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  • 1.
    Adeniji, Anna
    Södertörns högskola.
    Being and Becoming Mixed Race, Black, Swedish and a Nomadic Subject2013In: Afro-Nordic landscapes: Equality and Race in Northern Europe / [ed] Michael McEachrane, New York: Routledge, 2013Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Alinia, Minoo
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Eliassi, Barzoo
    Oxford University ; Lund university.
    Temporal and generational impact on identity, home(land) and politics of belonging among the Kurdish diaspora.2014In: Nordic Journal of Migration Research, ISSN 1799-649X, E-ISSN 1799-649X, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 73-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to examine the experiences of two generations among the Kurdish diaspora in Sweden: those who migrated as adults and those who were born and/or raised in Sweden. The focus will be on issues of identity, home(land) and politics of belonging with regard to generational and temporal aspects. We will argue that there are significant differences among the older and younger generations with regard to their experiences that demand different theoretical and analytical conceptualisations.

  • 3.
    Alinia, Minoo
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Wahlbeck, Östen
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Eliassi, Barzoo
    Oxford University ; Lund university.
    Khayati, Khalid
    Linköping University.
    The Kurdish Diaspora: Transnational Ties, Home, and Politics of Belonging2014In: Nordic Journal of Migration Research, ISSN 1799-649X, E-ISSN 1799-649X, Vol. 4, no 2, p. 53-56Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Avery, Helen
    Lund University.
    A Library and School Network in Sweden: Social Literacies and Popular Education2017In: Teacher and Librarian Partnerships in Literacy Education in the 21st Century / [ed] Joron Pihl, Kristin Skinstad van der Kooij, Tone Cecilie Carlsten, Rotterdam: Sense Publishers, 2017, p. 45-62Chapter in book (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The topic of this article is the Commons, an integrated school and public library network in an urban multi-ethnic neighbourhood in southern Sweden. In 2011, the Commons network was awarded a national prize as the best school library in Sweden for its outstanding collaboration with the teachers and its exemplary work in stimulating learning. The study explores ways this library – school partnership contributes to the development of literacy and democratic competencies, allowing children to become active members of their local community.

  • 5.
    Avery, Helen
    Jönköping University.
    At the bridging point: tutoring newly arrived students in Sweden2017In: International Journal of Inclusive Education, ISSN 1360-3116, E-ISSN 1464-5173, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 404-415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In Sweden, tutoring in the mother tongue is a special support measure primarily intended for newly arrived students to facilitate their transition into the Swedish school system. Tutoring is premised on the collaboration between the class teacher, responsible for subject-related expertise, and the tutor, who contributes with knowledge of the student’s mother tongue and previous context of studies. In this case study of class teachers’ and mother tongue tutors’ conditions for collaboration at a multi-ethnic primary school, six mother tongue tutors and six class teachers were asked about the purpose of their work, how it was organised, and what could be done to improve working conditions. Interviews with head teachers, and data on work organisation from observations, document study, and participation in meetings for a period of one and a half years supplemented the teacher interviews. The analysis focuses on whether tutors and teachers belong to the same or different Communities of Practice, based on shared concerns and opportunities for collaboration, as well as looking at the relative positioning of languages and teaching roles. Findings suggest that the degree of collaboration between tutors and teachers was not sufficient to allow tutoring to function in the way it is envisaged by national steering documents. Tutoring was instead based on the tutors’ own knowledge of the subjects they taught. Recruitment of suitable tutors was difficult. However, conditions for collaboration and more effective tutoring in the schools could be improved with relatively simple support structures at the level of the municipality.

  • 6.
    Avery, Helen
    Lund University.
    Study guidance in mathematics for newcomer pupils in Sweden: policy, language and subject teaching traditions2018In: Evascol - School, migration, itinerancy: complementary perspectives, 5-6 April 2018, Suresnes, France, 2018Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The presentation is based on a review of the litterature on newcomer education in Sweden, including a discussion of the most recent policy changes and observations on their effects. Specific impacts of policy concerning study guidance in mathematics are illustrated with examples from classroom observations and teacher interviews.

  • 7.
    Avery, Helen
    Jönköping University.
    Teaching in the 'edgelands' of the school day: The organisation of Mother Tongue Studies in a highly diverse Swedish primary school2015In: Power and Education, ISSN 1757-7438, E-ISSN 1757-7438, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 239-254Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To promote attainment and inclusion, Sweden offers tuition in migrant pupils’ mother tongues as a regular school subject. However, the formulation of learning aims is problematic, and resources allocated to the subject do not correspond to ambitions expressed in steering documents. This case study presents an analysis of the organization of Mother Tongue Studies at a highly diverse urban primary school, based on interviews with teachers and head teachers. The practical organization of Mother Tongue Tuition affects how mother tongue teachers and pupils are perceived, but also potentially provides opportunities for empowerment and educational development. Results indicate that in the investigated case, such opportunities are not exploited, placing mother tongue teachers in a state of continuous structural stress, while limiting the forms their teaching relationships can take. Additionally, scheduling the school subject Mother Tongue Studies at the ‘edgelands' of the school day contributed to further marginalizing languages taught as mother tongue and minimized interaction with class teachers.

