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  • 1.
    Arjmand, Reza
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education and Teacher's Practice.
    Mirsafa, Masoumeh
    United Nations Habitat, Tehran, Iran.
    Ephemeral space sanctification and trespassing gender boundaries in a Muslim city2018In: Storia urbana, ISSN 0391-2248, E-ISSN 1972-5523, Vol. 161, p. 71-93Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A distinct feature of Muslim cities is demarcated separation between zones of public economic and private domestic activities. Such spatial distinction has been the organic extension of a social structure with limited presence of women in public zones. However, separation of spaces in the Muslim city and the way it is utilized, shaped and reproduced by men and women is not a simple case of dividing public-­private geographies and assigning them to males and females, respectively, and has been subject to appropriations and adaptations. The Shiite traditional Muharram procession is one of the instances of such appropriation which produces a semi-­private or tertiary (social and spatial) realm, where gendered behaviours are more fluid, the loyalties of the kin stretch beyond the dominant normative, and both men and women move with greater ease. Such spatial fluidity exacerbated during the rituals of Muharram, where presence of women in public space is promoted and invigorated. Among other means, the ephemeral space sanctification is utilized to create a space where the social sanctions are temporarily lifted, and gender spatial boundaries are suspended. As an ethnographical piece of research using methods informed by urban planning and urban sociology and based on a cross-­disciplinary study of gendered spatial divisions (socially and architecturally), this article endeavours to investigate the notion of ephemeral space sanctification in a Muslim city among the Guilani population in Lahijan, in northern Iran.

  • 2.
    Bauhn, Per
    University of Kalmar, School of Human Sciences.
    Normative multiculturalism, communal goods, and individual rights1995In: Multiculturalism and nationhood in Canada: the cases of First Nations and Quebec, Lund: Lund University Press , 1995, 1, p. 85-100Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 3.
    Bulandr, Karl-Henrik
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Ludvigsson, Kim
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Trygghet och samverkan i en av Sveriges mest trygga städer: En kvalitativ fallstudie om staden där nästan alla känner sig trygga.2014Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    We have in this field study been researching how social comfort is affected by the work of social services and their collaboration with police, schools and health care within a small village located countryside in the northern part of Sweden. The attribute which sets this village a part from most other small countryside villages is the fact that the crime rate is amongst the lowest in Sweden as well as the social security feeling within the inhabitants are amongst the highest. We traveled 2298 kilometers back and forth to be able to interview professionals and gather empiric material for this study. The method we have used for data collection has been in the form of semi structured interviews. We have used previous research concerning collaboration, social comfort, social discomfort and fear of crime as our aid to analyze our findings with the help of theories regarding different types of communites (gemeinschaft and gesellschaft) invented by Ferdinand Tönnies (2001) and Human Service Organisation by Hasenfeld (1983). We have analyzed our findings with the help of a qualitative content analysis. The result showed that the collaboration between the different authorities was a key point in preserving the social comfort feeling within the community and the idea of gemeinschaft also affects the outcome in various ways. The study will provide insight in understanding how collaboration can be represented in multi professional practices in the work for social comfort for the inhabitants as well as spreading knowledge regarding positive and negative effects concerning multi professional collaboration. Nyckelord / Key words: Samverkan, samarbete, trygghet, brott, brottslighet, crime, criminality and collaboration

  • 4.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    固定的疆界, 流动的地景 : 19世纪20年代英国对东孟加拉北部的扩张: [ Fixed Boundaries, Fluid Landscapes : British expansions into Northern East Bengal in the 1820s ]2017In: 环喜马拉雅区域研究编译文集二: 佐米亚、边疆与跨界 / [ed] Dan Smyer Yu, Su Faxiang, Li Yunxia, Beijing: Academy Press , 2017, p. 134-162Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Das Gupta, SanjuktaSapienza University of Rome, Italy.
    Subjects, Citizens and Law: Colonial and independent India2017Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This volume investigates how, where and when subjects and citizens come into being, assert themselves and exercise subjecthood or citizenship in the formation of modern India. It argues for the importance of understanding legal practice – how rights are performed in dispute and negotiation – from the parliament and courts to street corners and field sites. The essays in the book explore themes such as land law and rights, court procedure, freedom of speech, sex workers’ mobilisation, refugee status, adivasi people and non-state actors, and bring together studies from across north India, spanning from early colonial to contemporary times.

