to occur, students will need explicit guidance in accessing and using the specialist discourse of their chosen field. Building on this work, Airey (in press) argues that all university lecturers are, at least to some extent, teachers of language—even in monolingual settings. A radical approach to this claim has been suggested by Wickman and Östman (2002) who insist that learning itself be treated as a form of discourse change.

    In an attempt to operationalise Wickman and Östman’s assertion, Airey (2011b) suggests that the goals of any undergraduate degree programme may be framed in terms of the development of disciplinary literacy. Here, disciplinary literacy is defined as the ability to appropriately participate in the communicative practices of a discipline. Further, in his subsequent work, Airey (2011a) claims that all disciplines attempt to meet the needs of three specific sites: the academy, the workplace and society. He argues that the relative emphasis placed on teaching for these three sites will be different from discipline to discipline and will indeed vary within a discipline depending on the setting. In the South African setting two questions arise from this assertion. The first is: For any given discipline, what particular balance between teaching for the academy, the workplace and society is desirable and/or practicable? The second question follows on from the first: Having pragmatically decided on the teaching balance between the academy, workplace and society, what consequences does the decision have for the language(s) that lecturers should be helping their students to interpret and use? In order to address these two questions we conducted an interview-based case study of the disciplinary literacy goals of South African university lecturers in one particular discipline (physics). Thus, our overarching research question is as follows: How do South African physics lecturers problematise the development of disciplinary literacy in their students?

    The data collected forms part of a larger international comparative study of the disciplinary literacy goals of physics lecturers in Sweden and South Africa. A disciplinary literacy discussion matrix (Airey, 2011a) was employed as the starting point for conducting in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 20 physics lecturers from five South African universities. The choice of these five universities was purposeful—their student cohorts encompassing a range of different first languages and cultural backgrounds. The interviews were conducted in English, lasted between 30 and 60 minutes, and were later transcribed verbatim. The transcripts were then analysed qualitatively. This involved “working with data, organizing it, breaking it into manageable units, synthesizing it, searching for patterns, discovering what is important and what is to be learned, and deciding what you will tell others” (Bogdan & Biklen, 1992:145).

    The main finding of this study is that all the lecturers mentioned language as being problematic in some way. However, there were a number of important differences in the ways the lecturers problematise the development of disciplinary literacy both across and within the different university physics departments. These differences can be seen to involve on the one hand, the lecturers’ own self-image in terms of whether they are comfortable with viewing themselves as language teachers/literacy developers, and on the other hand, their recognition of the diverse linguistic and cultural backgrounds of their students. The differences will be illustrated and discussed using transcript excerpts. These findings are in contrast to parallel data collected in Sweden. In that particular (bilingual) setting, language was viewed as unproblematic, and the most striking characteristic was the very similarity of the responses of physics lecturers (Airey, in press). It is thus suggested that the differences in findings between Sweden and South Africa are a product of the latter’s diverse multilingual and multicultural environment. One pedagogical conclusion is that, given the differences in approach we find, inter- and intra faculty discussions about undergraduate disciplinary literacy goals would appear to have the distinct potential for reforming undergraduate physics. Similarly, an administrative conclusion is that a one-size-fits-all language policy for universities does not appear to be meaningful in such a diverse multilingual/multicultural environment.

    Finally, it should be mentioned that our choice of physics as an exemplar in this study has important implications for the interpretation of the findings. Drawing on Bernstein (1999), Martin (2011) suggests that disciplines have predominantly horizontal or hierarchical knowledge structures. Here it is claimed that physics has the most hierarchical knowledge structure of all disciplines. Thus, the findings presented here should be taken as illustrative of the situation in disciplines with more hierarchical knowledge structures (such as the natural and applied sciences). Kuteeva and Airey (in review) find that the issue of the language of instruction in such disciplines is viewed as much less problematic than in disciplines with more horizontal knowledge structures (such as the arts, humanities and, to some extent, social sciences). See Bennett (2010) for a provocative discussion of language use in such disciplines.