  • 8.
    Avery, Helen
    Jönköping University.
    The role of the school library: Reflections from Sweden2014In: Intercultural Education, ISSN 1467-5986, E-ISSN 1469-8439, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 497-507Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Libraries are critical learning spaces and may play a significant role in intercultural education initiatives, particularly in Sweden where the national curriculum ascribes central functions to libraries for learning activities. Unfortunately, the ways in which teachers and librarians may collaborate to leverage mutual resources is not fully understood. This article uses Pirjo Lahdenperä’s model of intercultural education development to consider the case of a small school library in a highly diverse urban neighbourhood. Although public libraries in Scandinavia can support intercultural educational values by addressing individual needs and complementing curriculum-based teaching, the development of new teaching practices requires additional guidance as well as institutional support.

  • 9.
    Avery, Helen
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Barhoum, Rafah
    Lund University.
    Educational leadership in a state of protracted crisis: refugee education in Lebanon2018In: The Primary Colours of Education #3 «School Leadership Matters»: Conference Book : 16th & 17th April 2018 - Baška, Croatia, Zagreb: Network of Education Policy Centers , 2018, p. 20-21Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The presentation is based on a series of interviews with school leaders working with refugee children in Lebanon, both within the Lebanese schools and in various NGOs. Questions focused the social, pedagogical and economic dimensions of their work, as well as their strategies for organising training and functioning structures.

    In Lebanon, there are different groups of refugee and migrant pupils in need of education, at primary and secondary levels. These include Palestinians born in Lebanon, or recently arrived as refugees, Syrian refugees, refugees from other countries, and children of migrant workers. The residence and work status of their parents varies. The Syrian refugees constitute a very large group, but the exact numbers are uncertain.

    The uncertain and precarious situation of the refugees, lack of resources and poor living conditions are major dimensions of the work of school leaders in these contexts, both for those working within the Lebanese schools, and for those who have leadership functions within the NGOs.

  • 10.
    Avery, Helen
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Granstedt, Lena
    Umeå University.
    Making space for collaboration at school and preschool: the places mother tongue teachers meet teachers of other subjects2018In: Multilingualism and Education: Interdisciplinary and International Perspectives, 7 May 2018, Oslo, 2018, p. 36-37Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent changes in the Swedish Education Act aim at reducing time spent in reception classes, so that newly arrived pupils (at least partly) enter mainstream classes on arrival. A consequence is that educating newcomers has become the responsibility of all school staff. Expectations on the contribution of mother tongue teachers have increased, as well as presupposing extensive collaboration between bilingual support staff or mother tongue teachers and teachers of other school subjects.

    The presentation focuses on the social practices in schools concerning mother tongue teachers and their potential participation in school development and collaboration with other staff, paying particular attention to the places where meetings occur. Three mother tongue teachers were followed a total of 15 days in a period of six months, to observe the opportunities for collaboration and communication in their working days. Two of these teachers also worked with study guidance.

    Results suggest that among the significant aspects were: the place of interaction, the language, higher status of mother tongue at the school, a positive attitude in teachers involved, and interaction with an entire class and with other staff. Places of meeting were frequently corridors, the staff rooms, or other places that were not normally designated for regular teaching or planning activities. The places of interaction thus tended to underline the marginal position of the mother tongue teachers with respect to participation in school development.

  • 11.
    Avery, Helen
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Languages.
    Said, Salam
    Friedrich Ebert Stiftung, Tunis.
    Higher Education as a Socio-economic Advancement Opportunity for Refugees2017In: 33. Deutscher Orientalistentag "Asia, Africa and Europe" 18 – 22 september 2017, Jena, Tyskland, 2017Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This conceptual paper addresses the relationships between higher education policies for refugees and the wider issues of social justice, transition to sustainability, peacebuilding and post-conflict recovery in the Middle East. The paper draws on an overview of current options for refugees to access higher education, as well as research on long term impacts in post conflict contexts. Perspectives adopted in the paper involve theorizing the ways higher education shapes socio-technical systems in the Middle East, and the effects this can have for economic recovery and autonomy. Today, the world is facing the greatest refugee and displacement crisis since the Second World War. The immediate causes of the crisis seem to be armed conflicts and radicalisation of societies. At closer inspection, we can see that this crisis reflects a repeated failure of the international economic and political system in addressing certain major challenges, including social justice and adequate education. While international politics has failed to support stability or prevent political conflicts, growing neoliberalism and ineffective development strategies have instead contributed to social injustice and economic instability at national and international levels. Higher education plays a key role in stabilisation, modernization and de-radicalisation of societies, but has to date only received limited attention in development assistance strategies or in the context of humanitarian aid for refugees. Young refugees and displaced academics are therefore insufficiently equipped to work as catalysts for peacebuilding in their own or host countries. Moreover, they are under severe economic and social pressure to earn money for their family’s survival. Given these circumstances, opening up opportunities for higher education for young refugees (O'Keeffe and Pásztor 2017) not only give them the hope to improve their socioeconomic situation, but will also change their personal status as a “refugee”. Crucially, a well-educated generation is a fundamental condition for successful reconstruction, social recovery and sustainable development in the post conflict future (Emtairah et al. 2016). Attention must be devoted to the form and content of higher education, however, to address challenges, create capacity needed in recovery efforts, and avoid future dependencies (cf. Dryden-Peterson 2016).

