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  • 1.
    Agevall, Ola
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    Kompendium i komparativ metodik2016Report (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Agevall, Ola
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    Land, Law and Money: Profession, state, and knowledge-base in the case of 19th century surveyors2011In: 10th conference of the European Sociological Association, 7th to 10th september 2011, Geneva, Switzerland, 2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Definitions and theories professions and professionalization have long been tailored on a set of professions established in England during the 19th century. Chartered surveyors belong in that group, but have not received the attention afforded to other members of the core set. This paper, conceived as a contribution to a theory of the relation between state, knowledge and profession, draws on the historical case of 19th century British surveyors. It analyses the interface between state and profession, in an age when it became increasingly important to “reconcile the principle that the domain of the political must be restricted, with the recognition of the vital political implications of formally private activities.” Surveyors were claimants to a configuration of tasks – centred on the nexus of land, law and money – which made them an important auxiliary to the state apparatus and its technologies. This paper traces, through comparison of British surveyors over time and through juxtaposition with Swedish surveyors, how these tasks, and a corresponding knowledge-base, were shaped by the inclusion of new subspecialties and a complex legal environment.

  • 3.
    Agevall, Ola
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    Olofsson, Gunnar
    The professional field of higher education: A longue durée view of institution and corps in the Swedish university system2012Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The modern field of higher education, and within it the corps of university teachers, takes on a dual significance in the context of the broader professional landscape. On the one hand it constitutes a professional field in its own right. On the other hand, the university is the institution through which the other professions are reproduced. It is with this latter aspect in mind that Harold Perkin characterised the university teacher as a key profession (Perkin, 1969).

    This paper sets out to map the relation between social function, institution, corps, and cognitive base in the Swedish system of higher education, from the beginnings in 1477 until the present day. We assume (a) that these aspects evolve in different tempi, and (b) that they coalesce into particular configurations. We argue that this framework allows us to address central issues regarding the historical trajectory of higher education inSweden. Through which mechanisms did a medieval institution, catering primarily to ecclesiastical needs, acquire a capacity to accommodate and become the custodian of scientific knowledge? How has the increasing differentiation of the cognitive base affected the composition of the corps? How have shifts in the composition of the corps affected the internal workings of the university? And what role does this play in the formation of university teaching as a key profession?

  • 4.
    Agevall, Ola
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    Olofsson, Gunnar
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    Platzer, Ellinor
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    Sjöstrand, Glenn
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    Between science and occupation: Knowledge, academization, and the route from university to labour market2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Albinsson, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Department of Health and Caring Sciences.
    Arnesson, Kerstin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Kommunala chefers kommunikation via digitala verktyg: betydelse för arbetssituation och chefskap2018In: Arbetsmarknad & Arbetsliv, ISSN 1400-9692, Vol. 24, no 3-4, p. 26-41Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Att vara chef inom en kommunal förvaltning innebär att utgöra en del av kommunens multifunktionella organisering, som i stor utsträckning styrs av lagstiftning. Organisationen är skattefinansierad och förväntas beakta delvis motstridiga krav såsom transparens, representation, kontroll, medbestämmande, likabehandling, öppenhet, offentlighet samt insyn i beslutsprocesser. Positionen kan närmast beskrivas som en balansakt där chefen i sin vardagsverklighet måste förhålla sig till de olika krav och förväntningar som ställs av politiker, medborgare och medarbetare. I chefskapet ingår även intern och extern informationsöverföring och ett ständigt flöde av horisontella och vertikala interaktioner. I föreliggande studie har en multimetodisk forskningsansats tillämpats i syfte att ringa in 202 kommunala chefers kommunikation genom användandet av olika digitala verktyg.  Resultatet visar att de digitala verktyg som cheferna använde i sitt arbete förenklade och effektiviserade kommunikationen inom och utanför organisationen. Ett återkommande dilemma var att cheferna hade svårt att leva upp till normen om hur en chef bör vara. Fysisk närvaro i de verksamheter som man hade ansvar för upplevdes som ouppnåeligt, men tycktes heller inte krävas av medarbetarna. Organisationens digitala arbetsmiljö blev då ett sätt för cheferna att vara tillgängliga och skapa en kollaborativ kommunikation, något som stödjer idén om ett ledarskap, präglat av support.

  • 6.
    Andersson, Carl
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    Pettersson, Stina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    Den som väntar på något gott väntar alltid för länge: En studie om Generation Y och deras värderingar i arbetslivet2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study aims to examine the work-related values of Generation Y and why they exhibit these values. In order to understand this group of people and explain the reasons to their values the theoretical framework will primarily be Zygmunt Bauman’s theory of the individual society and Göran Ahrne’s theory of organizations. In a small addition, this study also aims to assess the possible consequences of these values in the labour market. Especially in relation to organization’s Employer Branding, i.e. their strategies to attract, motivate and retain workers. Previous research shows that work-related values differ between generations. We are using a qualitative method collecting data through interviews to get a detailed and nuanced view of their values.

    The study indicates that the people of Generation Y value development and social environment (including leadership) the most. It serves as ways to cope with the uncertainties of the flexible society. They also seem to value instant gratification as a result of being used to getting that through innovations such as the Internet. If this need is not satisfied it is likely that their motivation drops and that they start looking for alternative jobs. They seem to be driven by the need for development and this combines with their lack of patience to result in frequent job changes. Organizations will therefore face a difficult challenge to retain members of this generation. This task will be particularly notable as Generation Y soon becomes the largest generational group in the labour market. 

  • 7.
    Andersson, Carolin
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    Från förort till prestige: En studie av invandrarelevers väg till och igenom stadens prestigegymnasium2013Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (One Year)), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 8.
    Andréasson, Frida
    et al.
    Swedish Family Care Competence Centre (NKA).
    Hanson, Elizabeth
    Eurocarers, Belgium.
    Lancioni, Cristina
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Papa, Roberta
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Lamura, Giovanni
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    The INNOVAGE-Eurocarers platform and current ICT-based services for informal carers of older people in Sweden2015In: Irish Ageing Studies Review, ISSN 1649-9972, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 88-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Different support services for family carers are available in Sweden through information and communication technologies (ICTs) since late 1990s, like ACTION, My Joice, IPPI, ‘The Gap’, and Carer Sweden’s online ‘Carer’s Book’. The INNOVAGE-Eurocarers platform aimed to complement the offer of web services to carers through the provision of a new tailored package.

    Methods: The Swedish pilot test enrolled around 50 carers through contacts with professionals working with carers in different municipalities. They could access the following web-based services: information resources; individual support via e-mail and private messages; group support via social network and forum. Periodical writing activities were asked to active users in the forum, alternating expressive writing (EW) and time management (TM) writing tasks. Periodical reminders were sent in order to increase user involvement.

    Results: Users were predominantly older, female carers, of which two thirds were over 65 years old. The web platform was perceived as a flexible tool, potentially accessible at any time, which gave users the possibility to exploit their experience as carers with others in similar situations. This peer exchange seemed to improve self empowerment, sense of solidarity and mutual learning. However, usage of the web platform was limited due to the low level of digital skills of some carers.