  • 10.
    Airey, John
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. Uppsala University.
    Linder, Cedric
    Uppsala University.
    Social semiotics in university physics education: Leveraging critical constellations of disciplinary representations2015In: Science Education Research: Engaging learners for a sustainable future / [ed] Jari Lavonen, Kalle Juuti, Jarkko Lampiselkä, Anna Uitto, Kaisa Hahl, European Science Education Research Association , 2015Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Social semiotics is a broad construct where all communication is viewed as being realized through signs and their signification. In physics education we usually refer to these signs as disciplinary representations. These disciplinary representations are the semiotic resources used in physics communication, such as written and oral languages, diagrams, graphs, mathematics, apparatus and simulations. This alternative depiction of representations is used to build theory with respect to the construction and sharing of disciplinary knowledge in the teaching and learning of university physics. Based on empirical studies of physics students cooperating to explain the refraction of light, a number of theoretical constructs were developed. In this presentation we describe these constructs and examine their usefulness for problematizing teaching and learning in university physics. The theoretical constructs are: fluency in semiotic resources, disciplinary affordance and critical constellations.

    The conclusion formulates a proposal that has these constructs provide university physics teachers with a new set of meaningfully and practical tools, which will enable them to re-conceptualize their practice in ways that have the distinct potential to optimally enhance student learning.

  • 11.
    Airey, John
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. Uppsala University.
    Urban, Eriksson
    Uppsala University ; Kristianstad University.
    A Semiotic Analysis of the Disciplinary Affordances of the Hertzsprung-Russell Diagram in Astronomy2014In: The 5th International 360 Conference, Encompassing the multimodality of knowledge, May 8-10 2014, Aarhus University, Denmark, Aarhus: Aarhus University , 2014, 22- p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One of the central characteristics of disciplines is that they create their own particular ways of knowing the world through their discourse (Airey & Linder 2009). This process is facilitated by the specialization and refinement of disciplinary-specific semiotic resources over time. Nowhere is this truer than in the sciences, where it is the norm that disciplinary-specific representations have been introduced and then refined by a number of different actors (Airey 2009). As a consequence, many of the semiotic resources used in the sciences today still retain some traces of their historical roots. This makes the aquisition of disciplinary literacy (Airey, 2013) particularly problematic (see Eriksson et al. 2014 for an example from astronomy).

     In this paper we analyse one such disciplinary-specific semiotic resource from the field of Astronomy—the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. We audit the potential of this semiotic resource to provide access to disciplinary knowledge—what Fredlund et al (2012) have termed its disciplinary affordances. Our analysis includes consideration of the use of scales, labels, symbols, sizes and colour. We show how, for historical reasons, the use of these aspects in the resource may differ from what might be expected by a newcomer to the discipline.

    We suggest that some of the issues we highlight in our analysis may, in fact, be contributors to alternative conceptions and therefore propose that lecturers pay particular attention to the disambiguation of these features for their students.

  • 12.
    Airey, John
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages. Uppsala University.
    Urban, Eriksson
    Uppsala University ; Kristianstad University.
    What do you see here?: Using an analysis of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram in astronomy to create a survey of disciplinary discernment.2014In: The first Conference of the International Association for Cognitive Semiotics, Lund, Sweden, 25-27 Sept 2014, 2014, 52-53 p.Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Becoming part of a discipline involves learning to interpret and use a range of disciplinary-specific semiotic resources (Airey, 2009). These resources have been developed and assigned particular specialist meanings over time. Nowhere is this truer than in the sciences, where it is the norm that disciplinary-specific representations have been introduced and then refined by a number of different actors in order to reconcile them with subsequent empirical and theoretical advances. As a consequence, many of the semiotic resources used in the sciences today still retain some (potentially confusing) traces of their historical roots. However, it has been repeatedly shown that university lecturers underestimate the challenges such disciplinary specific semiotic resources may present to undergraduates (Northedge, 2002; Tobias, 1986).