  • 12.
    Avery, Helen
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Said, Salam
    Friedrich Ebert Stiftung, Tunis.
    Higher Education for Refugees: The Case of Syria2017In: Policy & Practice: A Development Education Review, ISSN 1748-135X, no 24, p. 104-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The refugee crisis is also a crisis in education.  While attention is frequently directed toward primary and secondary school levels, higher education is a strategic issue for refugees, both as individuals and for long term processes of post-conflict recovery and peacebuilding.  Education prospects and content are drivers of onwards migration, but also affect economic structures on return.  Higher education has the potential to support sustainable socio-economic development, but impacts will depend on which strategies are adopted and which types of capacity are prioritised.  The article examines the issue of access to higher education for Syrian refugees, describing the situation in Lebanon in particular.  Foreign interests can fuel sectarianism as well as creating economic structural dependencies.  Both existing and possible future options supported by the international community are considered here, and discussed with respect to how they might affect opportunities for democratic and autonomous societal developments.

  • 13.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    et al.
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Di Rosa, Mirko
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Chiatti, Carlos
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Melchiorre, Maria Gabriella
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Lamura, Giovanni
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Opportunities and challenges of migrant work in the Italian long-term care system2013In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 17, no Supplement, Juny/july, p. S133-S133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Italy is one of the most aged countries in the world, with a longstanding tradition of family care of the dependent elderly. Inrecent times, however, Italy has been witnessing in-depth social and cultural changes, which have been negatively impacting on informal care provision. In addition, the public long-term care (LTC) system highly relies on cash-for-care schemes for supporting older people, whereas “formal” care services are characterised by weak coverage and intensity. This situation has led to a remarkable increase in theprivate employment of migrant care workers (MCWs), whose number increased by four times in the last two decades.

    Method: An overview of MCWs phenomenon in Italy is provided through the analysis of empirical data retrieved by available official sources at national level, as well as by results from own surveys conducted in recent years on large samples of MCWs.

    Results: The following opportunities and challenges concerning MCWs’ employment in the LTC sector were identified: improve MCW’s capacity to deliver quality care; reduce therisk of elder abuse and neglect and of meeting MCWs’ own care needs; increase their social integration in destination countries and reduce “care drain” in sending countries; and how to improve stakeholders’ involvement for a better exchange of good practices and more effective policy measures.

    Conclusion: In these years, privately employed MCWs have contributed to change the traditional Italian “family care model” into a new “migrant-in-the-family care model”. However, the issue concerning the sustainability of this model within the Italian LTC system in the future is still open.

  • 14.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    et al.
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Di Rosa, Mirko
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Melchiorre, Maria Gabriella
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Lamura, Giovanni
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    The employment of migrant workers in Italy’s elder care: Opportunities and challenges2016In: Ageing in Contexts of Migration / [ed] Ute Karl, Sandra Torres, London: Routledge, 2016, p. 159-171Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 15.
    Boberg, Per
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Cultural Sciences.
    Immigration och integration i kommunpolitiken: En studie av immigranters representation avseende förtroendeuppdrag i Växjö Kommun 1971-19912010Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The present study discusses the political integration of immigrants in local government in the muncipality of Växjö from 1971 to 1991 in the form of representation. The main data source consists of lists of people holding local commissions of trust in the various boards and committés appointed by the municipality council, as well as in the council itself. These data are then compared to population statistics from Statistics Sweden. Main findings of the study are that immigrants are insufficiently represented in relation to their proportion of the population. It is suggested that this is a result of structural discrimination and possibly insufficient socialisation.

  • 16.
    Chiatti, Carlos
    et al.
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy ; Lund University.
    Di Rosa, Mirko
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Barbabella, Francesco
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Greco, Cosetta
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Melchiorre, Maria Gabriella
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Principi, Andrea
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Santini, Sara
    National Institute of Health and Science on Ageing (INRCA), Italy.
    Lamura, Giovanni
    Migrant care work for elderly households in Italy2013In: Ageing in the Mediterranean / [ed] Joseph Troisi, Hans-Joachim von Kondratowitz, Bristol: Policy Press, 2013, p. 235-256Chapter in book (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper aims at pointing out the need for a more equitable, internationally driven approach to solve elder care staff shortages, on the background of the implications deriving from the widespread phenomenon of employing migrant care workers in the Italian elder care sector. The paper describes at first how this form of care provision has become so popular in this country to face the long term care needs characterising its ageing population. Main reasons are identified, on the one hand, in the decreasing availability of informal care, due to the increasing female participation in the labor market, a longer working life and a reduction in the support provided by social networks. On the “formal” side, a major role has been played also by the lack of appropriate long term care services, such as residential and public home care, as well as by a chronic shortage of nursing staff and a shorter length of hospital stays. The traditionally “cash-oriented” profile of the Italian welfare system – more based on cash-for-care measures rather than in-kind services – has ended up with perpetuating familistic tendencies stimulating the employment of foreign migrant care workers, often on a live-in, undeclared basis. The paper’s conclusions focus on the analysis of the main opportunities and challenges raised by this phenomenon, trying to catch all involved parties’ perspectives: the older care recipients’ families; the migrant care workers; the receiving and the sending societies. This approach allows to identify core advantages of this solution in the possibility to increase ageing in place opportunities (thus reducing institutionalisation rates) and to provide a more personalised home care at reasonable costs. On the other hand, drawbacks can occur in terms of low quality of care, risk of widespread undeclared labour conditions, possible exploitation of foreign migrants and abuse of older people, as well as “brain and care drain” effects in sending countries. A more neutral, internationally driven governance is therefore suggested in order to minimize these risks and promote equitable solutions to solve care provision shortages in some countries without “plundering the future” of other nations.