    Representing scholarship in history, anthropology and political science that draws on wide-ranging field and archival research, the volume will immensely benefit scholars, students and researchers of development, history, political science, sociology, anthropology, law and public policy.

  • 6.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Rangarajan, MaheshAshoka University, India ; University of Delhi, India.
    Nature, Knowledge, and Power in India2009Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Sivaramakrishnan, KalyanakrishnanUniversity of Washington, USA.
    Ecological Nationalisms: Nature, Livelihoods, and Identities in South Asia2012Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The works presented in this collection take environmental scholarship in South Asia into novel territory by exploring how questions of national identity become entangled with environmental concerns in Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakistan, and India. The essays provide insight into the motivations of colonial and national governments in controlling or managing nature, and bring into fresh perspective the different kinds of regional political conflicts that invoke nationalist sentiment through claims on nature. In doing all this, the volume also offers new ways to think about nationalism and, more specifically, nationalism in South Asia from the vantage point of interdisciplinary environmental studies. The contributors to this innovative volume show that manifestations of nationalism have long and complex histories in South Asia. Terrestrial entities, imagined in terms of dense ecological networks of relationships, have often been the space or reference point for national aspirations, as shared memories of Mother Nature or appropriated economic, political, and religious geographies. In recent times, different groups in South Asia have claimed and appropriated ancient landscapes and territories for the purpose of locating and justifying a specific and utopian version of nation by linking its origin to their nature-mediated attachments to these landscapes. The topics covered include forests, agriculture, marine fisheries, parks, sacred landscapes, property rights, trade, and economic development. Gunnel Cederlof is associate professor of history, Uppsala University, Sweden. K. Sivaramakrishnan is professor of anthropology and international studies and director of the South Asia Center, Jackson School of International Studies, at the University of Washington. The other contributors are Nina Bhatt, Vinita Damodaran, Claude A. Garcia, Urs Geiser, Goetz Hoeppe, Bengt G. Karlsson, Antje Linkenbach, Wolfgang Mey, Kathleen D. Morrison, J. P. Pascal, and Sarah Southwold-Llewellyn.

  • 8.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. Uppsala universitet.
    Sivaramakrishnan, KalyanakrishnanYale University, USA.
    Ecological Nationalisms: Nature, Livelihoods, and Identities in South Asia2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The works presented in this collection take environmental scholarship in South Asia into novel territory by exploring how questions of national identity become entangled with environmental concerns in Bangladesh, Nepal, Pakistan, and India. The essays provide insight into the motivations of colonial and national governments in controlling or managing nature, and bring into fresh perspective the different kinds of regional political conflicts that invoke nationalist sentiment through claims on nature. In doing all this, the volume also offers new ways to think about nationalism and, more specifically, nationalism in South Asia from the vantage point of interdisciplinary environmental studies. The contributors to this innovative volume show that manifestations of nationalism have long and complex histories in South Asia. Terrestrial entities, imagined in terms of dense ecological networks of relationships, have often been the space or reference point for national aspirations, as shared memories of Mother Nature or appropriated economic, political, and religious geographies. In recent times, different groups in South Asia have claimed and appropriated ancient landscapes and territories for the purpose of locating and justifying a specific and utopian version of nation by linking its origin to their nature-mediated attachments to these landscapes. The topics covered include forests, agriculture, marine fisheries, parks, sacred landscapes, property rights, trade, and economic development. Gunnel Cederlof is associate professor of history, Uppsala University, Sweden. K. Sivaramakrishnan is professor of anthropology and international studies and director of the South Asia Center, Jackson School of International Studies, at the University of Washington. The other contributors are Nina Bhatt, Vinita Damodaran, Claude A. Garcia, Urs Geiser, Goetz Hoeppe, Bengt G. Karlsson, Antje Linkenbach, Wolfgang Mey, Kathleen D. Morrison, J. P. Pascal, and Sarah Southwold-Llewellyn.