    Conclusions: Although results confirmed usefulness and appropriateness of implemented web services, it is fundamental to address the issue of usability and accessibility in order to ensure a wider accessibility. An option might be to offer initial digital skill training and continuous technical support for computer novices.

  • 9.
    Axelsson, Lillan
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Avebo Björkman, Liselotte
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Political Science.
    Förtroende för offentliga organisationer: Varför har vissa offentliga organisationer högre förtroende hos medborgarna än andra?2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 180 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 10. Barbabella, Francesco
    Family carers: Technology-based support services2015Book (Refereed)
  • 11.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    [ Review of ] Alison Pilnick, Jon Hindmarsh, Virginia Teas Gill (eds.): Communication in Healthcare Settings. Policy, Participation and New Technologies2013In: Czech Sociological Review, ISSN 1210-3861, Vol. 3, p. 485-487Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    Italian National Institute of Health and Science on Aging (INRCA), Italy.
    [ Review of ] Alison Pilnick, Jon Hindmarsh, Virginia Teas Gill (Eds.): Communication in Healthcare Settings. Policy, Participation and New Technologies2013In: Czech Sociological Review, ISSN 1210-3861, Vol. 49, no 3, p. 485-487Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    [ Review of ] Blanche Le Bihan, Claude Martin and Trudie Knijn (eds.): Work and Care Under Pressure. Care Arrangements Across Europe. Amsterdam 2013: Amsterdam University Press, 197 pp2014In: Czech Sociological Review, ISSN 1210-3861, Vol. 6, p. 999-1001Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 14.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    Italian National Institute of Health and Science on Aging (INRCA), Italy.
    [ Review of ] Blanche Le Bihan, Claude Martin, Trudie Knijn (eds.): Work and Care Under Pressure. Care Arrangements Across Europe2014In: Czech Sociological Review, ISSN 1210-3861, Vol. 50, no 6, p. 999-1001Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    et al.
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Chiatti, Carlos
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy ; Lund University.
    Di Rosa, Mirko
    Marche Polytechnic University, Italy ; National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    La bussola di NNA: lo stato dell'arte basato sui dati2015In: L'assistenza agli anziani non autosufficienti in Italia: 5° Rapporto, Un futuro da ricostruire / [ed] N.N.A., Rimini: Maggioli Editore, 2015, p. 15-33Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 16.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    et al.
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Chiatti, Carlos
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy ; Marche Polytechnic University, Italy ; Lund University.
    Di Rosa, Mirko
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA).
    Gori, Cristiano
    Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Italy ; Istituto per la ricerca sociale, Italy ; London School of Economics, UK.
    La bussola di N.N.A.: lo stato dell'arte basato sui dati2013In: L'assistenza agli anziani non autosufficienti in Italia: 4° Rapporto, Tra crisi e ripartenza / [ed] N.N.A., Rimini: Maggioli Editore, 2013, p. 11-28Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 17.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    et al.
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Chiatti, Carlos
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy ; Marche Polytechnic University, Italy ; Lund University.
    Di Rosa, Mirko
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Pelliccia, Laura
    Alcuni profili dell’assistenza nelle regioni2013In: L'assistenza agli anziani non autosufficienti in Italia: 4° Rapporto, Tra crisi e ripartenza / [ed] N.N.A., Rimini: Maggioli Editore, 2013, p. 29-43Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    et al.
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Chiatti, Carlos
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Lamura, Giovanni
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Increasing inclusion and participation of the young-old and the old-old2013In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 17, no Supplement, June/July, p. S132-S132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: While healthy ageing represents a pre-condition for older people to enjoy a longer and disability-free life span, quality of life in older age is dependent also upon society’s ability to grant individuals social protection, as well as to promote their active participation in the community until the very end of life. These issues constitute a challenge for current and future research on ageing.

    Method: A 2-year consultation process with over 70 international experts was conducted within the FUTURAGE work-stream focussedon social and economic resources in ageing research. This process allowed a comprehensive discussion on most relevant social participation and protection issues involving scientists, users’ organisations, policy makers and other stakeholders, which led to a set of specific research priorities.

    Results: The main challenges identified for future ageing research concerning social participation are: ageism; migration; life-long learning; digital divide; spirituality; volunteering; mobility and accessibility; discrimination in the labour market; consumption and access to products and services; and work-life balance. As for social protection, the following core issues have been spotted: sustainability; support to informal carers (also through ICT-based services); efficiency; access to care; cost-effectiveness and quality of interventions; initiatives to improve intergenerational solidarity.

    Conclusion: Societal challenges related to social participation and sustainability of social protection systems clearly urge new actions in research, practices and policy on ageing. In particular, the identification of over-arching issues, barriers and enablers contributes to strengthen scientific research in the field, as well as to support policy makers in improving social life and quality of life of older people.

  • 19.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    et al.
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Chiatti, Carlos
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Principi, Andrea
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Lamura, Giovanni
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Volontariato in età matura: opportunità, barriere e best practices per il coinvolgimento degli anziani2011In: Quaderni Europei sul Nuovo Welfare, ISSN 1972-4543, Vol. 16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [it]

    L’articolo propone una rassegna sulle opportunità e i maggiori ostacoli in merito alla partecipazione delle persone anziane alle attività di volontariato. A livello internazionale, il dibattito sul volontariato in età matura si è sviluppato principalmente negli Stati Uniti, mentre l’Europa appare ancora indietro nella ricerca: oltre che auspicare un aumento delle indagini sull’argomento a livello nazionale, sarebbe utile promuovere ricerche comparative e trasversali, presenti ancora in numero esiguo. Tra le evidenze attualmente disponibili, risulta che gli anziani più propensi a svolgere attività di volontariato sono quelli “più giovani”, in buona salute, con un livello di istruzione ed una posizione socio-economica elevati, impegnati principalmente in organizzazioni religiose che operano nel settore dei servizi alla persona. Le principali barriere sono invece rappresentate da pratiche discriminatorie legate all’età. A livello internazionale si rivela controverso il rapporto tra l’impegno degli anziani nel volontariato e in altre importanti attività quali il lavoro e la cura informale. Ad ogni modo, emerge con forza l’esigenza di implementare politiche di reclutamento dei volontari senior, dal momento che le poche esistenti sono spesso poco incisive: in questo senso, un supporto importante può essere fornito dalle esperienze realizzate nel contesto statunitense, le quali hanno prodotto negli ultimi anni delle best practices.

  • 20.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    et al.
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Di Rosa, Mirko
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Chiatti, Carlos
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Melchiorre, Maria Gabriella
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Lamura, Giovanni
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Opportunities and challenges of migrant work in the Italian long-term care system2013In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 17, no Supplement, Juny/july, p. S133-S133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Italy is one of the most aged countries in the world, with a longstanding tradition of family care of the dependent elderly. Inrecent times, however, Italy has been witnessing in-depth social and cultural changes, which have been negatively impacting on informal care provision. In addition, the public long-term care (LTC) system highly relies on cash-for-care schemes for supporting older people, whereas “formal” care services are characterised by weak coverage and intensity. This situation has led to a remarkable increase in theprivate employment of migrant care workers (MCWs), whose number increased by four times in the last two decades.