    In this paper we analyse one such disciplinary-specific semiotic resource from the field of Astronomy—the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. First, we audit the potential of this semiotic resource to provide access to disciplinary knowledge—what Fredlund et al (2012) have termed its disciplinary affordances. Our analysis includes consideration of the use of scales, labels, symbols, sizes and colour. We show how, for historical reasons, the use of these aspects in the resource may differ from what might be expected by a newcomer to the discipline. Using the results of our analysis we then created an online questionnaire to probe what is discerned (Eriksson, Linder, Airey, & Redfors, in press) with respect to each of these aspects by astronomers and physicists ranging from first year undergraduates to university professors.

    Our findings suggest that some of the issues we highlight in our analysis may, in fact, be contributors to the alternative conceptions of undergraduate students and we therefore propose that lecturers pay particular attention to the disambiguation of these features for their students.

  • 13.
    Alatalo, Tarja
    et al.
    Dalarna University.
    Meier, Joanna
    Dalarna university.
    Frank, Elisabeth
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Information Sharing on Children’s Literacy Learning in the Transition From Swedish Preschool to School2017In: Journal of Research in Childhood Education, ISSN 0256-8543, E-ISSN 2150-2641, Vol. 31, no 2, 240-254 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Collaboration and continuity between school types are important factors

    that favor long-term learning and that need to be given attention in the

    transition between early childhood school institutions. This study highlights

    teachers’ experiences of information sharing during the transition from

    Swedish preschool to preschool class (i.e., from the child care to school)

    with regard to children’s literacy learning. To find out and evaluate the

    individual child’s development, the child’s actual and proximal development

    zones needs to be taken into account in the transition. It appears that

    some preschool teachers wish to share information on children’s literacy

    learning, but it is mainly about the children’s interest in literacy activities.

    Also the preschool class teachers’ wishes to know more about the children’s

    literacy learning are too much on a general level to be able to provide a

    good enough basis for planning literacy activities that fit every individual

    child. A large part of the outcomes derives from the preschool tradition that

    has viewed care as being core to its work and considered learning and

    achievement as domains associated with compulsory school. This article

    discusses whether the training of teachers in early childhood education

    needs a stronger focus on literacy learning.

  • 14.
    Alexandersson, Alexandra
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Swedish Language.
    Från E till A i samma text: Hur sju svensklärares och fem svensklärarstudenters bedömning av en elevtext varierar i helhet och detalj.2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to investigate how Swedish teachers and student teachers of Swedish vary in their assessment of a pupil’s text, in judging both the text as a whole and its parts. In the study the informants were asked to assess a pupil’s text (a text presenting an argument) from the national examination in Swedish 1 with the aid of an assessment matrix and then complete a questionnaire assessing the text as a whole and in its parts. The responses to the questionnaire were analysed statistically with a focus on how the assessments varied. A sociocultural and situated perspective was applied in the study, along with psychometry and the theory of discourses of writing, to give more perspectives on the results. The study found that the assessments varied between grades C and A for the text as a whole and between E and A for the aspects of argumentation, content and critical reading, contextual signals and reference connectors, introduction, conclusion, situational adaptation and self-sustaining. The study also found that the student teachers were generally stricter in their assessment. The greatest variations in the student teachers’ assessment were found to concern aspects of the communication discourse, while in the teachers’ assessment it was aspects of the construction discourse that revealed the greatest variation. The greatest difference between the two groups concerned aspects of the correction discourse.