  • 9.
    Colomer, Laia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Feeling like at home in airports: experiences, memories and affects of placeness among Third Culture Kids2018In: Applied Mobilities, ISSN 2380-0127, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When analysed as network places for the mobility of subjects and objects, many descriptions refer to airports as placeless and meaningless spaces carrying no singular identity to themselves and to their users. This imagery does not necessarily fit with those people whose experiences are intrinsically linked to mobility as a recurrent early life style and as a part of their subjective identity. Drawing on affect theory this paper portrays an alternative picture of airports as meaningful places through the narratives made by a particular community of onward/multiple migrants, adult “Third Culture Kids”, associated with the experiences and memories of transiting in airports. By doing it, this article aims to add another dimension to mobilities that regards people’s affections and experiences ascribed to places of mobility.

  • 10. Granbom, Ann-Charlotte
    Den ukjente siden av turistparadiset Ko Lanta i Thailand2009In: Kunnskap og Vennskap, no 2, p. 8-9Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [no]

    På kort har øya Ko Lanta utviklet seg til det stedet i Thailand med flest svensker. Etter tsunami katastrofen i desember 2004 har utviklingen gått fort og migrasjon til øya har blitt veldig populært av ulike grunner. Lokalsamfunnene og områdene som tidligere var bebodd av havnomader og fattige muslimske fiskere er nå i ferd med å bli fortrengt av skan- dinaver som bygger hus og hytter. Man kan ofte lese glade solskinns- historier om svensker som har brutt opp fra en trist hverdag til fordel for paradiset Ko Lanta – men hvordan opplever egentlig lokalbefolkningen denne utviklingen?

  • 11. Granbom, Ann-Charlotte
    Havsnomaderna Urak Lawoi "Att förlora sin båt är som att förlora sin hand"2008In: Ursprungsfolk i världen / [ed] Anna Klint, Stockholm: Föreningen Fjärde Världen , 2008, p. 14-19Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [sv]

    När européerna kom i kontakt med Sydost-Asien på 1500-talet möttes de av ett väl fungerande handelssystem som byggdes ut till Atlanten och Stilla havet. "Havsnomader" eller ”sjözigenare” spelade här en viktig roll, då de försåg resande med varor i viktiga hamnar mellan Indiska Oceanen och Sydkinesiska havet. De var inte själva köpmän eller grossister, utan försåg mellanhänderna med varor. Dessa "havsnomader" existerar fortfarande, men antalet som lever på enbart båtar minskar för varje år och bosättning i land vid kusten blir allt vanligare. Trots bofasthet vid kusten - ibland i flera generationer - tenderar de att bevara sin etniska identitet från andra kustnära folk.