    Method: An overview of MCWs phenomenon in Italy is provided through the analysis of empirical data retrieved by available official sources at national level, as well as by results from own surveys conducted in recent years on large samples of MCWs.

    Results: The following opportunities and challenges concerning MCWs’ employment in the LTC sector were identified: improve MCW’s capacity to deliver quality care; reduce therisk of elder abuse and neglect and of meeting MCWs’ own care needs; increase their social integration in destination countries and reduce “care drain” in sending countries; and how to improve stakeholders’ involvement for a better exchange of good practices and more effective policy measures.

    Conclusion: In these years, privately employed MCWs have contributed to change the traditional Italian “family care model” into a new “migrant-in-the-family care model”. However, the issue concerning the sustainability of this model within the Italian LTC system in the future is still open.

  • 21.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    et al.
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Di Rosa, Mirko
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy ; Marche Polytechnic University, Italy.
    Lamura, Giovanni
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Come opera l’assistenza domiciliare negli altri paesi europei?2013In: Welfare Oggi, ISSN 2240-3590, no 4, p. 30-34Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    et al.
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Di Rosa, Mirko
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Melchiorre, Maria Gabriella
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Lamura, Giovanni
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    The employment of migrant workers in Italy’s elder care: Opportunities and challenges2016In: Ageing in Contexts of Migration / [ed] Ute Karl, Sandra Torres, London: Routledge, 2016, p. 159-171Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    et al.
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Lancioni, Cristina
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Andréasson, Frida
    Swedish Family Care Competence Centre (NKA).
    Papa, Roberta
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Poli, Arianna
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Salzmann, Benjamin
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Efthymiou, Areti
    Eurocarers, Belgium.
    Lamura, Giovanni
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    How web-based services can support family carers of older people: New ways to promote social inclusion and quality of life2015In: Irish Ageing Studies Review, ISSN 1649-9972, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 87-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Family carers can be negatively influenced by their situation, in terms of stress, social isolation, economic constraints and other difficulties. Web-based services addressing carers’ needs represent an efficient support. The goal of the INNOVAGE work package 3(WP3) study was to develop and test a new multilingual web platform for supporting family carers of older people, to be implemented in 27 European countries.

    Methods: A review of good practices and a consultation with stakeholders were conducted for identifying most appropriate types of services to be developed and tested. The prototype of web platform included information resources and interactive services for both peer and professional support. A convenient, overall sample of around 130 family carers was enrolled in three countries (Italy, Germany and Sweden) and could access services for 12-17 weeks. Data were collected through questionnaires and focus groups concerning impact onquality of life, social support, self-perception of carer’s role, as well as usability, usefulness and appropriateness of services.

    Results: Active users were generally satisfied with support (information, advice, counselling) provided by moderators (social workers or psychologists) and peers. Usability and appropriateness were confirmed, although some refinements were suggested and users with low digital skills often needed technical support. A portion of the sample remained inactive even if stimulation strategies were adopted.

    Conclusions: The pilot study confirmed the INNOVAGE Eurocarers web platform is a useful tool for family carers. Some challenges still exist for implementation in relation to digital skills required and users’ preferences on services at country level.

  • 24.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    et al.
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Melchiorre, Maria Gabriella
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Quattrini, Sabrina
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Papa, Roberta
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Lattanzio, Fabrizia
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Lamura, Giovanni
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Caring For People With Multiple Chronic Conditions In Italy: Policy And Practices2015In: Irish Ageing Studies Review, ISSN 1649-9972, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 71-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: An estimated 50 million people in the European Union live with multiple chronic diseases. In Italy, around 26.6% of the population aged 16 to 64 years, reported to have at least one long-standing illness or health problem in 2011. Moreover, around 46% of the population over 50 is suffering from multimorbidity. Some programmes addressing adult or older people with multimorbidity have been introduced.

    Methods: Data for the ICARE4EU study were collected in the first half of 2014. Eligible programmes focussed on providing care for adult people with two or more medically diagnosed chronic or long lasting diseases (at least onesomatic), involved formalised cooperation between two or more services (at least one medical) and evaluation was available. For each programme an on-line questionnaire was completed and included four main subjects: Patientcentredness, Management, Use of E-health technologies, and Financing systems.

    Results: In Italy, four programmes met the inclusion criteria. They address both daily patient care and policy/managerial levels. Integration of care services, improved collaboration between care providers, changes in resource utilisation and involvement of informal carers have been observed. In two programmes, older patients are addressed as specific subgroup and in two cases animprovement in the use of E-health tools has emerged.

    Conclusions: In Italy, new policies and integrated care programmes addressing multimorbidity have been recently introduced in some areas, with good preliminary results.

  • 25.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    et al.
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Schmidt, Andrea
    European Centre for Social Welfare Policy and Research, Austria.
    Chiatti, Carlos
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Lamura, Giovanni
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Impact of ICT-based interventions on family caregivers: A cross-analysis of 54 good practices in Europe2013In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 17, no Supplement, June/July, p. S447-S447Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Information and communication technologies (ICTs) have gained an increasing relevance for delivering innovative care and support services for dependent older people and their family caregivers. Although ICT-based interventions can vary remarkably in terms of functions, target users, operational aspects and technologies used, little knowledge is available concerning their implementationand impact in Europe, a gap that the CARICT project (http://is.jrc.es/pages/EAP/eInclusion/carers.html) has tried to fill.

    Method: 54 ICT-based interventions addressing needs of older peopleor their family caregivers have been identified in 12 European countries through internet search, literature review and expert interviews. Reports have been delivered for each case studied, and cross-analysed to better understand their potential impact at micro, meso and macro level.

    Results: Little evidence was found for positive outcomes at micro-level, including improvements in users’ health relatedquality of life and social inclusion. At meso-level, implementation of 1st/2nd generation telecare contributes to reduce hospitalization and institutionalization rates of older users, as well asto cost savings for local care providers. At macro-level, only one intervention shows concrete effects on a larger scale through a targeted program evaluation, while most ICT-based interventions do not useany tool to assess their impact, and can thus demonstrate only technology acceptance or users’ satisfaction.

    Conclusion: The lack of relevant evidence at all levels, as well as difficulties in comparing and generalising results, strongly urge practitioners to improve impact assessment methodologies and researchers to develop a better general framework of ICT potentials at a conceptual, theoretical and methodological level in this area.

  • 26.
    Basic, Goran
    Lund University.
    A case of what?: Methodological lessons from a reanalysis of conflicts within Swedish Juvenile Care2013In: Journal of Comparative Social Work, ISSN 0809-9936, E-ISSN 0809-9936, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 222-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    “Collaboration” is generally portrayed as being beneficial to authorities, even if previous collaborative research shows that conflicts are common between authorities who are supposed to cooperate. What takes place when different actors in the collaboration meet in practice? And what is the best way to analyse this? In qualitative studies, it is often problematic to go from an exhaustive analysis of individual empirical instances to an overall picture of the context or phenomenon in which all instances taken together can be viewed as a case. Years of close engagement with the data may interfere with the analyst’s capacities and opportunities to contextualize a study more broadly and theoretically, and detailed knowledge about a range of situations in the field may make novel contextualizations difficult. This article discusses how to overcome such obstacles, using examples from a study about a “collaboration” project in Swedish youth care.