  • 15.
    Allen, Christopher
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Problem, Tasks and Language Teaching2000In: LMS : Lingua, ISSN 0023-6330, Vol. 2, 25-30 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 16.
    Ammert, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Att spegla världen: Läromedelsstudier i teori och praktik2011Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Ammert, Niklas
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Att stimulera historiemedvetande2009In: Grundskoletidningen, ISSN 1652-7844, Vol. 3Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 18.
    Ammert, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    "Det känns mera meningsfullt om det handlar om det": Värdefrågor, elever och undervisningens innehåll2015In: Religionsdidaktiska studier / [ed] Torsten Löfstedt, Kalmar och Växjö: Linnaeus University Press, 2015, 5-18 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Ammert, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    En banbrytande historiedidaktiker2013In: I farmors kök blev jag människa: historiedidaktiska texter av K G Jan Gustafson / [ed] Niklas Ammert och Roland Hallgren, Lund: Sekel Bokförlag, 2013, 1, 19-28 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 20.
    Ammert, Niklas
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    En katastrofkanon: 1900-talets katastrofer i historieläroböcker2009In: Didaktisk Tidskrift, ISSN 1101-7686, Vol. 18, no 5, 377-392 p.Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Ammert, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    En ögonblicksbild av ondskan: Förintelsen och andra folkmord i svensk historieundervisning2015In: Historia vid skiljevägen: Historiekulturella sonderingar när och fjärran / [ed] Johan Dietsch, Maria Karlsson, Johan Stenfeldt, Ulf Zander, Höör: Agerings Bokförlag , 2015, 247-268 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Ammert, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Ethical Values and History: a mutual relationship?2013In: International Journal of Historical Learning, Teaching and Research, ISSN 1472-9466, Vol. 12, no 1, 5-15 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the last two decades, ethical values in the form of reconciling with the past and recognizing victimized groups in history, have become more common themes in history books and in history teaching, like a ‘moral turn’ in the writing of history. History didactics research points out that values issues and moral questions clarify issues and contexts, stimulating thinking over time and activating people’s historical consciousness. Previous research, however, often only states that there is a relationship. In this article, I describe and analyze on empirical grounds, first how values are approached, and have been approached, in Swedish history textbooks, and how history and values relate to each other. Thereafter, I describe how 15-year-old students in Sweden express the relationship between values and history. Central to the analysis is how the historical context can clarify values and at the same time, how values can function as an interface creating meaning and bringing together knowledge between the past, the present and the future.

  • 23.
    Ammert, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Ett innehåll förmedlas2011In: Att spegla världen: Läromedelsstudier i teori och praktik / [ed] Niklas Ammert, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2011, 1, 259-278 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 24.
    Ammert, Niklas
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Finns då (och) nu (och) sedan? Uttryck för historiemedvetande i läroböcker för grundskolan2004In: Historien är nu: En introduktion till historiedidaktiken / [ed] Klas-Göran Karlsson & Ulf Zander, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2004Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 25.
    Ammert, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Förväntningar och förekomst: Elevers förväntningar och läromedlens urval och presentation av kalla kriget-epoken2017In: NHM-2017, 29: Nordiska historikermøde, 2017Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Elever möter historia i en rad olika sammanhang; i media, i spel, i reklam, i filmer och i historiska faktaprogram på TV för att nämna några. Elevernas uppfattningar och kunskaper har därför sannolikt formats redan innan de möter skolans undervisning och därefter formas de som en parallell process. I skolans historieundervisning spelar läromedlen fortfarande en viktig roll. De används i olika utsträckning och på olika sätt, men de finns ändå där som en konstant. En intressant spänning kan därför uppstå mellan elevernas förkunskaper, deras förväntningar och den bild av det förflutna de möter i skolan. I denna presentation tar jag det inom historiedidaktiken tidigare svagt beforskade begreppet förväntning eller förväntan som utgångspunkt. Jag studerar vilka förväntningar eleverna har på, och vad de menar är viktigt och vad de vill lära sig om, en historisk epok som de ännu inte har studerat i skolan – kalla kriget. Elevernas förväntningar jämförs med läromedlens urval och beskrivning av epoken. Studien bygger på gruppintervjuer med svenska elever i årskurs 8 och en analys av historieläroböcker för årskurs 9. Resultaten diskuteras i ljuset av syften och innehållsbeskrivningen i den kursplan i historia som infördes i Sverige från 2011.