  • 12.
    Granbom, Ann-Charlotte
    Lund University, Sweden.
    The second wave: the Urak Lawoi after the tsunami in Thailand2017Doctoral thesis, monograph (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    On 26 December 2004, the Urak Lawoi sea people were hit by a huge tsunami that overwhelmed all of Southeast Asia causing the deaths of more than 350,000 people across the region. If the tsunami was the disaster, the “first wave”, the relief efforts and the assistance that came with it became the “second wave”, due to the social and economic changes that followed. The Urak Lawoi have for centuries, resided on the Andaman Sea, off western Thailand. They have long lived on islands, that today are popular touristic destinations, such as Phuket, Phi Phi, and Ko Lanta Yai. Here, they have long shared resources that the ocean can offer for subsistence. Living next to the sea is central to their identity; here, they fish, gather at the shore, and perform ancestor-spirit worship. Although they are a minority in Thailand, they maintain a culture, language, and lifestyle apart from Thai society. In this dissertation I discuss how the post-tsunami reforms, relief efforts and outside attention have affected everyday life among the Urak Lawoi on the island of Ko Lanta Yai. The dissertation is based on 36 months of ethnographic fieldwork that stretches over a decade (2002-2013), before and after the tsunami. I have used video cameras to film, providing a deeper understanding of the empirical data collected. The monograph provides an empirical understanding of how global economic interests and transnational migration influence local communities. Examples from fieldwork are used to demonstrate how an indigenous people were deprived of their territory (which in this case includes the sea), and how this affected their religion but also hampered their self-sufficient economy as they became increasingly dependent on a solid monetary income. The analysis reveals how a response to a natural disaster can accelerate the integration of local people into the global economic arena under the conditions of tourism development. The rebuilding activities, new regulations, and social integration processes became catalysts for the local government to implement desired changes that suited tourism growth. The study demonstrates how development increased the inequalities of people’s living conditions and made people without land entitlements more vulnerable. Those who have access to land were the best at integrating with Thai society, but they were also the best at preserving their identity.Thus, I argue, a natural disaster can be used as a pretext for exploitation in favor of tourism development in the affected area, and speed up the process of change. I conclude that outsiders have a desire to create stereotypes of the Urak Lawoi, who only have the “right” to retain their identity as “sea people” if they adapt their traditions and culture to suit tourism development. Although vulnerable, the Urak Lawoi do not see themselves as victims but show strong agency and creativity to act within limitations in society.

  • 13. Granbom, Ann-Charlotte
    Turistindustriens brød og et urfolks død2008In: Antropress. Antropologistudentens Tisdsskrift, ISSN 1894-7468, Vol. 1, p. 6-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [no]

    Thailand har etterhvert utviklet seg til å bli mange skandinaveres turistparadis. Etter tsunamikatastrofen som rammet Sørøst-Asia andre juledag 2004 fikk vi høre at den beste måten å hjelpe den thailandske befolkningen på etter hendelsen var å vende tilbake dit som turister. Den voksende turismen i Thailand har ført med seg en økt økonomisk velstand på mange av øyene solhungrige turister har lagt sin elsk på. De samme øyene er også hjem for en urfolksbefolkning, Urak Lawoi, som opplever en helt annen side av turismeeventyret.

  • 14.
    Granbom, Ann-Charlotte
    Lund university, Sweden.
    Urak Lawoi: A Field Study of an Indigenous People in Thailand and their Problems with Rapid Tourism Development2005Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This research is about the indigenous people Urak Lawoi in Andaman Sea, outside the west coast of Thailand. The study shows what happens to them when they are being deprived of their territory and are being forced to abandon their culture, lifestyle and traditional economic subsistence. Urak Lawoi have until recently maintained culture, language and lifestyle apart from the rest of Thai society. During the last one and half decades, rapid tourism development, with large-scale hotels and bungalow resorts, have impacted and disrupted significantly on the nomadic lifestyles of the indigenous Urak Lawoi. They have been pushed away farther from the beaches and into unproductive parts. Powerful global forces linked to the world market economy result in situations that are not favorable for the local people Urak Lawoi and the ecosystems.

    The study shows how inferiority complex of an ethnic community increase under circumstances of social, political and economic pressure.