  • 27.
    Basic, Goran
    Lund University.
    Coherent Triads and Collaboration Identities in Swedish Youth Care2015In: International Conference on Innovation and Research in Arts and Humanities, Institute of Mobin Cultural Ambassadors, Istanbul, Turkey (20150827), 2015, p. 1-18Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous collaboration research shows that problems and conflicts sometimes arise as a part of collaboration. Researchers have highlighted the importance of narratives, but have not focused on narratives about successful cooperation. This article tries to fill this gap by analyzing stories of successful cooperation, even if it unfolds during shorter interaction sequences. The aim is to analyze how and when the actors within youth care portray successful cooperation, and which discursive patterns are involved in the construction of this phenomenon. The empirical basis for this study is formed by 147 recorded interviews with institution-placed youths, their parents, and different occupational categories within the social services and the Swedish National Board of Institutional Care. The personal interactive aspect of cooperation among actors in youth care is important to the success of a collaboration. This aspect also appears to have significance for producing and reproducing joint collaboration identities. However, joint collaboration identities and the coherence triad can limit the sphere of cooperation to the youth care entities: the juvenile (or his/her parents) is left out.

  • 28.
    Basic, Goran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Pedagogy and Learning.
    Coherent triads and successful inter-professional collaboration: narratives of professional actors in the Swedish child welfare system2018In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to analyze how and when the professional actors within the Swedish child welfare system portray successful cooperation and determine which discursive patterns are involved in the construction of this phenomenon. The empirical basis for this study is formed by 147 recorded interviews with institution-placed youths, their parents, and different occupational categories within the social services and the Swedish National Board of Institutional Care. Analytical findings with the following themes are presented: (1) coherent vision triad, (2) coherent rhetorically accepted triad, and (3) coherent exclusive triad. The personal interactive aspect of cooperation among professional actors in the care of children is important for successful collaboration. This aspect also appears to be significant for producing and reproducing joint collaboration identities. However, joint collaboration identities and the coherence triad can limit the sphere of cooperation to the entities involved in the care of youths and the juvenile or his/her parents are left out.

  • 29.
    Basic, Goran
    Lund University.
    Coherent Triads in Swedish Youth Care2015In: Contemporary Youth Contemporary Risk. Book of abstracts, Journal of Youth Studies Conference, Copenhagen, 30 March - 1 April, 2015, 2015, p. 155-155Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous collaboration research shows that problems and conflicts sometimes arise as a part of collaboration. Researchers have highlighted the importance of narratives, but have not focused on narratives about successful cooperation. This article tries to fill this gap by analyzing stories of successful cooperation, even if it unfolds during shorter interaction sequences. The aim is to analyze how and when the actors within youth care portray successful cooperation, and which discursive patterns are involved in the construction of this phenomenon. The empirical basis for this study is formed by 147 recorded interviews with institution-placed youths, their parents, and different occupational categories within the social services and the Swedish National Board of Institutional Care. The personal interactive aspect of cooperation among actors in youth care is important to the success of a collaboration. This aspect also appears to have significance for producing and reproducing joint collaboration identities. However, joint collaboration identities and the coherence triad can limit the sphere of cooperation to the youth care entities: the juvenile (or his/her parents) is left out.

  • 30.
    Basic, Goran
    Lund University.
    Coherent Triads: Observed Successful Collaboration in Youth Care2015In: Creativity in Social Sciences. Proceedings of CIL 2015: Second Edition of International Conference of Humanities and Social Sciences - Creativity, Imaginary, Language. Ed. Claudiu Marian Bunăiaşu, Elena Rodica Opran, Dan Valeriu Voinea., 2015, p. 91-105Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Earlier research on collaboration shows that cooperation comprises problems and conflicts. The purpose of this study is to describe successful collaboration even if it unfolds during shorter interaction frequencies. In the article, interactive patterns involved in the construction of these phenomena will be analyzed. Forming the empirical basis for this study are 119 field observations of organized meetings and informal meetings before and after organized meetings, during visits to youth care institutions in Sweden, social services offices, and the Swedish National Board of Institutional Care. In this study, markers are used to define successful cooperation in the empirical material, so that actors who belong to at least three different categories will be identified. The professional actors can also shape a coherent triad with young people or parents in cases where past conflicts arise. When some professionals create a distance from other professional partners, conflicts can be erased so as to generate new conditions for coherence of the triad. Construction and reconstruction of collaboration success is an ongoing, interactive process. Presentation of the proper interaction moral is created and re-created during interactions and appears in the myriad everyday interactions.

  • 31.
    Basic, Goran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy. Lund University.
    Concentration Camp Rituals: An Extreme Case of Insecurity: Rituali u koncentracionim logorima: ekstremni slučaj nesigurnosti2014In: Journal of Criminal Justice Issues, ISSN 1512-5505, Vol. 14, no 5-6, p. 21-33Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reason(s) for writing and research problem(s): This article analyzes the experiences retold by former concentration camp detainees who were placed in concentration camps like civilians at the beginning of the Bosnian war in the 1990s. Aims of the paper (scientific and/or social): The article aims to describe the recounted social interaction rituals after time spent in a concentration camp as well as identifying how these interactions are symbolically dramatized. Methodology/Design: The empirical material for this study was collected through qualitative interviews held with nine former camp detainees and four close relatives. Research/paper limitations: The analyzed empirical examples revealed how the camp detainees’ victim identity is created, recreated, and retained in contrast to ‘the others’ – the camp guards. The camp detainees’ portrayal of their victim identity presents their humiliated self through dissociation from the camp guards. Results/Findings: The detainees’ new (altered) moral career is presented as a result of the imprisonment at the camp and the repetitive humiliation and power rituals. The importance of the camp guards was emphasized in these rituals, in which the detainees’ new selves, characterized by moral dissolution and fatigue, emerged. General conclusion: In their stories of crime and abuse in the concentration camps, the detainees reject the guards’ actions and the designation of ‘concentration camp detainee’. The retold stories of violation and power rituals in the camps show that there was little space for individuality. Nevertheless, resistance and status rituals along with adapting to the conditions in the camps seem to have generated some room for increased individualization. To have possessed some control and been able to resist seems to have granted the detainees a sense of honor and self-esteem, not least after the war. Their narratives today represent a form of continued resistance. Research/paper validity: The interviewees’ rejections of the guards’ actions and their forced “camp detainee” status could be interpreted as an expression of de-ritualization, leading away from their own earlier experiences. The subsequently illustrated myriad of everyday interactions, which can be distinguished analytically in the interviewees’ stories, expose rituals of humiliation, power, resistance, and status. Through these, we see the interviewees’ loss of identity, others’ recognition of one’s identity, emotional involvement, and different symbols of resistance.