  • 26.
    Ammert, Niklas
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Gemenskap och ambivalens: Finsk-svenska möten i finlandssvenska läroböcker i historia2009In: Historisk Tidskrift för Finland, ISSN 0046-7596, Vol. 94, no 1, 1-19 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Ammert, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Historia som kunskap: Innehåll, mening och värden i möten med historia2013Book (Other academic)
  • 28.
    Ammert, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    History as knowledge: ethical values and meaning in encounters with history2015 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    What do you know when you know something about history? What is important to know and how do you learn? Adolescents encounter history everywhere: at school, in the family, in media and society. But how do adolescents perceive history and in what ways do aspects of meaning and ethical values affect the encounters with history? This study discusses how Swedish adolescents and teachers encounter, communicate and define knowledge about history, analysing the process from curricula and history textbooks to the world of the pupils.

  • 29.
    Ammert, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    History IRL: How participants perceive time travels2016In: Bridging Ages Conference: Sept 13-16, 2016, Kalmar, Sweden, 2016Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    To travel in time can be described as an encounter between now and then. The time traveller experiences a constructed past interpreted in present time. At the same time the time traveller could use the past as a mirror to learn something about herself. These multidimensional relations between the past and the present could be perceived and interpreted in a variety of ways. In this presentation I will discuss a typology to chategorize and analyze time travellers’ perceptions of the past.

  • 30.
    Ammert, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Inledning (Att spegla världen)2011In: Att spegla världen: Läromedelsstudier i teori och praktik / [ed] Niklas Ammert, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2011, 17-22 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 31.
    Ammert, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    'Ja utan ondska skulle det knappt finnas någon historia': Värden som bärare av historisk kunskap2012In: Historiedidaktik i Norden 9: Del I: Historiemedvetande - historiebruk / [ed] Per Eilasson, Hammarlund, Karl Gunnar, Lund, Erik, Nielsen, Carsten Tage, Malmö och Halmstad: Malmö högskola , 2012, 54-74 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Ammert, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Kontakt och kontrast: Historieämnets innehåll och dess relation till elever 1905-20052012Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 33.
    Ammert, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Meddelande till rymden2015In: Rymden och människan: Rymdforskning i humaniora, konst och samhällsvetenskap, 10-11 p.Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 34.
    Ammert, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Mening i möten med historia2016In: Möten med mening: Ämnesdidiaktiska fallstudier i konst och humaniora / [ed] Karin L. Eriksson, Lund: Nordic Academic Press, 2016, 19-33 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 35.
    Ammert, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Mot samma mål?2015In: Manus: Sveriges läromedelsförfattares förbunds tidskrift, ISSN 2000-4028, no 2Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 36.
    Ammert, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Mörkrets hjärta i klassrummet:: Historieundervisning och elevers uppfattningar om förintelsen: av Bo Persson2011In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 77, no 2, 186-187 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 37.
    Ammert, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Om läroböcker och studiet av dem2011In: Att spegla världen: Läromedelsstudier i teori och praktik / [ed] Niklas Ammert, Lund: Studentlitteratur, 2011, 25-42 p.Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Ammert, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Om vad och hur 'må' ni berätta?: undervisning om Förintelsen och andra folkmord2011Book (Other academic)
  • 39.
    Ammert, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    On Genocide and the Holocaust in Swedish History Teaching2015In: Historical Encounters: A journal of historical consciousness, historical cultures and history education, E-ISSN 2203-7543, Vol. 2, no 1, 58-69 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Teaching about the Holocaust and other genocides is emphasized in Swedish History teaching. In Sweden there is a public authority commisioned to work with issues related to tolerance, democracy and human rights. It is this context and under these conditions, that Swedish History teachers select a variety of topics for their students to learn, as part of the History curriculum. In addition to the Holocaust, they teach about crimes against humanity committed under communist regimes, the genocide of Tutsies in Rwanda, and mass murder and ethnic cleansing in former Yugoslavia. Teachers use a multiplicity of uses of history and teaching methods. They conduct a scientific use of history when focusing on the historical contexts and explaining the background, motives and consequences of genocide. Teachers also stress the students’ personal reflections and standpoints in a moral use of history. The teaching aims at developing understanding and empathy among students.