  • 15. Granbom, Lotta, Ann-Charlotte
    Urak Lawoi: Sea Nomads in Andaman Sea2007Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lotta Granbom, a mother of three from Sweden is on holiday in Thailand. It is her first trip there together with her daughter Ebba-Lotta. After some difficulty finding accommodation at the tourist resorts, they decide instead to search for Sea Nomads in the Andaman Sea. Lotta has heard of a nomadic group of people who live on the sea around Thailand, Burma, Malaysia, Singapore, Philippines and Indonesia. She is curious to find out more; why a people choose to live on their boats? How this does shape their culture and traditions? What is their origin? And why do so few people know of their existence? This first journey, and encounter with the Urak Lawoi Sea Nomads will change Lotta’s life. For years to come Lotta will passionately follow and document their way of life. They have maintained a culture, language and life style set apart from Thai society, but all this is now changing. Lotta’s base has been Ko Lanta Yai in Thailand. Lotta’s work will show that the Urak Lawoi Sea Nomads do not live in the “pristine paradise” anymore as she had read about and expected. During her visits she has lived in a primitive hut, right on the beach, together with her three daughters. Incredibly, the hut was not swept away by the tsunami that hit Southeast Asia on 26 December, 2004, however the luxury resort built on the same beach did not have the same luck. The Urak Lawoi Sea Nomads talk of two different changes for them: “first the tourist came to the island and then the tsunami”. This book is a field study of the Urak Lawoi, an indigenous people in Thailand, and the consequences for them with rapid tourist development.

  • 16.
    Gustafsson, Kristina
    Högskolan i Halmstad, sektionen för humaniora.
    Recension. Rosa den farliga färgen av Fanny Ambjörnsson2012In: RIG: Kulturhistorisk tidskrift, ISSN 0035-5267, E-ISSN 2002-3863, Vol. 95, no 4, p. 252-254Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 17.
    Holtorf, Cornelius
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Högberg, Anders
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Archaeology and the future: Managing nuclear waste as a living heritage2015In: Radioactive Waste Management and Constructing Memory for Future Generations: Proceedings of the International Conference and Debate, 15-17 September 2014, Verdun, France, OECD Publishing, 2015, p. 97-101Conference paper (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Archaeology is the study of the past and its remains in the present. It is relevant to the long-term preservation of records, knowledge and memory, e.g. regarding final repositories of nuclear waste, in two ways. Firstly, future archaeology may promise the recovery of lost information, knowledge and meaning of remains of the past. Secondly, present-day archaeology can offer lessons about how future societies will make sense of remains of the past.

    Archaeology is always situated in a larger social and cultural context and the information, knowledge and meaning it generates is necessarily of its own present. Archaeological knowledge reflects contemporary perceptions of past and future; these perceptions change over time. Indeed, we cannot assume that in the future there will be any archaeology at all. We think, therefore, that future societies will want, and need, to make their own decisions about sites associated with nuclear waste, based on their own perceptions of past and future. To facilitate this process in the long term we need to engage each present, keeping safe options open.

    In this text we elaborate on these issues from our perspective as archaeologists.

  • 18.
    Häggander, Linnea
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    Japanska utbytesstudenter: en netnografisk studie om deras sociala liv på ett svenskt universitet2018Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Globalization and social interaction between countries are two current topics in today’s research. A shown interest in exchange studies among students all over the world is one of the positive outcomes of globalization and the social interactions that comes with it. This essay examines how a group of Japanese exchange students studying at a university in Sweden experience their social meetings with the local Swedish students and fellow Japanese exchange students. A netnographic method was applied to interview the informants online, 12 synchronous interviews were thus carried out to better understand the experiences of the Japanese exchange students. To better understand the relations that occur between the informants and the Swedish students, and the relations that occur with fellow Japanese students, the theory of “the Established and the Outsiders” by Norbert Elias and John L. Scotson (2010) is applied. This theory examines the relationship that takes place between a group that is new and has a low sense of community, and a group that is established and has a high sense of community. This study shows that the Japanese exchange students have a positive attitude when it comes to getting to know Swedish students. The X-program and also the mix of local students and exchange students in classes contributes to create a social platform for the Japanese exchange students. This study also shows that the group of Japanese exchange students have a low sense of community within the group, the study examines different factors to discuss why that may be.