  • 32.
    Basic, Goran
    Lund University.
    Concentration Camp Rituals: Narrative of Former Bosnian Detainees2013In: Crisis, Critique and Change. Abstract book. 11th European Sociological Association Conference, Turin, Italy, August 28-31, 2013, 2013, p. 404-404Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyses the experiences retold by former concentration camp detainees who were placed in concentration camps at the beginning of the Bosnian war in the 1990s. The article aims to describe the recounted social interaction rituals after having spent time in a concentration camp as well as identifying how these interactions are symbolically dramatized. In their stories of crime and abuse in the concentration camps the detainees reject the guards actions and the category: ”concentration camp detainee”. The retold stories of violation- and power rituals in the camps show that there was little space for individuality. Never the less, resistance- and status rituals along with adapting to the conditions in the camps seem to have generated some room for increased individualization. To have possessed somewhat control and been able to resist seems to have granted a sense of honor and self-esteem for the detainees, not least after the war.

  • 33.
    Basic, Goran
    Lund University.
    Concentration Camp Rituals: Narratives of Former Bosnian Detainees2017In: Humanity & Society, ISSN 0160-5976, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 73-94Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the German camps during the Second World War, the aim was to kill from a distance, and the camps were highly efficient in their operations. Previous studies have thus analyzed the industrialized killing and the victims' survival strategies. Researchers have emphasized the importance of narratives but they have not focused on narratives about camp rituals, or analyzed post-war interviews as a continued resistance and defense of one’s self. This article tries to fill this gap by analyzing stories told by former detainees in concentration camps in the Bosnian war during the 1990s. The article aims to describe a set of recounted interaction rituals as well as to identify how these rituals are dramatized in interviews. The retold stories of humiliation and power in the camps indicate that there was little space for individuality and preservation of self. Nevertheless, the detainees seem to have been able to generate some room for resistance, and this seems to have granted them a sense of honor and self-esteem, not least after the war. Their narratives today represent a form of continued resistance.

  • 34.
    Basic, Goran
    Lund University.
    Concentration camp rituals: Narratives of former Bosnian detainees2014In: Ett inkluderande samhälle? En inkluderande sociologi? Sociologidagarna 2014, Göteborg, March 13-15, 2014, 2014Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Basic, Goran
    Lund University.
    Conditions for Reconciliation: Narratives of Survivors from the War in Bosnia and Herzegovina2015In: Journal of Criminal Justice and Security, ISSN 1580-0253, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 107-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The aim of this article was to analyze the retold experiences of 27 survivors from the 1990s war in Bosnia and Herzegovina. I have examined verbal markers of reconciliation and implacability and analyzed the described terms for reconciliation that are being actualized in the narratives. Design: The material for the study was gathered through qualitative interviews with 27 individuals who survived the war in north-western Bosnia and Herzegovina. This study joins those narrative traditions within sociology where oral presentations are seen as both discursive- and experience-based. In addition, I perceive the concept of reconciliation as an especially relevant component in those specific stories that I analyzed. Findings: Stories on implacability, reconciliation, and conditions for reconciliation are not shaped only in relation to the war as a whole but also in relation to an individual’s wartime actions and those of others. In these stories, implacability is the predominant feature, but reconciliation is said to be possible if certain conditions are met. Examples of these conditions are justice for war victims, perpetrator recognition of crimes, and emotional commitment from the perpetrator (by showing remorse and shame, for example). Value: Previous research on post-war society emphasized structural violence with subsequent reconciliation processes. Researchers have focused on the importance of narratives, but they have neither analyzed conditions for reconciliation in post-war interviews. This article tries to fill this gap by analyzing the stories told by survivors of the Bosnian war during the 1990s.

  • 36.
    Basic, Goran
    Lund University.
    Constructing “Ideal Victim” Stories of Bosnian War Survivors2015In: Social Inclusion, ISSN 2183-2803, E-ISSN 2183-2803, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 25-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research on victimhood during and after the Bosnian war has emphasized the importance of narratives but has not focused on narratives about victimhood or analyzed post-war interviews as a competition for victimhood. This article tries to fill this gap using stories told by survivors of the Bosnian war during the 1990s. In this analysis of the retold experiences of 27 survivors of the war in northwestern Bosnia, the aim is to describe the informants’ portrayal of “victimhood” as a social phenomenon as well as analyzing the discursive patterns that contribute to constructing the category “victim”. When, after the war, different categories claim a “victim” status, it sparks a competition for victimhood. All informants are eager to present themselves as victims while at the same time the other categories’ victim status are downplayed. In this reproduction of competition for the victim role, all demarcations that were played out so successfully during the war live on.

  • 37.
    Basic, Goran
    Lund University.
    Construction of morally correct actions: In the stories of violence during the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina2015In: DO THE RIGHT THING! Anthropology and morality. SANT-konferens 2015, Lund, Sweden, April 17-19, 2015, 2015, p. 27-28Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is based on different types of empirical material, especially recorded interviews, carried out with 27 survivors of the war in northwestern Bosnia and Herzegovina, and field observations. The focus lies on analyzing interviewees’ and field notes description of war-time violence and also analyzing discursive patterns that contribute in constructing the phenomenon “war violence”. This study shows that narratives on the phenomenon “war violence” depict a decay of pre-war social order. The use of violence during the war is described as organized and ritualized, which implies that the use of violence became a norm in society, rather than the exception. The narratives on the phenomenon “war violence” produce and reproduce the image of human suffering and slaughter. Those subjected to violence are portrayed in a de-humanized fashion and branded as suitable to be exposed to it. In these stories, morally correct actions are constructed as a contrast to the narratives on war violence. In these descriptions, the perpetrator is depicted as a dangerous, evil, and ideal enemy. He is portrayed as a real and powerful yet alien criminal who is said to pose a clear threat to the social order existing before the war.

  • 38.
    Basic, Goran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Definicije počinitelja ratnog nasilja i žrtve. Analitički model za analizu rituala ratnog nasilja u koncentracionim logorima tokom rata u Bosni i Hercegovini: Definitions of the perpetrator of war violence and the victim. Analytical model for analysis concerning rituals of war violence in concentration camp during the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina2017In: ”Ambassadors of Peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina” : The Second International Scientific Conference of Victimology in Bosnia and Herzegovina: "Ambasadori mira u Bosni i Hercegovini“ : Druga međunarodna naučna viktimološka konferencija u Bosni i Hercegovini, Sarajevo: University of Sarajevo , 2017, p. 16-21Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents a theoretical and methodological model for analyzing the experiences retold by former concentration camp detainees who were placed in concentration camps as civilians at the beginning of the Bosnian war in the 1990s. The aim is to analyze the recounted rituals of war violence in concentration camp as well as identifying how the perpetrators of war violence and victims are symbolically defined in stories. In these descriptions, the perpetrator is defined as a dangerous, evil, and ideal enemy. He is portrayed as a real and powerful yet alien criminal. When informants emphasize extermination and the systematization of war violence in the camps during the war, they produce and reproduce the image of war violence that is organized and conducted on a daily basis. The aim of this verbal emphasis seems to be that the described acts of war violence in the camps, after the war obtain the status of an organized and ritualized war violence. By defining the perpetrators of war violence, the interviewed in the study implicitly point out the complementary opposition of the perpetrator - a victim of violence. The victim is presented as pre-war acquaintances, friends and neighbors of the perpetrators of violence. Victim of violence is defined as tired, dying in agony, inferior, de-humanized, stamped and helplessly left to the mercy of the perpetrators of war violence.