  • 17.
    Colomer, Laia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Book Review. Museums, Migration and Identity in Europe. Peoples, Places and Identities, edited by Christopher Whitehead, Susannah Eckersley, Katherine Lloyd, and Rhiannon Mason (eds.) 2015 . Ashgate, Surrey2016In: International Journal of Heritage Studies (IJHS), ISSN 1352-7258, E-ISSN 1470-3610, Vol. 22, no 10, p. 863-866Article, book review (Refereed)
  • 18.
    Colomer, Laia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Arts and Humanities, Department of Cultural Sciences.
    Feeling like at home in airports: experiences, memories and affects of placeness among Third Culture Kids2018In: Applied Mobilities, ISSN 2380-0127, p. 1-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When analysed as network places for the mobility of subjects and objects, many descriptions refer to airports as placeless and meaningless spaces carrying no singular identity to themselves and to their users. This imagery does not necessarily fit with those people whose experiences are intrinsically linked to mobility as a recurrent early life style and as a part of their subjective identity. Drawing on affect theory this paper portrays an alternative picture of airports as meaningful places through the narratives made by a particular community of onward/multiple migrants, adult “Third Culture Kids”, associated with the experiences and memories of transiting in airports. By doing it, this article aims to add another dimension to mobilities that regards people’s affections and experiences ascribed to places of mobility.

  • 19.
    Ehrenstråhle, Ulrika
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, School of Social Sciences.
    Roma discrimination in Europe: an investigation using the analytical framework of Zygmunt Bauman2012Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the discriminatory situation of Romas in contemporary Europe with the use of Zygmunt Bauman’s analytical framework he developed on the situation of Jews and the Holocaust. Characteristics of the Modern Society have, according to Bauman, created opportunities for cornerstones of discrimination to occur and together with facilitators they can hold the discrimination alive and make it long lasting. In the case Bauman examined, it all ended in genocide. With the aim to investigate how Bauman’s analytical framework would explain why Roma discrimination could continue and by using a qualitative method of text substance analysis of foremost academic articles, the situation of the Romas are presented in a code according to the concepts in a scheme of Bauman’s analytical framework. There is no genocide going on today against Romas, but when looking through the glasses of Bauman and implementing his analytical framework on the Roma situation, only one stone is missing for it to happen. This paper concludes that there are no reasons to deny that a new Holocaust can happen in the modern society of Europe, but this time with another minority group as victims. Racism seems to be there, the only missing element is a stronger belief in racial hierarchy. This paper also offers an analytical scheme for future studies on other groups that have been suffering of long lasting discrimination, to further emphasize how Bauman’s framework would be able to become generalized on discrimination.

  • 20.
    Ekberg, Jan
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Business, Economics and Design, Linnaeus School of Business and Economics.
    Ankomstortens betydelse. Om regionala skillnader i invandrares sysselsättning2010In: Lyckad invandring / [ed] M. Ådahl, Stockholm: Fores Förlag , 2010Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 21.
    Ekberg, Jan
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Economics and Statistics.
    Lindh, Thomas
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Economics and Statistics.
    Immigrants in the Old-Age Pension System: The Case of Sweden2016In: International migration (Geneva. Print), ISSN 0020-7985, E-ISSN 1468-2435, Vol. 54, no 5, p. 5-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article investigates incomes and especially state pensions 2008 among elderly immigrants who arrived in Sweden before 1970. At age 70 and above, the level of state old-age pension for immigrant men was nearly the same and for immigrant women somewhat higher than for natives with similar characteristics. At age 65-66 the state pension was lower for immigrants than for their native counterparts. The differences in pensions for immigrants of different ages are probably due to changed rules in the Swedish state old-age pension system from 2003. The new rules have hit different age groups in different ways. The gaps are partially levelled out when other incomes are included. The extent to which levelling occurs varies greatly between different immigrant groups. For immigrants who have arrived during the last decades, the future state old-age pension outcomes are expected to be worse.

  • 22.
    Eliassi, Barzoo
    Oxford University.
    Conceptualising statelessness and belonging: The cases of Kurdish diasporas in Sweden and UK2014Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dr Eliassi's presentation explored how statelessness is experienced and narrated by members of the Kurdish diasporas in Sweden and the UK. Concerning the broader debates on statelessness that have focused mainly on the acquisition of nationality/citizenship as a solution to the political and existential vulnerability of stateless individuals and collectivities, Eliassi's presentation illustrated that while the acquisition of citizenship is important, it has also its limits in understanding the everyday life of people who consider themselves to be stateless in the world of nation-states. In Sweden the majority of Kurds have Swedish citizenship but claim to be stateless. The notion of statelessness is used to motivate transnational political mobilization and to maintain a politicised identity.10 In this context, citizenship can become a device of inclusion as well as of exclusion as the notion of ‘We are all citizens’ can maintain political inequality. In fact, the liberal citizenship tradition cannot fully accommodate the political grievances of stateless people like the Kurds because, as long as the sovereign identities are not decentred in Iran, Iraq, Syria and Turkey, Kurds by large will continue to perceive themselves as an endangered nation. Dr Demir, the discussant, highlighted that in the world of nation states, the issue is not that of statelessness but of master identity: the task has to be to de-master the dominant master identity as we all live in multi-national states and the idea of ‘Nation States’ is a discourse, a claim that does not exist in reality.