  • 19.
    Kraus, Anja
    Pädagogische Hochschule Ludwigsburg, Germany.
    Johannes Bilstein (Hrsg.) (2011) : Anthropologie und Pädagogik der Sinne: Opladen, Farmington Hills: Barbara Budrich, 317 S.2012In: Vierteljahresschrift für Wissenschaftliche Pädagogik, ISSN 0507-7230, Vol. 1, p. 147-148Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [de]

    Unter anthropologischer Perspektive interessiert das Thema Sinne und eine Pädagogik der Sinne vorrangig unter den Gesichtspunkten seiner Historizität sowie Kultur- und Diskursabhängigkeit. Anstatt natürlicher oder naturgegebener und so gesehen gültiger Sachverhalte werden eher kulturelle Praktiken in den Blick genommen. Anstelle von Definitionen wird auf Definitionsmacht und auf diverse Prozesse einer Bedeutungskonstitution abgehoben, die sich auch widersprechen können. Die Hervorbringung von Welt (und damit auch von Wissen und Bewusstseinsprozessen) wird nicht zuletzt an leiblich-sinnliche Prozesse und an Handeln gebunden, wobei angenommen wird, dass diese auf soziale und gesellschaftliche Bedingungen einwirken, von denen sie zugleich bestimmt werden.

  • 20.
    Lalander, Philip
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences. Socialpsykologi.
    Att ladda gatan: Skapandet av El Callejero Lifestyle2006In: Urbanitetens omvandlingar: Kultur och identitet i den postindustriella staden, Daidalos, Göteborg. , 2006, p. 22-Chapter in book (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 21.
    Lalander, Philip
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences. Socialpsykologi.
    Confidentiality on the Edge2006In: NAT Nordic Journal of Alcohol and Drugs, Vol. 18, no english supplement, p. 5-Article, review/survey (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Lalander, Philip
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences. Socialpsykologi.
    Review of Geir Moshuus' Young Immigrants of Heroin: An Ethnography of Oslo's Street-Worlds2006In: NAT Nordic Journal of Alcohol and Drugs, Vol. 18, no english supplement, p. 3-Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 23.
    Lalander, Philip
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences. Socialpsykologi.
    Swedish machine gamblers from an ethnographic perspective2006In: Journal of Gambling Issues, Vol. 18, no october, p. 18-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article presents an ethnographic analysis of the biggest money-maker in Swedish gambling, namely, the state-owned electronic gambling machines, called Jack Vegas machines. The focus is on (1) social dimensions of the game and (2) various gambler types that develop in the Jack Vegas environment. In the section about social dimensions, there is a discussion about social interaction between gamblers and between gamblers and staff/owners of restaurants with the machines. There is a kind of sociality in Jack Vegas environments, but also feelings of irritation and frustration among the players. The textdiscusses the gambling types developed by Sue Fisher and, to some degree, Robert Custer and relates them to the Swedish ethnographic findings. But the article develops new gambler types as well. The gambler types developed by previous researchers in academic and empirical contexts need to be revitalized and further developed in new gamingenvironments.

  • 24.
    Lund, Anna
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    From pregnancy out of place to pregnancy in place: Across, within and between landscapes of meaning2017In: Ethnography, ISSN 1466-1381, E-ISSN 1741-2714, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 76-87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Through his metaphor landscapes of meaning, Reed provides a way of looking at meaning in terms of how it explains action, with the assumption that action occurs within landscapes of meaning. However, my ethnographic evidence suggests that Reed’s metaphor needs to enlarge its scope. In doing this I use my research on immigrant girls in Sweden. The aim is to demonstrate that people can and do live across, within and between landscapes of meaning. This interstitiality can both produce extreme hardship and possibilities of freedom and agency. I share the story of one person, Nazira, who is negotiating with different social and cultural worlds. This allows her to criticize different cultural contexts and to work towards emergent cultural forms. I conclude by arguing that my ethnographical accounts could be used in support and as a critique of the theoretical understanding of landscapes of meaning within Reed’s interpretivist sociology.