  • 39.
    Basic, Goran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy.
    Definitioner av våld i överlevandes berättelser efter kriget i Bosnien2015In: Sociologisk forskning, ISSN 0038-0342, Vol. 52, no 4, p. 341-361Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research on violence during the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina presents a one-sided picture of the phenomenon ”war violence.” Researchers have emphasized the importance of narratives but they have not focused on stories about war violence, nor have they analyzed the stories of war violence being a product of interpersonal interaction. This article tries to fill this knowledge gap by analyzing the narratives told by survivors of the war in northwestern Bosnia in the 1990s. The aim is to analyze how the survivors describe violence during the war, and also to analyze those discursive patterns that contribute in constructing the category ”war violence.” The construction of the category ”war violence” is made visible in the empirical material when the interviewees talk about (1) a new social order in the society, (2) human suffering, (3) sexual violence, and (4) human slaughter. All interviewees define war violence as morally reprehensible. In narratives on the phenomena ”war violence” a picture emerges which shows a disruption of the social order existing in the pre-war society. The violence practiced during the war is portrayed as organized and ritualized and this creates a picture that the violence practice became a norm in the society, rather than the exception. Narratives retelling violent situations, perpetrators of violence and subjected to violence do not only exist as a mental construction. The stories live their lives after the war, and thus have real consequences for individuals and society.

  • 40.
    Basic, Goran
    Lund University.
    Definitions of Violence: Narratives of Survivors from the War in Bosnia and Herzegovina2018In: Journal of Interpersonal Violence, ISSN 0886-2605, E-ISSN 1552-6518, Vol. 33, no 13, p. 2073-2097Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research on violence during the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina has resulted in a one-sided presentation of the phenomenon of “war violence.” Researchers have emphasized the importance of narratives in general but have not analyzed stories on war violence that were the product of interpersonal interaction and meaning-making activity. The aim of this article is to fill this knowledge gap by analyzing survivor narratives of the 1990s war in northwestern Bosnia. The focus is on analyzing interviewees’ descriptions of wartime violence and the discursive patterns that contribute to constructing the phenomenon of “war violence.” My analysis reveals an intimate relationship between how an interviewee interprets the biographical consequences of war violence and the individual’s own war experiences. All interviewees described war violence as something that is morally reprehensible. These narratives, from both perpetrators of violence and those subjected to violence, recount violent situations that not only exist as mental constructions but also live on even after the war; thus, they have real consequences for the individuals and their society.

  • 41.
    Basic, Goran
    Lund University.
    Definitions of War Violence and Genocide: Narratives of Survivors from the War in Bosnia and Herzegovina2015In: After Communism. East and West Under Scrutiny. Book of Abstracts of the Fifth International Conference, Craiova, Romania, April 24-25 / [ed] Anca Parmena Olimid; Cătălina Maria Georgescu, Craiova, Romania, 2015, p. 72-73Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is analyzing the narratives of survivors of thewar in northwestern Bosnia in the 1990s. The focus lies on analyzing interviewees’ description of war-time violence and also analyzingdiscursive patterns that contribute in constructing the phenomenon“war violence”. Analysis shows that the interpersonal interactions thatcaused the violence continue even after the violent situation is over.Recollections from perpetrators and those subjected to violence of thewar do not exist only as verbal constructions in Bosnia of today.Stories about violent situations live their own lives after the war andcontinue being important to individuals and social life. The crimescommitted in northwestern Bosnia are qualified as genocide accordingto indictments against former Serbian leaders Radovan Karadžić andRatko Mladić. All interviewees in this study experienced and survivedthe war in northwestern Bosnia. These individuals have a present,ongoing relation with these communities: Some live therepermanently, and some spend their summers in northwestern Bosnia.Institutions in the administrative entity Republika Srpska (to whichnorthwestern Bosnia now belong administratively) deny genocide,and this approach to war-time events becomes a central theme infuture, post-war analysis of the phenomena “war violence”, and“reconciliation”. Therefore, it is very important to analyze the politicalelite’s denial of the systematic acts of violence during the war thathave been conveyed by the Hague Tribunal, the Court of Bosnia andHerzegovina onWar Crime, and Bosnian media. The narratives in myempirical material seem to be influenced by (or coherent with) therhetoric mediated in these fora. When informants emphasizeextermination and the systematization of violence during the war, theyproduce and reproduce the image of a mutual struggle on a collectivelevel. The aim of this struggle seems to be that the described acts ofviolence be recognized as genocide.

  • 42.
    Basic, Goran
    Lund University.
    Definitions of War Violence and Reconciliation in Narratives of Survivors from the War in Bosnia and Herzegovina: Definicije ratnog nasilja i pomirenje u pričama preživjelih poslije rata u Bosni i Hercegovini2015In: Ambassadors of Peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina. First International Scientific and Professional Conference of Victimology in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Hercegovina, March 3-4, 2015 / [ed] Adžajlić, Azra, International Peace Research Association – IPRA, Bihać University, Sakarya University och Institute of Knowledge Management Skopje , 2015, p. 17-28Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research on violence during the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina have emphasized the importance of narratives without focusing on narratives mentioning war violence, but they have not analyzed stories on war violence that were the product of interpersonal interaction and meaning-making activity. The aim of this study is to fill this knowledge gap by analyzing the narratives of survivors of the war in northwestern Bosnia in the 1990s. The focus lies on analyzing interviewees’ description of war-time violence and also analyzing discursive patterns that contribute in constructing the phenomenon “war violence”. Analysis shows that the interpersonal interactions that caused the violence continue even after the violent situation is over. Recollections from perpetrators and those subjected to violence of the war do not exist only as verbal constructions in Bosnia of today. Stories about violent situations live their own lives after the war and continue being important to individuals and social life. Individuals who were expelled from northwestern Bosnia during the war in the 1990s are, in a legal sense, in a recognized violence-afflicted victim category. Several perpetrators were sentenced by the Hague Tribunal and the Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina on War Crime. The crimes committed in northwestern Bosnia are qualified as genocide according to indictments against former Serbian leaders Radovan Karadžić and Ratko Mladić. All interviewees in this study experienced and survived the war in northwestern Bosnia. These individuals have a present, ongoing relation with these communities: Some live there permanently, and some spend their summers in northwestern Bosnia. Institutions in the administrative entity Republika Srpska (to which northwestern Bosnia now belong administratively) deny genocide, and this approach to war-time events becomes a central theme in future, post-war analysis of the phenomena “war violence”, and “reconciliation”. Therefore, it is very important to analyze the political elite’s denial of the systematic acts of violence during the war that have been conveyed by the Hague Tribunal, the Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina on War Crime, and Bosnian media. The narratives in my empirical material seem to be influenced by (or coherent with) the rhetoric mediated in these fora. When informants emphasize extermination and the systematization of violence during the war, they produce and reproduce the image of a mutual struggle on a collective level. The aim of this struggle seems to be that the described acts of violence be recognized as genocide.