  • 23.
    Eliassi, Barzoo
    Mid Sweden University, Sweden.
    Diskriminerande föreställningar inom socialtjänsten2006In: Den segregerande integrationen: Om social sammanhållning och dess hinder / [ed] Masoud Kamali, Stockholm: Fritzes, 2006, p. 251-294Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 24.
    Eliassi, Barzoo
    Oxford University, UK.
    Iranian Consulate and its denial of Kurdish Identity: "Kurds are portrayed as linguistic bastards"2014In: Your Middle East, no May 15Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    On May 11, The Iranian Consulate released a statement about Iran's perspective regarding its relationship with the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. This statement was issued in the Kurdish city of Slemani (Sulaimania) and constructs an image of the Kurds that is permeated by misrecognition, distortion and humiliation, writes Barzoo Eliassi.

  • 25.
    Eliassi, Barzoo
    Lund University.
    Kurds in the shadow of Iranian Citizenship2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 26.
    Eliassi, Barzoo
    Oxford University, UK ; Lund University, Sweden.
    La Diaspora Kurde en Suède2014In: Hommes & Migrations, ISSN 1142-852X, no 1307, p. 144--149Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 27.
    Eliassi, Barzoo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Oxford University ; Lund University ; Linköping University.
    Making a Kurdistani identity in Diaspora: Kurdish Migrants in Sweden2015In: Diasporas Reimagined: Spaces, Practices and Belonging / [ed] Nando Sigona, Alan Gamblen, Giulia Liberatore and Hélène Neveu Kringelback, Oxford: Oxford University, Oxford Diasporas Program , 2015, p. 45-49Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Eliassi, Barzoo
    Lund University.
    Mellan tillhörighet och exkludering: Identitetsformering och motstånd bland unga kurder i Sverige2012In: Locus, ISSN 1100-3197, no 3, p. 32-50Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Eliassi, Barzoo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Oxford University, UK ; Lund university.
    Nationalism, Cosmopolitanism and Statelessness: An interview with Craig Calhoun2014In: Kurdish Studies journal, ISSN 2051-4883, E-ISSN 2051-4891, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 61-74Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This interview with Professor Craig Calhoun expands on issues of nationalism and cosmopolitanism in relation to the question of statelessness. Since the 1990s, Calhoun has worked on nationalism, ethnicity and cosmopolitanism. For Calhoun, nations still matter despite post-national and cosmopolitan elaboration and repudiation of so-called parochial and provincialised identities like nation or national identity and citizenship. In this interview, Calhoun dis-cusses the material, political and cultural situations of the Kurds in the Middle East and the role of Kurdish nationalism in the context of statelessness. Calhoun finds class-based understanding of inequalities between the Kurds and their dominant others in the Middle East as problematic and incomplete since the cultural, political and material inequalities are intimately interlinked in rendering the Kurds to a subordinated position in the states they inhabit. The interview also engages with diasporic identities and examines how countries of residence can impinge on the identity formation of diasporas and how they obstruct or facilitate migrants translating their citizenship status into the right to have rights (Arendt). An important issue that Calhoun discusses is that there are both asymmetrical power relations between dominated (Kurdish) and dominating nationalisms (Turkish, Iraqi, Iranian and Syrian) and within the same nationalisms.

    This interview with Professor Craig Calhoun expands on issues of nationalism and cosmopolitanism in relation to the question of statelessness. Since the 1990s, Calhoun has worked on nationalism, ethnicity and cosmopolitanism. For Calhoun, nations still matter despite post-national and cosmopolitan elaboration and repudiation of so-called parochial and provincialised identities like nation or national identity and citizenship. In this interview, Calhoun dis-cusses the material, political and cultural situations of the Kurds in the Middle East and the role of Kurdish nationalism in the context of statelessness. Calhoun finds class-based understanding of inequalities between the Kurds and their dominant others in the Middle East as problematic and incomplete since the cultural, political and material inequalities are intimately interlinked in rendering the Kurds to a subordinated position in the states they inhabit. The interview also engages with diasporic identities and examines how countries of residence can impinge on the identity formation of diasporas and how they obstruct or facilitate migrants translating their citizenship status into the right to have rights (Arendt). An important issue that Calhoun discusses is that there are both asymmetrical power relations between dominated (Kurdish) and dominating nationalisms (Turkish, Iraqi, Iranian and Syrian) and within the same nationalisms.