  • 25.
    Münster, Ursula
    et al.
    Ludwig-Maximilian Universität, Germany.
    Satsuka, ShihoCederlöf, GunnelLinnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. Royal Institute of Technology;Uppsala University.
    Asian environment: connections across borders, landscapes, and times2014Collection (editor) (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Münster, Ursula
    et al.
    LMU Munich, Germany.
    Satsuka, Shiho
    University of Toronto, Canada.
    Cederlöf, Gunnel
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. Uppsala University ; Royal Institute of Technology KTH.
    Introduction2014In: RCC Perspectives, ISSN 2190-5088, no 3, p. 5-7Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Pemunta, Ngambouk Vitalis
    Central European University, Hungary.
    Health and cultural values: female circumcision within the context of HIV/AIDS in Cameroon2011 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This book provides a nuanced analysis of the transformations that the ritual cutting of Female Circumcision (FC) recently underwent within the changing medical and institutional context of the HIV/AIDS pandemic among Ejagham tribes in Southwest Cameroon.

    Based on local level ethnography, it captures the multivocale perspectives and agency of participants thereby putting to question the uncritical feminist stance that “Third World Women” lack agency and are chattel. As the highest rite of patriarchy, the quintessential icon of gendered personhood and femininity, FC remains salient even when it is no longer the criterion for membership into the Moninkim secret society especially within the new medical and institutional context of the HIV/AIDS pandemic because it is intertwined with the whole cultural political economy of the Ejaghams. The commercialization of this feminine institution charged with feminine personhood through its spectacular performances (enacting matrimonial relations) within and beyond the Ejagham locale is evidence of its continuous centrality in the life world of participants. By focusing on health alone, anti-HIV/AIDS and anti-FC interventions by both the state and civil society actors miss the point. FC is increasingly becoming a human, social, gender rights and development issue calling for a multi-pronged development approach. The threat of the HIV/AIDS pandemic led to ferocious intergenerational debates over moral values about female inordinate sexuality and to the double appropriation of the concept of human security. Conservatives maintain that FC tempers with women’s sexuality and is therefore a useful mechanism to keep women in matrimonial service, a moral check on inordinate sexuality and a ‘‘native’’ antidote against the scourge of the pandemic. Anti-FC advocates point to the bloodletting entailed by the ritual procedures as fuelling the spread of the pandemic through the spread of diseases with HIV/AIDS inclusive among participants. A third group of cultural insiders are rather opting but for the cautious appropriation of modernity while simultaneously maintaining tradition: medicalisation of the ritual procedures. By reducing the complexity and nuances of the ritual cutting to health alone, anti-FC activism has instead produced a backlash marked by simultaneous contestation and practice. Paradoxically, the anti-FC campaigns have resulted in the privatization of FC on increasingly younger girls. However, the recent waiving of the ritual cutting as a precondition for membership into the Moninkim cult-partly because of the ageing of the initial initiates, the health risk of the HIV/AIDS pandemic and anti-FC advocacy campaigns by local NGOs shows that change is underway. Simultaneously, inter-tribal marriages with members of non-circumcising tribes and romantic love relationships beyond the purview of the traditional patriarchal orbit have led younger lovers  increasingly seeking mutually satisfying love relationships for which  FC, a ‘virtuous cut’, becomes an obstacle.

    While internal socio-cultural change is imminent and needs to consolidated, Western positionality on ritual FC has instead stonewalled eradication initiatives usefully calling for the need to “wear native spectacles”: engage participants in meaningful dialogue and convert them into their own change agents, tailor health education and social change initiatives with and not against the target population. Local processes are rooted in wider fields of power and are affected by forces at various scales calling for the need to look at the entanglement between local and global, economic, social, political and historical processes in the study of, and in interventions to change health and other cultural issues.