  • 43.
    Basic, Goran
    Lund University.
    Definitions of War Violence and Reconciliation in Narratives of Survivors from the War in Bosnia and Herzegovina: Definicije ratnog nasilja i pomirenje u pričama preživjelih poslije rata u Bosni i Hercegovini2015In: Ambassadors of Peace in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Abstract book, First International Scientific and Professional Conference of Victimology in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Sarajevo, Bosnia and Hercegovina, March 3-4, 2015. / [ed] Repovac, Hidajet; Sofradžija, Halima; Dimitrovski, Robert and Kenar, Nesrin, 2015, p. 9-9Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research on violence during the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina have emphasized the importance of narratives without focusing on narratives mentioning war violence, but they have not analyzed stories on war violence that were the product of interpersonal interaction and meaning-making activity. The aim of this study is to fill this knowledge gap by analyzing the narratives of survivors of the war in northwestern Bosnia in the 1990s. The focus lies on analyzing interviewees’ description of war-time violence and also analyzing discursive patterns that contribute in constructing the phenomenon “war violence”. Analysis shows that the interpersonal interactions that caused the violence continue even after the violent situation is over. Recollections from perpetrators and those subjected to violence of the war do not exist only as verbal constructions in Bosnia of today. Stories about violent situations live their own lives after the war and continue being important to individuals and social life. Individuals who were expelled from northwestern Bosnia during the war in the 1990s are, in a legal sense, in a recognized violence-afflicted victim category. Several perpetrators were sentenced by the Hague Tribunal and the Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina on War Crime. The crimes committed in northwestern Bosnia are qualified as genocide according to indictments against former Serbian leaders Radovan Karadžić and Ratko Mladić. All interviewees in this study experienced and survived the war in northwestern Bosnia. These individuals have a present, ongoing relation with these communities: Some live there permanently, and some spend their summers in northwestern Bosnia. Institutions in the administrative entity Republika Srpska (to which northwestern Bosnia now belong administratively) deny genocide, and this approach to war-time events becomes a central theme in future, post-war analysis of the phenomena “war violence”, and “reconciliation”. Therefore, it is very important to analyze the political elite’s denial of the systematic acts of violence during the war that have been conveyed by the Hague Tribunal, the Court of Bosnia and Herzegovina on War Crime, and Bosnian media. The narratives in my empirical material seem to be influenced by (or coherent with) the rhetoric mediated in these fora. When informants emphasize extermination and the systematization of violence during the war, they produce and reproduce the image of a mutual struggle on a collective level. The aim of this struggle seems to be that the described acts of violence be recognized as genocide. 

  • 44.
    Basic, Goran
    Lund University.
    Detecting Triads in a Swedish Juvenile Care Project2011In: Social Relations in Turbulent Times. Abstract book. 10th Conference of the European Sociological Association, Geneva, Switzerland, September 7-10, 2011, 2011, p. 441-441Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a study of a project concerning Swedish juvenile care professionals, youngsters and parents were studied by ethnographic field observations as well as interviewed. During the course of the investigation various and shifting triads forming conflicts as well as alliances were observed. In this paper the triads described in interviews will be compared to field observations of triads formed during various meetings connected to the juvenile care project. I will analyze similarities and differences in retold triads during interviews and interactional “in situ” formed triads according to (1) different alliance formations, (2) different roles in changing constellations, (3) the temporal development of the alliances in the triad and (4) the alliance’s including and excluding function in the triads.

  • 45.
    Basic, Goran
    Lund University.
    Different Categories of Victims and Competition for Victimhood in the Stories after the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina2014In: Victims' protection: International law, national legislations and practice. Book of abstracts. Fifth Annual Conference of the Victimology Society of Serbia, Belgrade, Serbia, November 27-28, 2014, 2014, p. 15-15Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    My goal with this article is to analyse the retold experiences of 27 survivors of the 1990s war in north-western Bosnia. I focus on describing the informants' portrayal of “victimhood” as a social phenomenon as well as analysing those discursive patterns which contributed in constructing the category “victim” and ”perpetrator”. When, after the war, different actors claim this “victim” status, it sparks a competition for victimhood. All informants are eager to present themselves as victims while at the same time the other categories' victim status is downplayed. Different categories appear and they are: ”the remainders” those who lived in north-western Bosnia before, during and after the war; “the fugitives” those who driven into north-western Bosnia during the war; “the returnees” those who returned after the war and “the diaspora” those who were driven out from north-western Bosnia and remained in their new country. The competition between these categories seems to take place on a symbolic level. All interviewees want to portray themselves as ”ideal victims” but they are all about to lose that status. The returnees and the diaspora are losing status by receiving recognition from the surrounding community and because they have a higher economic status, the remainders are losing status since they are constantly being haunted by war events and the refugees are losing status by being presented as strangers and thus fitting the role of ideal perpetrators. In this reproduction of competition for the victim role, all demarcations that were played out so successfully during the war live on.

  • 46.
    Basic, Goran
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of pedagogy. Lund University.
    Društvo i anomija. Sociološka analiza obavještajnog i operativnog policijskog rada i rada granične službe u oblasti Baltičkog mora (Society and anomie. Sociological analysis of intelligence and operational police and border guard work in the Baltic Sea area)2017In: ZBORNIK RADOVA ANOMIJA DRUŠTVA I POSLJEDICE / [ed] Macanović Nebojša, Petrović, Jagoda and Jovanić Goran, Banja Luka, Bosnia and Herzegovina: CENTAR MODERNIH ZNANJA , 2017, p. 31-40, article id DOI: 10.7251/DDADP1702031BConference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Resolution of the prevailing norms in a society in the context of war, occupation, anarchy,and takeover by criminal forces dispels the old norms but also sets new norms, which in turn can bequickly dispelled. Anomie can be understood as the core of society, as a kind of “pulsating moral destructiveness” that no one really can control but that paradoxically produces social order. Anomie does not arise from nothing, from the void; it is the product of the interactive dynamics that arise when individuals come together, acting as a propellant to lead individuals to meet. Émile Durkheim’s attention goes to how interpersonal interaction is creating changes in society, often showing thevarious pathological features that can lead to frustration and conflict. The individual’s quest toliberate himself from the collective as a result has a rootlessness and isolation. When the old network dissolves, it becomes impossible to maintain the old norms and values. The individual is no longer limited by the rules of morality and authority. Instead, the individual may develop a pattern of constantly exceeding all limits because the collapse of the former social control coincides with the development of the system that requires constant growth of individual needs. The product of such interactions is a state of society where there is uncertainty about the values, goals, and norms. Durkheim refers to this state as “anomie”. Durkheim analyzes deviation from the norm (as well as individual and societal response/reaction to the norm deviation, such as punishment) as an integral part of the issue of solidarity and social cohesion. The moral order in a society has a fundamental value according to Durkheim because individuals are both integrated with and controlled by the community. Durkheim saw integration as a way to tie the individual to the community through shared attitude, solidarity, and rituals. He saw control as a compelling force that binds the individual to the norms through the judicial system, laws, and sanctions. Durkheim defines a deviation from the normas an act that offends a strong and definite collective consciousness. Thus, the acts are antisocial inthat they violate norms and values that are important to the social unity. The work of intelligence and operational police and border guards in the Baltic Sea area (Sweden, Finland, Estonia, Lithuania, and Latvia) is characterized by the norm-creating and re-creating rituals from the first moments of theday: from the morning coffee and the first information exchange with an intelligence partner to operational actions in the form of surveillance or control of individuals and/or cars. These interactions are characterized by a strong desire to preserve the prevailing social order. In relation tothe threat to the prevailing norms, there also are normative rituals. For example, in these interactions,“norm-dissolving Russians” are constructed who are not physically present in the situation but whoare important in the relationship as invisible sacred objects. The making of the category “norm-dissolving Russian” in which Russia/Russians are used to dramatize the "other" is made visible in the empirical material when actors in the study describe (1) criminal Russians, (2) Russian espionage, and (3) Russian military invasion.