  • 30.
    Eliassi, Barzoo
    Lund University.
    Nationalism, statelessness and reactive identity formation among Kurdish youth in Sweden2011Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper is engaged with the politics of belonging among Kurdish youth. It aims to discuss how Kurdish identity and subjectivity can be understood following Antonio Gramsci within practices of hegemony and the ways the subalternity of Kurds as a stateless people are produced in everyday life. I will use narrative accounts of young Kurdish men and women to discuss experiences of denial by dominant subjects and the jettisoned position they occupy as a stateless nation in the world of unequal nation-states and hierarchical citizenship.

  • 31.
    Eliassi, Barzoo
    Lund University.
    Orientalist Social Work: Cultural Otherization of Muslim Immigrants in Sweden2013In: Critical Social Work, ISSN 1543-9372, E-ISSN 1543-9372, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 33-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This aim of this article is to critically examine how the concept of culture is used in Sweden to explain the “failure” or the difficulties that Muslim immigrant families are experiencing with regards to their integration into the dominant society. Whereas, the Swedish society is often represented as ‘modern’, ‘progressive’, and ‘democratic’, immigrants with Muslim backgrounds are predominately described as ‘traditional’, ‘authoritarian’ and ‘pre-modern’. There is a widely held idea within Swedish social work research that immigrant families and the white mainstream Swedish society are situated within two different value systems with different world-views regarding family and gender relations. Due to this entrenched binary opposition, Orientalism becomes constitutive to social work research and practices.

  • 32.
    Eliassi, Barzoo
    Lund University.
    Reproduction of national conflicts in diaspora: The case of Kurdish youth in Sweden2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 33.
    Eliassi, Barzoo
    Lund University.
    Stateless diaspora in the Swedish civil society2012In: Nordic Migration Research Conference & 9th ETMU Days, University of Turku, 13th-15th August 2012, Turku: University of Turku, Finland , 2012Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Eliassi, Barzoo
    Lund University.
    Subordinated inclusion of Kurdish youth in Sweden2011Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 35.
    Eliassi, Barzoo
    Lund University.
    Sweden Democrat's Anti-Muslim Hysteria2011In: Open Democracy, ISSN 1476-5888, article id 28 novArticle in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Ethnic discrimination and vilification of Muslims in Europe show that European democracy is declining while racism and repressive policies are taking root and becoming the natural order of mainstream politics in many European countries.

  • 36.
    Eliassi, Barzoo
    Lund University.
    The Second-Generation Kurdish Diaspora in Sweden2013In: Crisis, Critique and Change: Diasporic Translations: Reformulating Ethnic and Political Identities in Diaspora, Turin, Italy: University of Turin , 2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Eliassi, Barzoo
    Lund University.
    "We Kurds did not come to Sweden to become Swedish but continuing being Kurdish"2012In: 2nd Scientific World Kurdish Congress (WKC2012) in Hawler/Erbil, October 11-15, 2012, Hawler/Erbil, 2012, p. 16-Conference paper (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Based on 50 interviews, this paper engages with identity formation among young people with Kurdish backgrounds regarding processes of inclusion and exclusion in Sweden and the Middle East. Hundreds of thousands of Kurds have fled Kurdistan and migrated to Western countries due to, among other reasons, violent conflicts, political persecution, mass murders, and repressive assimilation policy in Turkey, Iran, Iraq and Syria. Historical experiences and social inequities are important repertoires for the construction of belonging and identification among Kurdish youth in Sweden. Nevertheless, it is mainly through the intersection of a ‘minoritized’ Kurdish identity in the Middle-East and a ‘minoritized’ Kurdish identity in Sweden through which young people construct their identities. For Kurds, migration to Sweden involves once again occupying a minoritized position, not only as Kurds, but also as gendered and racialized categories such as immigrants, “wogs”, Muslims, Middle-Easterners and Orientals. Despite this minoritized position, Kurds face a significantly different political reality in Sweden where they can organize themselves around their national identity as Kurds and freely express their ‘Kurdishness’ without state-sanctioned harassment. This paper focuses also on those strategies that Kurdish youth use to defend and construct an exclusive Kurdish identity that result from everyday confrontations that occur between young Kurds and certain youth with Arabic, Persian and Turkish backgrounds in Sweden – with those who challenge, make inferior and deny the existence of the Kurdish national identity. While the youth praise the political freedom and democracy that prevails in Sweden and the political support that Sweden provides Kurds, they also question the structural inequality and ethnic relations of dominance and subordination that alienate youth and deny them access to full citizenship rights. This study is based on a forthcoming book entitled “Contesting Kurdish Identities in Sweden” that will be published by Palgrave.

  • 38.
    Eliassi, Barzoo
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ülkemde Bir Yabancı: İsveç´teki Kürt Gençlerinin Aidiyet Politikaları2012Book (Refereed)
    Abstract [tr]