  • 28.
    Pemunta, Ngambouk Vitalis
    Central European University, Hungary.
    Human rights and socio-legal resistance against female genital cutting: an anthropological perspective2011 (ed. 1)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Human rights-based interventions against genital cutting practices (FGC) have increasingly emphasised the need for legislation against such practices with little attention to the consequences. Accordingly,the international community has compelled state parties by linking international development aid to good governance and human rights- the rights of women and children- through the elimination of genital surgeries and other gender-based discriminatory practices by adopting appropriate legislation that will deter practitioners. This ethnographic study explores diverse local reactions among FGC practicing Ejagham ethnicities in Southwest Cameroon. It highlights the dilemmas inherent in an anti-genital cutting legislation. Drawing from the experiences of African countries that adopted anti- FGC legislation, it demonstrates that the ''bifurcated power structure” in the postcolonial Context and therefore multiple overlapping authority systems- between the national government and traditional village authority system - and the state's lack of '”statehardness” are some of the dilemmas compromising the adoption and implementation of an anti-FGC legislation in Cameroon.

  • 29.
    Porsfelt, Dan
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences. arbetsvetenskap/sociologi.
    After work - himmel eller helvete?: En debatt2007In: Spiritus: Skriftserie från Vin & Sprithistoriska muséet, ISSN 1404-465X, Vol. 9, p. 14-28Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Ramström, Caroline
    University of Kalmar, School of Communication and Design.
    Användning av IT-stöd hos mobila arbetare: Fallstudie av spridningsnättekniker hos Relacom2009Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 15 credits / 22,5 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 31.
    Trulsson, Åsa
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Liberating Movements: Sensing and Managing Emotions in the Dance of the Spider2014In: Journal of Ritual Studies, ISSN 0890-1112, Vol. 28, no 2, p. 51-64Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 32.
    Wellfelt, Emilie
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences. University of Cologne, France.
    Heritage in Alor: Sustaining Local Identity in a Globalized World2015In: Sites, Bodies and Stories: Imagining Indonesian History / [ed] Susan Legêne, Bambang Purwanto, Henk Schulte Nordholt, Singapore: NUS Press , 2015, p. 67-86Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Wellfelt, Emilie
    Växjö University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Humanities.
    Returning to Alor: retrospective documentation of the Cora Du Bois collection at the Museum of World Culture, Gothenburg, Sweden2009In: Indonesia and the Malay World, ISSN 1363-9811, E-ISSN 1469-8382, Vol. 37, no 108, p. 183-202Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Zhang, Chenyanqiu
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Design.
    Better Passing Waste: First Step to Cultivate Pro-environmental Behaviour for Chinese Individuals2019Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    With the economy developing in China, there is an intense struggle between industrial development and environmental sustainability where improving the individuals’ performance upon waste disposal is one of the crucial aspirations. The main concern for the Chinese government to address the phenomenon is to cultivate the individuals’ habits to classify domestic waste. Although this is a complicated field involved in long-term behaviour change, the author believes that small attempts can gradually affect the people and finally make a big difference. For a stronger impact in society, the Chinese Post-90sgenerationwas selected to be the pilots for this project outcome. To seek for the potential opportunities, the research was conducted to understanding how they view the phenomenon and what are their perceptions and expectations. Social-demographic factors, external factors, and internal factors of recycling and pro-environmental behaviour were all evaluated by the respondents for determining the most influencing factors for waste classification. Moreover, their response towards purchasing factors and preferred ideas helped target the top three among the six concept proposals generated from mind mapping. The opinions and feedback from the individuals and two recycling companies in China and Sweden instructed the concept selection. The final concept was outlined in a plan which is named “Restart” for further implementation. The “Restart” means to restart the waste’s life and restart people’s lifestyles, which will bring life into a new journey. The “Restart” Plan visualized how the social actors are involved and supervised by each other for the effort put into practice. This enables the surrounding actors to facilitate the individuals’journey for dispose of the waste, which in return connects the individuals more close to other actors for further development. Since the concept developed is a universal service, it can be adapted for all the generations.

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