  • 47.
    Basic, Goran
    Lund University.
    Ekstremni slučaj krize: Definicije ratnog nasilja u pričama preživjelih poslije rata u Bosni i Hercegovini: Extreme Case of Crisis: Definitions of War Violence in Narratives of Survivors from the War in Bosnia and Herzegovina2015In: Crisis Management Days. 8th International Scientific Conference. University of Applied Sciences Velika Gorica, Velika Gorica, Croatia (20150514-20150515), University of Applied Sciences Velika Gorica, Velika Gorica, Croatia , 2015, p. 104-104Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [hr]

    Polazna točka ovog članka je rat koji je održan u sjeverozapadnoj Bosni i Hercegovini te posebno interpersonalna interpretacija nasilja i biografski utjecaj ratnog nasilja. Srpski vojnici i policajci ciljano su vršili nasilje nad civilnoim stanovništvom u sjeverozapadnoj Bosni. U svojoj namjeri da se Bošnjaci i Hrvati istjeraju s tog područja, srpski vojnici i policajci koristili su masovne egzekucije, tjeranje na bijeg, sustavno silovanje i koncentracione logore. Cilj ovog članka je popuniti ovu prazninu znanja kroz analizu priča preživjelih u ratu u sjeverozapadnoj Bosni tijekom 1990-ih. Svrha je analizirati kako preživjeli opisuju ratna nasilja te diskurzivne obrasce koji se pojavljuju u konstrukciji kategorije “ratnog nasilja.” Moja pitanja su kako slijedi: Kako ispitanici opisuju ratna nasilja? Koje kategorije nasilja su istaknute u pričama? Kako preživjeli opisuju seksualno nasilje i oblike seksualnog zlostavljanja tijekom rata? U ovoj studiji, želim dotaći fenomen “ratnog nasilja” kroz analizu priča ispitanika, odnosno njihove opise te odnose među njima. Ova analiza će pokazati da je interpretacija biografskih posljedica ratnog nasilja blisko povezana s osobnim ratnim iskustvima ispitanika. U nastavku ću pokušati istaći kako stvaranje koncepta “ratnog nasilja” postaje vidljivo kad sugovornici u empirijskom materijalu govore o (1) novom društvenom poretku, (2) ljudskoj patnji, (3) seksualnom nasilju i (4) ubijanju ljudi.

  • 48.
    Basic, Goran
    Lund University.
    Engagerad fixare eller ytterligare en person som ”bara pratar”?: Mödrars röster om samordnare i ungdomsvården2009Report (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to analyze how mothers with children placed in Swedish juvenile homes interpret, define and perceive, on the one hand, the project “Motverka Våld och Gäng” meaning “Counteract Violence and Gangs”, and on the other hand the role of the Coordinators employed in this project. The mothers who were interviewed spoke about some Coordinators that they appreciated. They then paint different pictures of appreciated Coordinators. These includes Coordinators who possess the power to, for example, “check out the Social Service” and Coordinators without power who never-the-less are appreciated. The Coordinators who are described in a positive way are also seen as actors that are dedicated. They often call the mothers, they fight for their children and succeed in making absent fathers more committed. The mothers whose stories contain criticism towards the Coordinators often criticize the other involved actors. The criticism itself isn’t only focused on the Coordinator but rather on the context in which the Coordinator is a part. When the Coordinator is criticized explicitly, the description partly projects the picture of the Coordinator as absent from the care-giving chain.

  • 49.
    Basic, Goran
    Lund University.
    Ethnic monitoring and social control: Descriptions from juveniles in juvenile care institutions2014In: Ett inkluderande samhälle? En inkluderande sociologi? Sociologidagarna 2014, Göteborg, March 13-15, 2014, 2014, p. 6-6Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has emphasized the institutional racism in total institutions. Researchers have highlighted the importance of narratives but have not focused on narratives about ethnic monitoring and social control. This article tries to fill this gap by analysing stories related to descriptions of ethnic monitoring and social control as told by juveniles of non-Swedish ethnicity in Swedish juvenile care institutions. A juvenile’s ethnicity was highlighted by drawing attention to the staff’s monitoring and social control. Interviews elucidated the victimhood that non-Swedish juveniles portrayed in relation to the staff and/or Swedish juveniles. When juveniles of non-Swedish ethnicity described ethnic monitoring and social control, they generally distanced themselves from staff behaviour and portrayed a victim identity. In constructing their identity, juveniles sometimes used their ethnic background rhetorically when describing everyday situations in the institution. The juveniles portrayed a humiliated self through dissociation from the staff and through the descriptions that they were treated differently than Swedish juveniles.

  • 50.
    Basic, Goran
    Lund University.
    Ethnic monitoring and social control: Descriptions from juveniles in juvenile care institutions2015In: Nordic Social Work Research, ISSN 2156-857X, E-ISSN 2156-8588, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 20-34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous research has emphasized the institutional racism in total institutions. Researchers have highlighted the importance of narratives but have not focused on narratives about ethnic monitoring and social control. This article tries to fill this gap by analysing stories related to descriptions of ethnic monitoring and social control as told by juveniles of non-Swedish ethnicity in Swedish juvenile care institutions. A juvenile’s ethnicity was highlighted by drawing attention to the staff’s monitoring and social control. Interviews elucidated the victimhood that non-Swedish juveniles portrayed in relation to the staff and/or Swedish juveniles. When juveniles of non-Swedish ethnicity described ethnic monitoring and social control, they generally distanced themselves from staff behaviour and portrayed a victim identity. In constructing their identity, juveniles sometimes used their ethnic background rhetorically when describing everyday situations in the institution. The juveniles portrayed a humiliated self through dissociation from the staff and through the descriptions that they were treated differently than Swedish juveniles.

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