    Bu kitapta, Kürt geçmişine sahip gençlerin dahil etme ve dışlama süreçleri karşısında İsveç’te kimliklerini nasıl oluşturdukları incelenmekte; bu gençlerin etnik ayrımcılık ve ırkçılıkla baş etmek için başvurdukları yollara ışık tutulmaktadır. Ayrıca bu kitap, sosyal çalışma disiplini için bu sosyal süreçlerin önemine ve sosyal çalışmacıların dezavantajlı ve marjinalize edilmiş gruplarla çalışabilme ve onların ırkçı ve ayrımcı uygulamaların ötesinde bir sosyal adalet ile tam eşit vatandaşlık için verdikleri mücadeleyi destekleme yollarına ana hatlarıyla değinmektedir. Ampirik analiz İsveç’te yaşayan ve Kürt geçmişine sahip 28 erkek ve kadın gençle yapılan görüşmelere dayanmaktadır. Post-kolonyal teori, aidiyet ve kimlik inşası, bu çalışmanın kavramsal çerçevesinin nüvesini oluşturmaktadır. Bu çalışmaya katılan gençler, etnik ayrımcılık ve damgalanmayı tecrübe ettikleri farklı alanlardan bahsettiler. Bu tecrübeler; emek piyasası, kitlesel medya, konaklama ayrımcılığı, yasal sistem ve okul sistemi alanlarında yaşananları kapsamaktadır. Katılımcılar, İsveçli kimliğiyle ilgili dışlamacı söylemler aracılığıyla “normal” İsveçlilerin onların İsveç toplumuna katılımını etkilemedeki rollerine değindiler. Katılımcıların İsveç’teki yaşam durumu, etnik ayrımcılık hissi bir tarafa, Ortadoğulu geçmişine sahip diğer gençlerle kimlik oluşumu üzerindeki tartışmalar da İsveç’te kendi vatandaşlık haklarını tatbik edebilme yolları ve günlük yaşamda dışlamacı uygulamalarla nasıl başa çıkılacağı ile ilgili güçlü Kürt milliyetçi duyguları besleyen en önemli nedenlerdendir. Bu çalışma, kişiler arası tartışma ve münakaşalar, isimlerini İsveççe isimlerle değiştirme, kendi ve öteki arasındaki farklılıkları pekiştirme, şiddet, sessizlik ve ırkçılığa kasten aldırmamak gibi çeşitli yollarla katılımcıların etnik ayrımcılığa karşılık verdiklerini ve direndiklerini göstermektedir. Ayrıca, ataerkil “namus cinayeti” söyleminden dolayı günlük yaşamda maruz kaldıkları cinsiyetlendirilmiş* ırkçılığı tartışmakta ve ona açıkça karşı çıkmaktalar. Araştırmaya katılanların, kısmen, beyazlığın değerini yücelten ırkçı post-kolonyal söylemden dolayı İsveçlilik sınırları içinde eşit bir yer almaları reddedilmektedir. Paradoksal bir biçimde, katılımcılardan bazıları mümkün olduğunca beyazlığa yakın olan modern bir Kürt kimliği iddiasında bulunmak için aynı söylemi siyahi insanlara, Afrikalılara, yeni gelen Kürt göçmenlere (“ithalatlara”) “Çingeneler”e ve İslama karşı kullanmaktadırlar. Bu durum ırkçılığın çok boyutluluğunu gösteriyor. Irkçılığa ve etnik ayrımcılığa maruz kalanlar ayrımcı olabilmekte ve ırkçı söylemi yeniden üretebilmektedirler. Eşit olmayan güç ilişkilerine rağmen, hem hakim özneler hem de azınlıklaştırılmış öznelerin hepsi öznellikleri, aidiyeti ve özdeşleşmeyi inşa etmede post-kolonyal şartların damgasını taşımaktadır.

  • 39.
    Eliassi, Barzoo
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Andersson, Dan-Erik
    Stenberg, Leif
    Sport and Politics of Belonging among Middle Eastern Immigrants in Sweden2013Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 40.
    Elmeroth, Elisabeth
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Education, Psychology and Sport Science.
    Searching for coherence from Viet Nam to Sweden2011In: International Journal of Migration, Health and Social Care, ISSN 1747-9894, E-ISSN 2042-8650, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 120-130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose – This study seeks to capture the lived experiences of five refugees making the transition from Viet Nam to Sweden. It seeks to focus on the problems of integration in Swedish society.

    Design/methodology/approach The research took a narrative approach by asking questions about the ways in which refugees make sense of the multiple and sometimes dramatic changes that exile involves. The interpretation procedure was performed in three recurring phases: naïve reading, thematic structural analysis and comprehensive understanding.

    Findings – In the structural analyses, three sub-themes were abstracted: in the hands of authorities/forced to leave home; regarded as uneducated and untrained; and lack of balance. These sub-themes show a situation that could be interpreted by the concept of sense of coherence (SOC). The comprehensive understanding shows that the prerequisites for a stable SOC are unsatisfactory.

    Practical implications – The study reported here implies that there is a need for changes in integration policy. In an integrated society, individuals should be met with a policy that aims to empower and takes into consideration the lived experiences and different components that work together to create an SOC.

    Originality/value – The contribution from this research is the combination of qualitative data, the theory about SOC, and the description of the edifice of SOC. This combination helps to understand and explain the essence of the respondents' lived experiences.