  • 40.
    Ammert, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Patterns of reasoning: A tentative model to analyse historical and moral consciousness among Swedish 9th grade students2015In: Book of Abstracts: NoFa5 Nordic Conference on Subject Education, 27-29 May 2015, University of Helsinki , 2015, 94-94 p.Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Students find ethical and moral issues central and interesting when they interpret history. History can offer explanations and references to moral values that are still valid – or not valid – in our time. At the same time moral values provide conceivable contexts that connect students to the past. Views on interrelations between the past and the present seem to interact with the students’ moral foundations, questions, interpretations, understanding or repudiation. On a societal level similar phenomena can be identified when groups of people turn to history, either to handle challenges or to apologize or heal wrongs of the past. Furthermore the National Curricula prescribe ethical dimensions in school education, not least for the subject of history.

    In this pilot study Swedish 9th grade students discuss a text from Christopher Brownings’ book Ordinary Men. The students’ answers are analysed in a theoretical model including different types of historical consciousness and different aspects of moral reasoning. The aim is to study if there are patterns of interrelations and, if so, how these patterns are manifested.

  • 41.
    Ammert, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    [recension av:] Sirkka Ahonen: Coming to terms with a dark past - how post-conflict societies deal with history2014In: Historielärarnas Förenings Årsskrift 2014, ISSN 0439-2434, 218-219 p.Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Ammert, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    To Bridge Time: Historical Consciousness in Swedish History Textbooks2010In: Journal of Educational Media, Memory and Society, ISSN 2041-6938, Vol. 2, no 1, 17-30 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the early 1990s, the concept of historical consciousness has been central to didactic research in Sweden. It has mostly been used as a theoretical framework on a macro-level or as an attempt to identify students' historical consciousness. This article applies the theoretical concept of historical consciousness to tangible source material: history textbooks from the twentieth century. It focuses on whether Swedish history textbooks for lower secondary school have articulated contexts that may be conducive to developing historical consciousness. The article employs a number of theoretical concepts—narratives, multichronology, identity, and values—in order to analyze perspectives that can be utilized to trigger historical consciousness.

  • 43.
    Ammert, Niklas
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    To Bridge Time: Historical Consciousness in Swedish History Textbooks During the 20th Century2009Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 44.
    Ammert, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Vad kan man när man kan något om historia?2013Other (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 45.
    Ammert, Niklas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Värden som bärare av historisk kunskap2011Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 46.
    Ammert, Niklas
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Sharp, Heather
    Working with the Cold War: Types of Knowledge in Swedish and Australian History textbook Activities2016In: Journal of Educational Media, Memory and Society, ISSN 2041-6938, E-ISSN 2041-6946, Vol. 8, no 2, 58-82 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a comparative analysis of pupils’ activities dealing with the Cold War in Swedish and Australian history textbooks. By focusing on text- book activities to which pupils respond in relation to their learning of a particular topic, this study identifies knowledge types included in a selection of history text- books. The study also focuses on the question whether, and if so how, social values are evident in activities concerning the Cold War. The authors develop a matrix that makes it possible to examine knowledge types and social values conveyed by ac- tivities. By analyzing textbook activities, this article exposes the hidden curriculum present in the textbooks on the basis of underlying and unstated values present in the activities, and at the same time identifies the way in which the selected text- books incorporate these values. 