  • 41.
    Elmeroth, Elisabeth
    et al.
    University of Kalmar.
    Häge, Johan
    Flyktens barn: - medkänsla, migration och mänskliga rättigheter2009Book (Other academic)
  • 42.
    Elmeroth, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Education.
    Häge, Johan
    Flyktens barn: Medkänsla, migration och mänskliga rättigheter2016 (ed. 2)Book (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    För dem som arbetar med flyktingar är det centralt att reflektera över och utveckla förståelse för de familjer, barn, ungdomar och vuxna som kommer till Sverige från svåra omständigheter. De behöver tas emot av kunniga medmänniskor med förmåga till inlevelse.Flyktens barn erbjuder kunskap om de våldshärdar som orsakat människornas flykt och introducerar strategier för professionellt bemötande av flyktingar. Denna andra upplaga av boken innehåller uppdaterad information och nya perspektiv på konflikter och våld i världen.Boken vänder sig till blivande och verksamma lärare, specialpedagoger, psykologer, socionomer och personal inom olika vårdyrken samt andra med intresse för migration och mänskliga rättigheter. Alla som möter flyktens barn har en möjlighet att genom kunskap och empati göra en insats för en bättre värld.

  • 43.
    Elmkvist, Magdalena
    Linnaeus University, School of Business and Economics, Department of Economics and Statistics.
    Historical view of the Swedish international migration policy in the case of refugees2018Conference paper (Refereed)
  • 44.
    Fioretos, Ingrid
    et al.
    Lund university.
    Gustafsson, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Norström, Eva
    Lund university.
    Kommunikation med stöd av tolk2014In: Kommunikation med barn och unga i vården / [ed] Maja Söderbäck, Stockholm: Liber, 2014, p. 201-213Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 45.
    Gargano, Francesco
    et al.
    University of Palermo, Italy.
    Tamburino, Lucia
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Technology, Department of Mathematics.
    Bagarello, Fabio
    University of Palermo, Italy ; INFN National Institute for Nuclear Physics, Italy.
    Bravo, Giangiacomo
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Studies.
    Large-scale effects of migration and conflict in pre-agricultural groups: Insights from a dynamic model2017In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 12, no 3, article id e0172262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The debate on the causes of conflict in human societies has deep roots. In particular, the extent of conflict in hunter-gatherer groups remains unclear. Some authors suggest that large-scale violence only arose with the spreading of agriculture and the building of complex societies. To shed light on this issue, we developed a model based on operatorial techniques simulating population-resource dynamics within a two-dimensional lattice, with humans and natural resources interacting in each cell of the lattice. The model outcomes under different conditions were compared with recently available demographic data for prehistoric South America. Only under conditions that include migration among cells and conflict was the model able to consistently reproduce the empirical data at a continental scale. We argue that the interplay between resource competition, migration, and conflict drove the population dynamics of South America after the colonization phase and before the introduction of agriculture. The relation between population and resources indeed emerged as a key factor leading to migration and conflict once the carrying capacity of the environment has been reached.

  • 46.
    Gustafsson, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Identity negotiating in Scandinavia: Negotiation identity in Scandinavia: Women, migration and the diaspora. Haci Akman (ed.)2015In: Ethnologia Scandinavica, ISSN 0348-9698, Vol. 45, p. 216-217Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 47.
    Gustafsson, Kristina
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    The reception of separated minors in Sweden: To receive with grace and knowledge2015In: Participation, Integration, and Recognition: Changing Pathways to Immigrant Incorporation / [ed] Elli Heikkilä, Auvo Kostiainen, Johanna Leinonen, Ismo Söderling, Turku: Institute of Migration , 2015, p. 111-124Conference paper (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to describe the reception of separated minors in Sweden and analyse some central ideas and ethics as they are manifested, interpreted and practiced by professionals involved in the reception system. What impact do these ideas and ethics have on separated children? This article is based on extensive fieldwork consisting of more than 100 interviews and observations among actors in the reception system. Theories of differences and similarities are used to investigate how professionals perceive minors both as normal teenagers and as culturally different aliens who need to become “Swedish”. The study concludes that a combination of the ideas of similarities and differences, where the minors are recognised as persons with various backgrounds and experiences, could upon reflection result in a more gracious reception.

  • 48.
    Gustafsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work. Halmstad university.
    Fioretos, Ingrid
    Malmö university.
    Norström, Eva
    Lund university.
    Att få vara den man är2013In: Barndom och migration / [ed] Maren Bak och Kerstin von Brömssen, Umeå: Boréa Bokförlag , 2013, p. 277-302Chapter in book (Refereed)
  • 49.
    Gustafsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Fioretos, Ingrid
    Lund University.
    Norström, Eva
    Lund University.
    Between empowerment and powerlessness: Separated minors in Sweden2012In: New Directions for Child and Adolescent Development, ISSN 1520-3247, E-ISSN 1534-8687, Vol. 2012, no 136, p. 65-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article analyzes the migration experiences of thirteen separated minors who arrived in Sweden between 1943 and 2008. Using the framework of "dislocation" and the "liberated self," this chapter shows that the experiences of separated minors are shaped in the intersection between contexts and conditions of transnational migration and the Swedish reception system. Their efforts to continue living based on the past and building a new life during a period of transition between different countries and between childhood and adulthood can be described as "a life on hold." The paradox that migration serves simultaneously to empower and render children powerless is discussed.

  • 50.
    Gustafsson, Kristina
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Social Work.
    Johansson, Jesper
    Linnaeus University, Faculty of Health, Social Work and Behavioural Sciences, School of Social Work.
    Negotiated reception of refugees and migrants. Mixed reference group interviews as a source of knowledge production about social work in times of migration2018Conference paper (Refereed)
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