  • 47.
    Andersson, Alfred
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Sport Science.
    Hur klär sig barn vid utomhusundervisning?: Ett kartläggning av femteklassares klädsel vid utomhusaktiviteter2017Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med denna studie är att undersöka vilka kläder barn har tillgång till hemma, och vilka kläder de väljer att använda i skolan.  Studien undersöker även hur mycket undervisning femteklassare har fått om klädsel vid utomhusaktiviteter, samt om detta går att koppla till deras val av kläder i skolan. Studien utgörs av en enkätundersökning med 116 elever i årskurs 5 i en medelstor stad i södra sverige. Enkäten var av formen gruppenkät och distribuerades till femteklassarna på fyra olika skolor i staden. Resultaten har redovisats i diagram och analyserats utifrån Maslows behovsteori. Resultatet visar att det inte är alla elever som har tillgång till lämplig utomhusklädsel, av de som har tillgång till lämplig klädsel är det inte alla som tar med den till skolan. Implikationerna av detta är att det finns elever som inte har möjlighet att delta i undervisningen på lika villkor om den utförs utomhus. Enstaka skillnader har hittats mellan stad och landsbygd gällande användandet av vissa utomhusplagg vid olika årstider. Studien har visat på att mindre än hälften av de tillfrågade eleverna säger sig ha haft undervisning om hur de ska klä sig utomhus, men ingen koppling har kunnat hittas mellan undervisningsgrad och vilka kläder eleverna faktiskt tar med sig till skolan.

  • 48.
    Andersson, Alfred
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics.
    Robin, Hoogstraten
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics.
    En studie om utomhusmatematik: Elevers erfarenheter och åminnelse av en lektion i utomhusmatematik.2017Independent thesis Advanced level (professional degree), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [sv]

    Syftet med denna studie är att undersöka hur elever upplever matematikundervisning utomhus samt vilket lektionsinnehåll eleverna kommer ihåg efter genomförd lektion.

    Studien utgörs av intervjuer med tolv elever i årskurs 5. Grunden för studien är en lektion som genomförts några veckor innan intervjuerna där utomhusmatematik använts som undervisningsmetod. Intervjuerna har bestått av frågor kring denna lektion och elevernas uppfattningar av den. Intervjuerna har genomförts i grupper om tre. Resultaten har redovisats i diagram och jämförts med tidigare forskning inom området. Resultatet antyder att utomhusmatematik har många fördelar, som exempelvis att abstrakt matematik kan konkretiseras, och att eleverna överlag har en positiv uppfattning om utomhusmatematik. En av de negativa aspekterna som eleverna kan se med utomhusmatematik är att det kan bli oordning och brist på fokus bland eleverna. Vi ser att detta problem skulle kunna bero på val av plats för att genomföra undervisningen. Elevernas tidigare associationer till en plats kan påverka ordning och fokus i gruppen.

  • 49.
    Andersson, Melissa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    La pluriculturalidad en las clases de español como lengua extranjera: competencia sociocultural2017Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    For people in Sweden one of the favourites places to go on vacation is Spain. It is warm, inexpensive and they like Spanish culture, this helps explain why the Spanish language is so popular in schools in Sweden.

    To learn a foreign language means more than learning how to speak and writing, it also means learning about the culture of that language because the culture is intrinsically related to the language. Additionally, is very significant as teacher to give your students the knowledge of sociocultural of Spanish speaking countries, the knowledge of the world and in this way create multicultural students.

    For this reason, we decided to do a quantitative research about what sociocultural topics are thought in the classroom in Lulea (Sweden) and how teachers are developing multiculturalism in their students.

    As result of our work we can mention that teachers include sociocultural topics in their classes but there are certain sociocultural subjects that are not taught, we could also confirm that the textbook has many gaps in sociocultural subjects.

  • 50.
    Andersson, Niclas
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science. Linnaeus University, Faculty of Science and Engineering, School of Engineering.
    Förberedelse för internationella studier, praktik och jobb i gymnasieskolan: En studie av hur elever ser på förekomsten av information om möjligheter till internationella utbyten2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to investigate how well informed and prepared Swedish students are for international studies, work or internship. The result shows that 85 percent of the responding students do not think that they receive sufficient information regarding studies, work or internship abroad. In comparison to the 79 percent of the students who are interested in international experience, the unsatisfied need for information is clear.

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